?From the great beyond into the present? ? an interview with Jo Lendle

Hanser publisher Jo Lendle talks about gentle adjustments of languages and marketing strategies.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Saturday 20 - Friday 26 June, 2006

German-Iranian writer Navid Kermani is keeping a diary in Tehran. Henryk Broder explains why the Germans are particularly qualified to tell the Israelis how to behave. Isabel Fonseca reports on the treatment of the Roma in Kosovo, where they are dying at the hands of the UN. The film industry has discovered that illegal downloaders are not such a threat to them after all. And in a dramatic U-turn, Egypt is actually having Israeli books translated into Arabic.
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Saturday 13 - Friday 19 June, 2009

Iran, of course, has been the focus all week. Mariam Lau looks at what Hussein Moussavi stands for. German-Iranian poet Said is deeply sceptical about this so-called reformer. And the FAZ issues a fatwa: rigged elections breach sharia! Chinese writer Yu Hua talks about freedom in China, where you can bad-mouth anyone or anything, except the government. The first Euro MPirate Christian Engststöm wants copyright cut to 5 years. The German Bundestag has just adopted its first Internet censorship law. And Jürgen Habermas remembers the constructive intellect of sociologist Ralf Dahrendorf.
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Saturday 6 - Friday 12 June, 2005

Iranian women's rights activist Parvin Ardalan explains how tiring it is when hemlines are not dictated by fashion. At the Venice Biennale, Slovak charm won over German talking cats. Are we really living in capitalism, asks Peter Sloterdijk, after all "fully fledged tax states reclaim half of all economic successes every year". The Jungle World watches as Iran's religious elites rip each other to shreds. And the taz shows that arranged marriages can ruin men's lives too.
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Saturday 29 May - Friday 5 June, 2009

The blog Liza's World is stunned by the world's silence on the allegations against Sri Lanka. Chinese writer Li Dawei sees Mao's spirit wandering China's streets by night. On the 200th anniversary of Hayden's death, the NZZ looks at his humiliating contract with the royal house. The new Magritte Museum in Brussels unveils a radical new hanging of the artist's work. And economic ethicist Peter Koslowski debunks the notion the financial world needs to rebuild trust.
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