On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Saturday 29 July - Monday 31 July, 2006

Two more premieres in Wagner's "Ring of the Nibelung" cycle in Bayreuth: Watching the "Walkyrie", Joachim Kaiser warns against clever ideas, the "lice of directors." After "Siegfried" the FR can vouch for the quality of all singers present, apart from the star tenors, that is. The NZZ portrays gloom and doom manga artist Yoshihiro Tatsumi, who was never really interested in heroes. And philosopher Bernard-Henri Levy senses an unprecedented turn in Israeli life.
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Friday 28 July, 2006

Two operas are the buzz of the day. The SZ defends Nikolaus Harnoncourt's four-hour "Figaro" and marvels at Christine Schäfer's "gentle stroke" of a voice. The FAZ is thrilled with Tankred Dorst's staging of "Rheingold". After Alaa Al Aswany's novel "The Yacoubian Building" caused a sensation in Egypt, the film version now tells the 1001 stories of humiliation and deception on the silver screen. And actress Veronica Ferres explains why she refused to perform the one-woman play written just for her.
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Thursday 27 July, 2006

Bayreuth is back, with its overheated hall, long lines for refreshments, and heavenly music. Jesus an "Aryan"? The Nazis wanted it that way, and teens in Eisenach have created an exhibit on the Nazis' "de-Judaified" Bible. Orson Welles cherished his role as a poor, struggling artist, says director Mike Figgis. Israel simply has to defend itself, though there's no pretty way to do it, says historian Doron Rabinovici.
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Wednesday 26 July, 2006

The German railway explains why it prefers not to show an exhibition about over 150 deported Jewish children. Writer Zafer Senocak says the culture-clash antagonists should spend more time criticising themselves. The feuilletons are very taken with Johnny Depp's "not-a-pirate-film" pirate film. Plus a review of Johannes Maria Staud's "Music for Cello and Orchestra" and a portrait of the "unkissed eros," soprano Christine Schäfer.
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Tuesday 25 July, 2006

Egyptian author Alaa Al-Aswani tells why Egypt is an "as-if society," with an as-if president, an as-if parliament and as-if demure girls. Lebanese poet Abbas Beydoun calls Hizbullah's attacks on Israel a domestically-motivated putsch. Andrzej Stasiuk describes the fatigue beleaguering Polish society from the cradle to the grave. And the Salzburg and Bayreuth festivals kick off with paranoia, hopelessness and a good bit of gossip.
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Saturday 22 July - Monday 24 July, 2006

Israeli historians have the say today. Benny Morris sees Hamas and Hizbullah as links in a long Islamist chain of events, while for Moshe Zimmermann, Europeans should look to the home front before criticising Israeli nationalism. The website www.meinprof.de is giving German students an edge on their professors. The FR finds an exhibition of works by sculptor Arno Breker less a discussion than a mindless blathering. And Croatian writer Dubravka Ugresic has to pinch her heart at Tito's former prison camp.
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Friday 21 July, 2006

The NZZ looks at war reporters who discover they can't just swill down their traumas at the bar. The first solo exhibition dedicated to Arno Breker, Hitler's favourite sculptor, opens tomorrow in Schwerin. The SZ praises the show, while Die Welt writes not now, not here, and not with this curator! Israeli writer Meir Shalev points to uncertainties surrounding Israel's response in Lebanon. And Iranian filmmaker Mohsen Makhmalbaf explains why the truth is a shattered mirror.
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Thursday July 20, 2006

Mario Vargas-Llosa sides with Israeli critics of Israel in preferring the country's previous "moral superiority" to its present military one. For Syrian poet Adonis, Lebanon represents the only chance for secular society in the Middle East. The SZ takes a critical look at the summer's two mega festivals in Salzburg and Bayreuth. Dramatist Tankred Dorst talks of the gods and demigods on the margins of our civilisation. And the dream team Chabrol – Huppert keep the critics raving.
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Wednesday 19 July, 2006

Michel Friedman, former vice president of the Council of German Jews, says Israel's reaction to Hizbullah's attacks is proportionate. Both he and author Amos Oz blame Hizbullah for hiding behind civilians. Israeli historian Martin van Creveld says Israel isn't using enough force. The taz reports of increasingly lenient censorship in the Chinese film scene and the FAZ raves at master Claude Chabrol and his minimalist Isabelle Huppert in "Comedy of Power."
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Tuesday 18 July, 2006

German-Israeli historian Dan Diner explains why Israel is striking back so hard at Hizbullah, and Lebanese writer Hassan Daoud is ashamed of his country's government. Kathrin Passig feels like a bug caught in resin following the recent media frenzy around her person. Pieces of felt in honey jars motivated Nicholas Shakespeare to set his most recent novel in Leipzig. And Karlheinz Stockhausen is making quick progress on his "24 Hours of the Day."
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Saturday 15 July - Monday 17 July, 2006

Author David Grossman tells why Israelis have lost faith in the moderate Arab world. 70 years after the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, Spain is still split between a high-handed Right and a foggy Left, writes the FAZ. Congolese choreographer Faustin Linyekula explains why he has no use for traditional African dance. Turkish author Elif Shafak talks about being charged with "insulting Turkishness" in connection with her novel "The Bastard of Istanbul."
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Friday 14 July, 2006

At a conference in Switzerland, artificial intelligence advocates are debunking "good old fashioned AI" and going back to the worm, or alternatively to the human being. Writer Michael Kleeberg describes a cold coup d'etat in Lebanon. The FAZ takes a dim view of the new permanent exhibition at Berlin's German Historical Museum: tales of princes for white-bread visitors. And in the run-up to tomorrow's Love Parade, the FR is worried about the goood moood in Berlin where the message is: paaarty!
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Thursday 13 July, 2006

Author Cees Nooteboom tries to understand the man looking back at him in Rembrandt's self-portrait of 1658, while Bombay-based writer Kiran Nagarkar tries to accept that terrorism is not to be understood. Joke-tellers of the lower Rheinland are hoping to land on the Unesco heritage list, while the Confucius Institute in Berlin is hoping to disseminate the Chinese language and all that it expresses. And now, even couch potatoes can experience the redemptive satisfaction of a good head-butt.
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Wednesday 12 July, 2006

The NZZ presents the activists of the gender jihad, who seek to blend Islam and emancipation. Light is shed on Ingeborg Bachmann prize winner Kathrin Passig and her "Zentrale Intelligenz Agentur." The SZ tries to undertand the Polish lack of humour with respect to what the taz called their "new potato" of a president. And Berlin's cultural senator Thomas Flierl gets flack for neglecting the municipality of Berlin in favour of the nation's capital.
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Tuesday 11 July, 2006

Zinedine Zidane fills the feuilletons as they all wax lyrical about "the head-butt". According to Iranian dissident Akbar Ganji, the opposition in his country lacks just two things, an organisation and a leader. And by playing it safe, the Festival d'Avignon risks drowning in the Sargasso Sea of summer festivals.
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Saturday 8 July - Monday 10 July, 2006

Germany needs more, not less immigration, says Mike Davis. The Berliner Zeitung portrays Berlin resident Olafur Eliasson. The SZ looks at the frustrated attempts to establish stable arts locations in the Palestinian Territories. A devilish picture is emerging from US research into bosses with no Y chromosomes. And France is under the spell of a Cabala-canny cat.
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Friday 7 July, 2006

Fifty years after his death, the feuilletons remember Germany's modernist poet, Gottfried Benn. A year after the London bombings, the rift between Muslims and non-Muslims in Britain has widened. Mexican novelist Angeles Mastretta calls upon her fellow countrymen to get more politically pro-active. And there's a gobbet of gay gangsta gossip from Deadlee.
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Thursday 6 July, 2006

The Berliner Zeitung does not want Turks in the EU who cannot distinguish between fiction and reality. The Muslims of Europe conference in Istanbul offers a civilised platform for the war on terror. Die Welt looks at guerilla warfare and why modern armies are so ill-prepared to fight it. Poet Michael Lentz still can't sleep after Germany's defeat.
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Wednesday 5 July, 2006

The tageszeitung reports on how an article it had published on Poland's potatoes has seriously ruffled feathers there. Writer Ilija Trojanow examines the tangled web of organised crime and politics in Bulgaria. Filmmaker Jasmila Zbanic is happy that Bosnian Serbs are managing to see "Grbavica" by hook or by crook. And Navid Kermani writes on what is a good religion, or alternatively, what is the least bad religion.
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Tuesday 4 July, 2006

Alice Schwarzer declares the headscarf the flag of Islamism. The empire of Charlemagne strikes back in the World Cup. Berlin-Brandenburg hosts a tower of Babel of a conference on Europe. The theatre festival in Athens induces dionysian intoxication. And in his works Albanian writer Agron Tufa portrays the rotting souls in the post-communist rat race.
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Saturday 1 July - Monday 3 July, 2006

Poet Robert Gernhardt died in Frankfurt on Friday, and the papers praise the much-loved lyricist. Iranian dissident Akbar Ganji talks about his time in jail and the chances for democracy in Iran. Author Hans-Ulrich Treichel says he can't see anything autobiographical in his writings, because he can't see anything autobiographical in himself. The FAZ warns against being taken in by the harmless appearance of the Zentrale Intelligenz Agentur. And author Sonja Margolina is amazed at how integration-friendly migrants are treated in Germany.
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