On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Wednesday 31 January, 2007

Senegalese author Adama Gaye explains that Africans prefer to find inspiration in China's economic boom than worry about its human rights record. A South Korean court admits to having sent eight innocent men to the gallows. The new German film "Four minutes" took a year to find a distributor but is now wowing critics. And happy 70th birthday to Philip Glass, who taught us the joy of walking along a beach like a stoned beatnik.
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Tuesday 30 January, 2007

The taz says terms like "Islamophobia" push legitimate critique in the direction of discrimination. Author Wilhelm Genazino is amazed how many of his readers know what it's like to lose a body part. Documenta XII director Roger M. Buergel explains why Germany needs his concept of "bare life." And French philosopher Andre Glucksmann tells why he'll vote for Nicolas Sarkozy.
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Saturday 27 January - Monday 29 January, 2007

Psychoanalyst Franz Maciejewski explains why he thinks Sigmund Freud and his wife's sister Minna Bernay had a thing going on. Adam Yalomba and his 21-string kora were the big sensation at this year's "Desert Festival" in Mali. Philosopher Horacio Gonzalez tells what it's like to work inside the brutal-looking Argentinian National Library. And actor Milan Peschel extols the discreet charm of the East German provinces.
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Friday 26 January, 2007

Francois Zabbal, editor of Qantara, thinks that cultural amnesia is hindering the development of the Arab world. Urban planner Orhan Esen explains that Istanbul became a metropolis thanks to expanded squatters' rights. Jonathan Meese's directoral debut at the Volksbühne is a minor artistic revolution. And Berlin needs more wall space before it can show Andreas Gursky, whose photos rival the Old Masters in size.
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Thursday 25 January, 2007

TV journalist Birand Bingül calls on German Turks to do more for their own integration. Documentary filmmaker Andres Veiel says an early release of RAF terrorists Brigitte Mohnhaupt and Christian Klar would help young people understand their era. Internet journalist Arianna Huffington complains of the bankruptcy of mainstream media. And the FAZ announces preparations for the release of Ayaan Hirsi Ali's "Submission II," on homosexuality and the Koran.
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Wednesday 24 January, 2007

A wonderful show at the Sprengel Museum shows Ruff alongside Richter. In a re-printed article, the recently murdered Armenian-Turkish journalist Hrant Dink identifies the military and capital as the main forces for change in Turkey. The FAZ objects to a Catholic manifesto calling for a return of the Latin liturgy. And the fastest way to Russian Nirvana remains vodka.
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Tuesday 23 January, 2007.

In his last article (online in English), the murdered Turkish Armenian journalist Hrant Dink tells of the psychological torture he was subjected to before his death. The feuilletons respond angrily to German Film Academy head Günter Rohrbach's accusation that German film critics are autistic and insular. Japanese architect Kisho Kurokawa's National Art Center Tokyo has an entire pavilion just for umbrellas. And Wired founder Nicolas Negroponte says what the news will be like in thirty years.
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Monday 22 and Saturday 20 January, 2007

Die Welt prints a previously unpublished interview with Turkish-Armenian journalist Hrant Dink, murdered last week. The NZZ delves into Russia's relationship with Islam and tries to defend the thesis that the future belongs to Japan. Historian Fritz Stern proposes a memorial to the heros and not just the victims of the Nazi era and Tadeusz Borowski gets called one of the world's most important authors for his short stories from Auschwitz.
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Friday 19 January, 2007

Jörg Immendorff has painted ex-chancellor Gerhard Schröder as a gold-plated icon surrounded by monkeys. Uzbek civil rights activist Bachtior Chamrajew blames president Karimov for the rise of Islamism in Uzbekistan. Iraqi writer Najem Wali bewails the state of the Arab Writer's Union. And the natty new "Burkini" could revolutionise beach life for Muslim women.
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Thursday 18 January, 2007

Jacques Semelin, initiator of www.massviolence.org, explains why he avoids the term "genocide". China is still a developing country when it comes to alternative youth culture. For all its sex and drugs and rock'n'roll, Thomas Pynchon's "Against the Day" is a novel of redemption. And Germany is ready for "Shitdisco" the clumsy New Rave boy band from Glasgow.
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Wednesday January 17, 2007

Wolf Biermann is to be offered an honorary citizenship to Berlin despite much chain-rattling by GDR ghouls. The Cologne Furniture Fair played host to a selection of reasons to get out of the house. Muhammad Ali, the world's first rapper, turns 65 today. And Bulgarian writer Ilija Trojanow evokes the deeper essence of multiculturalism.
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Tuesday 16 January, 2007

Mexican writer Guillermo Fadanelli sings a hymn to the sordid delights of Mexico City's Tepito crime haven. The FR hopes that permanent carnival that is Bavaria won't come to an end with CSU leader, Edmund Stoiber's fall from grace. Cecilia Bartoli triumphs as Semele at Zurich's Opernhaus. And Germany's first silver-citizen horror movie hits TVs tonight, but not all demography experts are so black in outlook.
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Saturday 13 January - Monday 15 January, 2007

Romanian author Carmen Francesca Banciu on the wasp's nest Bucharest has become. The FAZ on the difficulties of interdenominational dating in Beirut. Hungarian-Serbian writer Laszlo Vegel on political mirages in Serbia, in the run-up next week's elections. The NZZ on the spread of Germany's favourite put-down: Opfer! And is the Russian secret service now sabotaging book reviews at Amazon?
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Friday 12 January, 2007

The French law that criminalises the denial of the Armenian genocide meets mixed reactions in Germany. Seventy years after his death, Karl Kraus finally enters the public domain, online. Die Welt casts aspersions on two studies that rate two thirds of Germans xenophobic. And the iPhone, while not absolutely necessary, is a very nice accessory indeed.
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Thursday 11 January, 2007

Political functionaries in Berlin shy away from awarding Wolf Biermann honorary citizenship. Libraries in Barcelona and Madrid are riding the wave of Google Books. Cees Nooteboom's most recent book on writers' graves is anything but morbid. And Helen Mirren is brilliant as the formidable and then crumbling edifice of the Queen.
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Wednesday 10 January, 2006

Three new buildings allow Ulm to do what so many cities aspire to: find its centre. Conductor Roger Norrington has cleansed Stuttgart's Radio Sinfonieorchester of vibrato, the wailing wall of the music world. That Turkish German lawyer Seyran Ates is not practicing law represents the failure of the constitutional state. And Die Welt portrays the late Yuri Levada, founder of Russia's VCIOM centre for the study of public opinion.
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Tuesday 9 January, 2007

A branch of the Louvre to be built in Abu Dhabi raises suspicions that France is selling its soul. Penguin Books takes on China with a two-pronged strategy. The American soldiers responsible for protecting German art after the war were known to have moments of weakness. And Gore Vidal reports on the sexual habits of his tribe.
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Saturday 6 January - Monday 8 January, 2007

Dani Levy's "Mein Führer" provokes much banter on the question of whether or not one can laugh about Hitler. The FAZ defends Ole Scheeren and other Western architects building in China; they just want to escape the shackles of Western tradition. The Munich Philharmonic gets called the best orchestra in the world. And Polish writer Andrej Stasiuk would take the catfish and pelicans of the Danube over the Netherlands and Belgium any day.
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Friday 5 January, 2006

Author Xu Xing describes Beijing as a city on Viagra. Philosopher Catalin Avramescu studies bus drivers and their pot-plant privacy in Romania. Helge Schneider, star of "Mein Führer", squirms uncomfortably when pushed for his opinion on the film. And the taz explains how to spot a high-ranking Qubaisiate member.
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Thursday 4 January, 2006

Angelina Maccarone's film "Verfolgt" takes a radically banal look at an S&M relationship. The weekly magazine Der Spiegel, which is celebrating its 60th birthday, doesn't pack the punch anymore. Spaniards are burying themselves in cement jungles while record numbers of Germans are converting to Islam. And with a bumper crop of videos and films, Germany is finally getting a kick out of Hitler.
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Wednesday 3 January, 2007

By botching Saddam's trial and execution, an unique opportunity for Iraqi reconciliation has been missed, says writer Najem Wali. The Berliner Zeitung visits the children and dinosaurs at the new Creation Museum in Kentucky. Theatre director Peter Stein distances himself from the intellectual flatulence of theatre's dullards. And the SZ seeks a link between architecture and morality, in vain.
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Tuesday 2 January, 2007

Leon de Winter welcomes the death of Saddam Hussein. Green Politician Helga Trüpel says Europe needs signandsight.com. The taz looks at Romania's split personality and at the new book by Alain Badious which is scandalously soft on communist dictatorships. Croatian writer Dubravka Ugresic likes her museums online and Iranian writer Amir Hassan Cheheltan reports on the latest censorship woes in Teheran.
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