On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Tuesday July 31, 2007

The feuilletons remember Ingmar Bergman. For the FAZ he was the successor to Chekhov and Strindberg, for the Tagesspiegel, a magician of primal fears, and for Lars von Trier, a father. The taz also remembers comedian and silent film pioneer Karl Valentin and his pre-punk hairdressing stunts. The FR celebrates the baboon-bottomed resurrection of Baroque at Salzburg.
read more

Saturday 28 July - Monday 30 July, 2007

The Salzburg Festival has opened with a play by Thomas Bernhard written in the 1960s for the Festspiele but never performed there. Dutch writer Cees Nooteboom presents a classic of Dutch literature he likens to cold fire. Philosopher Ernst Tugendhat is horrified by death for professional reasons. And Serbian writer Bora Cosic looks back on some funny and not-so-funny moments in the Serb-Russian alliance.
read more

Friday 27 July, 2007

The premiere of Katharina Wagner's Meistersinger debut in Bayreuth was, depending who you believe, a pubertal neither here-nor-there or a must-see. The AKP's victory in Turkey has reminded the bourgeois that they're not alone. And the recent publication of Goethe's son's travel journals provide wonderful descriptions of early 19th century Berlin as well as insights into the author's alcholic misery and devotion to his father.
read more

Thursday 26 July, 2007

Actor Ulrich Mühe, known internationally for his role as the Stasi agent in "The Lives of Others," has died. The papers celebrate his genius at playing typical Germans of all stripes. The NZZ looks at why the white Turks voted APK. And Richard Wagner's great granddaughter Katarina has dished up a flat Wagner pizza with her debut in Bayreuth.
read more

Wednesday 25 July, 2007

Hungarian-born director and Holocaust survivor George Tabori has died in Berlin aged 93. The Feuilletons pay ample tribute and the FAZ puts Tabori's last public appearance on a par with a Beckett play. Volker Schlöndorff's disparaging view of movies made for television has cost him a job. Writer Ilija Trojanow is more concerned about the state than terrorism. And the Dalai Lama promotes the lucky duck existence of monks.
read more

Tuesday 24 July, 2007

A day before the Bayreuth Festival opens, speculation is rife about which Wagner woman will succeed Wolfgang. Zafer Senocak asks how Muslim the Turks really are. The taz rebukes Father Tadeusz Rydzyk for a recent anti-Semitic address to Polish journalism students. And director Luk Perceval tells what potatoes, Zen and his lead actor have in common.
read more

Monday 23 and Saturday 21 July, 2007

Sociologist Wolfgang Sofsky laments Germans' acceptance of their rapidly disappearing private sphere. Christoph Schlingensief doesn't mind being bawled out by Wolfgang Wagner, as long as he's given a free creative hand. Najem Wali reminds us that the cultural explosion in Iraq shouldn't be confused with creative freedom. And tens of thousands of yurt-dwellers in Ulan Bator enjoy wireless Internet.
read more

Friday 20 July, 2007

Writer Elif Shafak calls for a more nuanced take on women in Turkey, now that they are playing such a key role in the elections. Harry Potter's world gets a dose of sober German analysis. Can Icann localize Internet domains, or will states can that plan? And New York's ancient bamboo water mains have got to go!
read more

Thursday 19 July, 2007

Sociologist Wolfgang Sofsky rails against the glass citizen, happy in all his transparency. The Olympics is like doping for China - looks good on the outside, reports Die Zeit. "Sorry" is not enough to make up for the false reporting on the G8, says the taz. And as Turkey approaches the elections, wild Kemalist conspiracy theories are selling like hot cakes.
read more

Wednesday 18 July, 2007

Philosopher Jason Hill gives a cosmopolitical answer to multiculturalism. Composer Heinz Holliger calls for resistance to the cultural machine. The SZ puts the racism of Rudolf Steiner under the loupe. And Montreux was submerged by a summer storm of purple rain.
read more

Tuesday 17 July, 2007

Vogue's success proves that the nouveau riche are fascinated by those who like them least. At Documenta, art is eaten and it's as good as a drug trip. A post-9/11 building boom peeves Damascus preservationists.. The FAZ opens a series on Islamism - how real is the danger? - and also asks if it might be time for a scholarly edition of "Mein Kampf."
read more

Monday 16 July, 2007

Johannes Tuchel tells Die Welt why neither Tom Cruise nor anyone else should turn an execution site into a film set. The NZZ is worried about the fate of art in the age of the event. Gustav Seibt calls the proposal to read "Satanic Verses" in a mosque "useless political symbolism." And Katharina Wagner gets ready for the battleground of Bayreuth.
read more

Friday 13 July, 2007

The Süddeutsche Zeitung reports from a neo-Nazi stronghold in Saxony Anhalt, where anger finds no productive outlet. Die Welt takes a look at gender-murder in Asia. The FAZ considers whether Germany would have the dirndl were it not for the Jewish Wallach brothers. And Barbara Ehrenreich's latest book explains why we are living in sad times.
read more

Thursday 12 July, 2007

Journalist and writer Günter Wallraff has ruffled many feathers with his wish to conduct a reading of "The Satanic Verses" in Cologne's spectacular new mosque. Bulgarian mezzosporano Vesselina Kasarova says nobody understands real singing or erotics in the opera any more. And Die Zeit sees no use and even less humour in Jonathan Meese's Hitler imitation.
read more

Wednesday 11 July, 2007

The FR thinks that Tom Cruise should be allowed to play Claus von Stauffenberg on original locations in his movie reenactment of the plot of kill Hilter - even if the Scientologist isn't everyone's idea of a German hero. The taz marvels at the illustrations of a creationist atlas, intended to make the thing seem scientific. And the FAZ worries that the ponds of German literature are overstocked: how to find the pickerel among all the herring?
read more

Tuesday 10 July, 2007

The taz takes a critical look at Nobel Prize-winner Muhammad Yunus' micro-credit banks. The NZZ visits Ghanaian writer and tax collector Amma Darko. Nazi-hunter Efraim Zuroff tells the FAZ that Eastern Europeans look away from their countries' complicity with murder. And some rich white rappers in Munich want the world to know: "your poverty pisses us off."
read more

Saturday 7 July - Monday 9 July, 2007

Imre Kertesz warns of the Apocalyptic abysses of Europe. The taz sees the Scythians exhibit in Berlin as a wonderful display of "Barbarians with style." The Süddeutsche Zeitung considers the Pope's call to revive the Latin liturgy. The Montreux Jazz Festival has little to do with jazz but it does make the chest hairs flutter.
read more

Friday 6 July, 2007

A Berlin retrospective of photographs by Cindy Sherman shows the artist in obsessive, moribund metamorphoses. To coincide with documenta, the FAZ looks at how Modernism is feigning puberty deep into old age. Biologist and author Stefan Klein warns democracy is at stake if Germany abandons German as a scientific language. And Die Welt gets all panicky listening to the new Tocotronic album.
read more

Thursday 5 July, 2007

Die Zeit is overjoyed that ecology has shed its stolid Germanness. Just three years after it burned down, the Anna Amalia Bibliothek, the jewel of German libraries, will reopen its doors. The taz takes another look at Johnnie To's classic of ritual barbarity 'The Election.' And an exhibition in Berlin glitters with the newly uncovered gold of the Scythians.
read more

Wednesday 4 July, 2007

Urbanist Jorge Mario Jauregui compares the favelas near Rio with a möbius strip. The first solo show of Joachim Patinir's paintings in 500 years reveals the surreal world of a contemporary. Author Artur Becker writes about the boom of Polish literature in Germany. And the widow of murdered journalist Hrant Dink tells the court about the forces of darkness in Turkey.
read more

Tuesday 3 July, 2007

At a recent reading, author Robert Menasse had the audience laughing till tears came to his eyes. Art theory is dead declares Beat Wyss. For Florian Henckel von Donnersmark, the man to play Count von Stauffenberg is Tom Cruise. And the poesiefestival in Berlin has shown the delights of poetry when it's pepped up with performance.
read more

Saturday 30 June - Monday 2 July, 2007

Author Lutz Seiler has won the prestigious Ingeborg Bachmann Prize with a story about a train. The feuilletons are happy with the decision but grumpy about the event. Dan Diner describes the efforts of the Islamic diaspora to align its legal system with that of the West. And Korean composer Unsuk Chin tells why she's made "Alice in Wonderland" into an opera.
read more