They?re Still Painting, and More: The Leipzig Art Scene

First a success, then a bubble: the hype surrounding the ?New Leipzig School? put the city on the map of the art world, but also blinkered its vision.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Saturday 22- Friday 28 November, 2008

Viktor Erofeev describes how Putinism is buying citizens' loyalty, by allowing them control over their private lives. Dmitri Muratov praises the courage of the jury in the Politkovskaya murder trial. The SZ prints David Grossman's acceptance speech on winning the Scholl Siblings Prize. The blood and sperm theatre of the Volksbühne is dead, but refusing to stay down. The Norwegians are warming to Knut Hamsun again. And Levi-Strauss has turned 100.
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Saturday 15 - Friday 21 November, 2008

As Ukrainians commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Holodomor, the Berliner Zeitung is shocked by Dimitri Medvedev's elastic understanding of the word "genocide". The FR remembers a fateful decision that shaped the lives of Alexandr Solzhenitsyn and Varlam Shalamov. In die Welt, Mikhail Khordokovsky predicts a global leftwards shift. Pianist Peter Feuchtwanger sings the praises of the drooping wrist. And sociologist Wolfgang Sofsky says it's the tight fist - which makes the world go round.
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Saturday 8 - Friday 14 November, 2008

Art Spiegelman talks about his "Portrait of the Artist as a Young %@)*!" The editor of salon.eu.sk, Martin Simeka, responds to the eleven star authors who swooped to Milan Kundera's defence. The FAZ is furious about Ferran Adria's lack of social responsibility. The SZ is amazed at how a sleeping pill can make Turkish blood boil. Alexander Kluge's film of Marx's "Kapital" is a work of art about a work of art. And the veil is finally lifted on WWI documentaries.
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Saturday 1 - Friday 7 November, 2008

The Kundera affair mostly goes unmentioned, despite the collective defence of the author by a group of Nobel Prize laureates. Only the Tagesspiegel demands objective truth. The taz portrays the flamboyant Turkish star author Murathan Mungan. The Finns are having to revise a WWII myth. Navid Kermani hopes that Obama's victory will speed up Europe's long learning process. And philosopher Jürgen Habermas reports back on the Hopperesque melancholy of pre-election USA.
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