On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Thursday 31 March, 2005

Painter Jörg Immendorff talks about life before death, French intellectuals ask if blacks can bash whites, Jorge Semprun calls for an end to public amnesia in Spain, and Thomas Winkler remembers West Berlin in the blessed 1980s.
read more

Wednesday 30 March, 2005

A scandal in the Moscow art scene; scandalously little in the Iranian cultural scene. In Paris, everyone's forgotten Sartre, while Jürgen Teller and Charlotte Rampling try to ensure that nobody forgets them.
read more

Saturday 26 March - Tuesday 29 March, 2005

Sonja Margolina reflects on the variety of historical takes on World War Two while Urs Schoettli laments the uncompromising one-take ideology of Hu Jintao. Plus: a premiere of Botho Strauß, a new album from "Wir sind Helden" and a birthday wish for "The New Yorker".
read more

Thursday 24 March, 2005

While Russia and Poland wage a media war, others prefer to savour water snake embryos in fine restaurants. The FAZ considers the euthanasia debate in the USA and Franz Walter reflects on Germans' waning spirituality.
read more

Wednesday 23 March, 2005

Jens Jessen sees narcissism as the cause of today's overwhelming interest in the Nazi era, Farhad Khosrokhavar looks at why integration has failed in France and Germany, Siggi Weidemann tells the true story of Dutch poet and resistance fighter Jan RT Campert, and Kerstin Holm visits a tank museum in Russia.
read more

Tuesday 22 March, 2005

Stefanie Schramm samples the delights of molecular gastronomy, the poet Adonis praises Lebanon for being democratic without having a democracy, Robin Detje raves about the 'Ivanov' production at the Berlin Volksbühne, Arno Widmann continues the taz series on Rudi Dutschke, Peter Sloterdijk philosophises on the internal space of world capital, and Aki Kaurismäki talks about killing his characters.
read more

Saturday 19 March - Monday 21 March, 2005

In Saturday's feuilletons, Götz Aly describes Nazi money laundering, Richard Brembeck discusses the directorship of the Bavaria State Opera, and Ralf Dahrendorf critices Isaiah Berlin's concept of liberty. Today, Gerhard Stadelmaier calls for a brave new staging of "Wilhelm Tell", Niklaus Hablützel enjoys a Hollywood "Parsifal" and Jens Bisky welcomes a new show of works by East German artist Bernhard Heisig.
read more

Friday 18 March, 2005

Today we take look at the publishing worlds in France and Britain and why Germans won't admit to reading detective novels. There's a rave review of a new docudrama on Nazi architect Speer, a description of the real-life drama at Milan's Scala theatre and a pat on the back for the cheeky curatorial moves at the Modern Art Museum in Frankfurt.
read more

Thursday 17 March, 2005

Hanno Rauterberg celebrates painter Bernhard Heisig's 80th birthday and Adolf Muschg confides his love for the city of Görlitz. Arnd Wesemann compares Western and Eastern ideas of beauty and Tilman Nagel compares Islam and Europe. Gerrit Bartels gives a sobering round up of German literature to mark the start of the Leipzig Book Fair, and Patrick Bahners fears the debate on German history may curtail public expression.
read more

Wednesday 16 March, 2005

Putin youth scream pornography while the Japanese morph into robots. Berlin exhibits nail art while Cologne boasts a large hole. And Aly and Tooze battle on...
read more

Tuesday 15 March, 2005

David Hermann stages Montiverdi's "Orfeo" with masks of Jimi Hendrix and co., Taiwanese author Chen Yu-hui tells of growing up on the "island of the gods", and Niklas Maak describes an exhibition of Thomas Demand's cardboard wonders at the New York MoMA. Elsewhere German and American libraries are compared, Macbeth is rehabilitated and Götz Aly defends his take on "Hitler's Volksstaat".
read more

Saturday 12 March - Monday 14 March, 2005

Louis de Berniere is feted, Götz Aly is torn apart and the public's waning understanding of Joseph Brodsky is lamented. A conservative politician manages to keep his cool in the RAF exhibition in Berlin, and a stupendous collection of 20th century literature in German translation risks being lost to Russia.
read more

Friday 11 March, 2005

Sieglinde Geisel tells of Emine Sevgi Özdamar's autobiographical fiction and bathing four in a tub in a 70s commune, Elke Buhr reviews an exhibition of conceptual art in Munich and Hakeem Jimo looks at new trends at the Fespaco Film Festival in Ouagadougou. "Eastblok" record label goes West and Harald Fricke reviews Daft Punk's latest CD.
read more

Thursday 10 March, 2005

Götz Aly's new book on "Hitlers Volksstaat" makes waves while Michael Klotz's latest documentary on embedded journalists in World War II makes one shudder. The Rausch Collection in Frankfurt garners praise, as do the demonstrations in Lebanon. And the debate on Berlin NS memorials simmers on...
read more

Wednesday 9 March, 2005

Peter Michalzik has discovered "a flower of paradise" in Frankfurt while Jürg Altwegg despairs that Jean Genet too was a Nazi; we also learn that Martin Walser preferred lukewarm to cold or hot, and that Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata should not be played sentimentally.
read more

Tuesday 8 March, 2005

Paul Ingendaay reports on the situation in Madrid a year after the bombing, Pascale Hugues bemoans the dreariness of International Women's Day in Germany, Wolfgang Kraushaar welcomes debate on Rudi Dutschke, Katarina Holländer gives some background on the "Avantgarde im Untergrund" exhibition in Bern, Kerstin Holm reports on unorthodox tactics of Russian priests to fill their churches and philosopher Ernst Tugendhat turns 75 today.
read more

Saturday 5 March - Monday 7 March, 2005

In the feuilletons on the weekend, Jan Philipp Reemtsma reviews the last volume of Walter Kempowski's collective war diary "Echolot", Else Buschheuer tells of her experience helping out in a Mother Theresa Home in Calcutta, Markus Meßling compares Western and Islamic ways of reading holy texts and Dagmar Zurek speaks with Nikolaus Harnoncourt about the sounds of today's orchestras. Today Jürgen Müller reports on erotic engravings in Dresden, Uwe Stolzmann visits Lake Inarijärvi in Finnish-Lapland and Charles Simic travels through the American South.
read more

Friday 4 March, 2005

The debate on Berlin's NS memorials continues. Lithuania's president talks about the unease of the Baltic states over the upcoming celebrations for the end of WW II in Moscow. The premiere of Elfriede Jelinek's play "Wolken. Heim. Und dann nach Hause" flops at the Berliner Ensemble, Muslim author Nedjma talks about sexuality in the Arab world, plus some snippets thrown in for fun.
read more

Thursday 3 March, 2005

In the weekly paper Die Zeit, Peter Kümmel investigates an East-West split in the German theatre scene and Klaus Dermutz talks with painter Anselm Kiefer about things ethical and artistic. Elsewhere, Dorothea Marcus visits an Iranian theatre festival, Dorothee Wenner reviews Farah Khan's new Bollywood hit, a heated debate starts in Berlin on what to do with the city's NS memorials, and Ulrich Baron recounts the cultural history of syphilis.
read more

Wednesday 2 March, 2005

In today's feuilletons, Mark Zitzmann commemorates the death of stormy and cynical French author Saint-Simon, Claudia and Uwe Dathe write on how Yushchenko's tactics paid off in the Ukraine, Hussain al-Mozany challenges Iraq's intellectuals, and Michael Braun speaks highly of Thomas Kling's latest book of poetry.
read more

Tuesday 1 March, 2005

In today's feuilletons there is a heated debate on student leader Rudi Dutschke among Germany's ageing left, a commentary by Götz Aly on Berlin's NS memorials, reviews of the Strauss Festival in Dresden and the Oscars in Los Angeles, and the first words of a new story by Elsa Morante.
read more