?From the great beyond into the present? ? an interview with Jo Lendle

Hanser publisher Jo Lendle talks about gentle adjustments of languages and marketing strategies.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Friday 30 June, 2006

Why is Angela Merkel so successful? Because she's a chancellor without qualities, writes author Juli Zeh. The SZ discusses criticism that the Gates Foundation now has inordinate financial clout. The FAZ reflects on the artistic significance of Damien Hirst's shark, now dissolving in its formaldehyde soup. And Die Welt fails to understand Old World objections to Google Print.
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Thursday 29 June, 2006

Conductor Christian Thielemann elucidates the "dark German sound" like this: Tyaaa-tyaaa-tyaaa-tyaa-tyaa-tyaa-tyaaa, and not like this: Tyaaa-tyaaa-tyaaa-yapp-ta-ta-taa. Mayo Thompson of the psychedelic rock band "The Red Krayola" philosophises about Wittgenstein and America, and Daniel Cohn-Bendit philosophises about Zinedine Zidane. Olga Martynova tells the story of house plants in the Soviet Union. And Iranian opposition figure Akbar Ganji says oil is the biggest hindrance to democracy in Iran.
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Wednesday 28 June, 2006

A court in the Netherlands has ruled the restitution of the sensational Koenigs art collection. An exhibition in Frankfurt looks at early 20th century representations of the city in its heyday. Pan-Arab pop music channels marry Western video aesthetics with oriental sounds for 300 million listeners. And Richard Wagner's great granddaugther Nike wonders why the Bayreuth Festival is still living off the public drip.
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Tuesday 27 June, 2006

The SZ offers advice on how to beat the new terrorism: stay calm. Georg Klein recommends singing the German national anthem as a near death experience. Writer Thomas Brussig blows the whistle on tax hikes for health reform negotiated while Germany is in the throes of football fever. French author Patrick Modiano reflects on Paris' alter ego, Berlin. And the FAZ laments the passing of Bruno, the first wild brown bear here in almost two centuries.
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Saturday 24 June - Monday 26 June, 2006

The Ingeborg Bachmann Prize has been awarded to journalist Kathrin Passig, whose story "You are here" won unanimous praise from the critics. German historian Ernst Nolte, having taken on communism and fascism, would like to turn his attention to Islamism. Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales explains that he's more elitist than egalitarian. And a German art project is turning Polish Zamosc into an Ideal City.
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Friday 23 June, 2006

While academics at New York University are playing with a 100 gigabit per second Internet, Jürgen Habermas claims the medium can only have political relevance if it responds to mainstream media. While the art market booms, the European wine market slumps. And Israeli homosexuals and lesbians are going to march in Jerusalem, despite disapproval from on high.
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Thursday 22 June, 2006

Die Zeit asks if the "good mood World Cup" is kicking Deutschland in the right direction. Politician Gregor Gysi is reassured by Germany's new patriotism. Accused of plagiarism, Feridun Zaimoglu has revealed the tapes that inspired his book "Leyla". Volker Schlöndorff reminisces about Billy Wilder on the late filmmakers' 100th birthday. And the NZZ portrays Osamu Tezuka, the "God of manga."
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Wednesday 21 June, 2006

Tom Stoppard rocks in London's Royal Court Theatre, while Herzog & de Meuron show off the banal side of their archtictural practice in Munich. Up and coming author Clemens Meyer is hoping to cash in at the Ingeborg Bachmann Prize, while Berlin's Opera Foundation is having to cash out. And Google Book Search continues to meet with all-round disapproval.
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Tuesday 20 June, 2006

Writer Daniel Kehlmann is glad to be less grim and better selling than postwar German authors. Poland's state-owned TV broadcaster has a new head. The taz frowns at a proposed smoking ban. Author Mahi Binebine tells why Maghrebians see Europe as an Eldorado. And despite its kitsch, Gustav Klimt's "sheet metal" portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer is second to none in its portrayal of an era.
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Saturday 17 June - Monday 19 June, 2006

Hungarian author Laszlo Darvasi considers the similarities between football and literature, German playwright Thomas Brussig welcomes the emergence of a new German patriotism. Austrian playwright Peter Handke elaborates on the complexity of Balkan politics, French philosopher Andre Glucksmann considers the Somaliasation of the world. Cartoonist Ralf König purges his system of the cartoon controversy and writer Liane Dirks reveals further dark details in the case of Adolf Eichmann.
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Friday 16 June, 2006

The NZZ wonders if the Netzeitung's "Readers Edition" will really revolutionise journalism. Confusions arise at the RoboCup when the Humanoid League mistakes the spectators for the ball. Writer Dunja Melcic is worried about the rise of Serbian nationalism. Frankfurt's "The Conquest of the Street" exhibition compares takes on big-city life. And actor Klaus Maria Brandauer speaks out against 'director's theatre'.
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Thursday 15 June, 2006

An historic head has rolled at the French paper Liberation. Filmmaker Rosa von Praunheim reveals his gruelling teaching methods. Writer Bora Cosic explains how he was mollycoddled out of a football career. Martin Kippenberger's filmic life has finally been made into a film. And Busta Ryhmes has remembered his childhood idols to cogent effect.
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Wednesday 14 June, 2006

Günter Grass says Peter Handke could be worthy of the Heinrich Heine Prize - after all Heine endorsed Napoleonic terror. Architect Zaha Hadid asks if buildings can float in the air. Polish author Wojciech Kuczok gives an historical explanation for why Poles can't play football. Theatre director Matthias Hartmann is now a priceless commodity. Ricardo Muti tells of his faible for Neapolitan baroque music and the FR is lulled by singing siren Justine Electra.
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Tuesday 13 June, 2006

Obituaries abound for the visionary composer György Ligeti who died yesterday. Philosopher Peter Sloterdijk says the Left should return to its roots as a "bank of anger". Writer Monica Maron is stunned that all feuilletons are able to write off Emine Özdamar's novel as generic Turkish girl material. The Dashanzi art festival in Peking is catering to the ironic visitor, and there are oohs and aahs for the football-playing robots in Bremen.
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Saturday 10 June - Monday 12 June, 2006

Dusseldorf stages a Martin Kippenberger retrospective, the artist who really grasped the 1980s. At a theatre festival in Caracas the entire city has become a stage. The Jean-Luc Godard show "Voyage(s) en utopie" mixes Freud and Readymades. The weekend papers ponder Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's success and Miao Xiaochun's "The last Judgement in Cyberspace."
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Friday 9 June, 2006

Peter Handke refuses the Heinrich Heine Prize in a letter to Düsseldorf's mayor. Hungarian writer Laszlo Darvasi tells how football brings out the beast in man. Costa Rican diplomat Esteban Penrod explains that his country will trounce Germany in today's World Cup kick-off match. And the NZZ reports that the newspaper market is booming after all.
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Thursday 8 June, 2006

Author Martin Mosebach defends Peter Handke and accuses the politicians and diplomats who egged Milosovic on in the Bosnian war. The feuilletons take up the Sabrow Commission's report on how to portray life in communist East Germany. Rights activist Richard Schröder says Germany needs a merry monument. The SZ looks into reports that Adolf Eichmann's whereabouts were known long before his abduction. And Elfriede Jelinek admits she's not intelligent enough for football.
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Wednesday 7 June, 2006

The feuilletons are warming up for the FIFA World Cup, which starts Friday. An exhibition on architecture and sport shows the stadium for what it is: a temple. Bertelsmann media group has bought up the rights to the entire gamut of World Cup publications, and a run of gimmics and games besides. Meanwhile, Madrid is in Picasso fever, and Berlin and Tokyo have joined forces for a combined art show in Berlin.
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Saturday 3 June - Tuesday 6 June, 2006

The FAZ prints a letter by historian Golo Mann on the Historikerstreit, which rocked the intellectual world in Germany 20 years ago. Abdelkader Benali tells how Robert Musil helps understand Lebanon today. Thomas Brussig portrays Germany's secret World Cup weapon. Writer Bora Cosic denounces Peter Handke as a false advocate for Serbia. And the Berliner Zeitung talks mental environmentalism with adbuster Kalle Lasn.
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Friday 2 June, 2006

The furore over Peter Handke has still not blown over. Two of the Heinrich Heine Prize jury members today published their letter of resignation in the SZ, the FAZ calls the affair the "ultimate form of social backslide" and Serbian Andrej Ivanji publicly distances himself from Handke in die taz. A new exhibition on Germanness at the National German Museum shows a good deal of self-irony. And stories of loose morals still inflame the Roma quarter of Istanbul which is about to be pulled down.
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Thursday 1 June, 2006

Peter Handke calls for an end to all comparison of Bosnian and Serbian crimes. Historian Götz Aly calls for a complete overhaul of the historical contextualisation of the Holocaust. Hans Magnus Enzensberger looks at the high costs of the death cult. And authors Zafer Senocak and Ilija Trojanov look at which side is more influential in Germany's 'foreign infiltration trend'.
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