?From the great beyond into the present? ? an interview with Jo Lendle

Hanser publisher Jo Lendle talks about gentle adjustments of languages and marketing strategies.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Friday 28 September, 2007

Happy 800th birthday to Jalal da-Din Muhammad Rumi, inspiration of the whirling dervishes. American architect Richard Meier is taken to task for his Hans Arp museum and Cornelia Funke is chided for the unimaginative third volume of her Ink trilogy. The FAZ asks why Germans are putting all their linguistic eggs in the English basket.
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Thursday 27 September, 2007

Andre Glucksmann urges the West that nuclear war is brewing in Iran. The SZ praises Andrzej Wajda for lifting the shroud of lies over the Katyn massacre. And Ingo Metzmacher explains why he's chosen to open a concert series on the "German soul" with a work by Hans Pfitzner, who had close ties to Nazis in high places.
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Wednesday 26 September, 2007

Die Welt quotes Andre Gorz' hymn to his wife, with whom he committed suicide: at 82 "you're still beautiful, gracious, desirable." The SZ compares former revolutionary firebrand Hans Magnus Enzensberger with his own description of himself as "participatory observer." And director Fatih Akin anticipates response in Turkey to his latest film "On the other side."
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Tuesday 25 September, 2007

Italian anaesthetist Lina Pavanelli is convinced that Pope John Paul II opted for the soft death that he himself had condemmed as euthanasia. TV presenter Birand Bingül says the Turkish villages in German cities are in a 1960s time warp. Lebanese writer Jacques Naoum sees Lebanon's confessions drifting ever further apart. And Andrzej Wajda's film about the murders in Katyn has divided Polish audiences.
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Saturday 22 September - Monday 24 September, 2007

Pakistani journalist Shehar Bano Khan looks at the dire situation of women in Pakistani politics. Actress Hannah Schygulla explains the difference between fighting the good fight then and now. Photographer Letizia Battaglia describes the silent pact in Italy between the Mafia and the state. And Katharina Wagner tells why she should direct the Wagner Festival in Bayreuth: her sister-in-law and cousin are just too old.
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Friday 21 September, 2007

The FR sees how neighbours become murderers in newly discovered Auschwitz photos. "Fantastic Julia loves incredible Romeo" at the Thalia Theater in Hamburg. German rapper Textor fears for the negative impact downloading is having on musical taste. And Hou Hanru, the curator of the Istanbul art biennial has exhibited the city.
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Thursday 20 September, 2007

Writer Bernhard Schlink calls a recent government statement on shooting down hijacked planes "so wrong it hurts." Director Fatih Akin explains why his films are world cinema. Filmmaker Romuald Karmakar compares Imam Fazazi with Himmler. And 50 years after his death, Jean Sibelius' music still expresses the ultimate, inaccessible entity.
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Wednesday 19 September, 2007

Die Welt sat rapt throughout the 133 minute Islamist sermon in Romuald Karmakar's film "Hamburg Lessons". Moroccan sociologist Fatima Mernissi is confident in the democratising power of the pan-Arab satellite channel. Cardinal Meisner says the fuss over his term "degenerate culture" is all a big misunderstanding. And the Lucerne Festival looks set to have the world's first "Salle Modulable."
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Tuesday 18 September, 2007

Greek crime writer Petros Markaris experienced no catharsis after having sat through the tragic cycle that played out in his country. Cardinal Meisner has clarified the Church's view of modern art in speaking of "degenerate culture." And Rüdiger Safranski explains why 68 was a Romantic movement.
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Saturday 15 September - Monday 17 September, 2007

Documenta 12's curator is rapped on the knuckles for privileging "minorities" – the old, the non-Western, the woman (sic). The Archbishop of Cologne is doing wrong to the Christian art tradition, among other things, when he calls culture not committed to God "degenerate". Naomi Klein hits the nail on the head in her critique of Milton Friedman. And Ceclia Bartoli may be small and chubby, but she can really sing.
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Friday 14 September, 2007

Michael Ondaatje points out that many of the best English writers are Irish, Indians or Poles. Camorra researcher Roberto Saviano says East Germany was the Mafia's gateway to Eastern Europe. Soprano Cecilia Bartoli relates the horrors of touring Italy. And the latest trend in Bulgaria: rather than wasting money on bribes, businesspeople are simply founding their own parties.
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Thursday 13 September, 2007

Bulgarian nationalists want to have art historian Martina Baleva impaled for having de-romanticised the Batak massacre of 1876. Islamic reformer Tariq Ramadan childes German Muslims ignorant of the country's constitution. And Maria Callas is remembered, thirty years after her death, for her spontaneous versification of Verdi.
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Wednesday 12 September, 2007

Filmmaker Christian Petzold tells the Tagesspiegel that German cinema has stars but no sky. The FAZ sings the praises of his new film "Yella". With the death of Josef "Joe" Zawinul, the feuilletons laud the sole German native speaker among the gods of jazz. And the NZZ likens the Istanbul Biennale to a clump of ground meat.
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Tuesday 11 September, 2007

Iranian writer Said rages against a prominent and 'instant convert' to Islam. The Tagesspiegel looks at the 9/11 trauma through the eyes of Captain America. In Russia, the land of oil, gas and money, star architects are building in orgasmic proportions. And molecular biologist Max Schöler rejects the horror scenarios of stem cell research opponents.
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Saturday 8 September - Monday 10 September, 2007

Zimbabwe's leading writer Chenjerai Hove reminds the world that his people do not want to vote for a baboon. The final word on la Mostra is luke warm to say the least. Hans Werner Henze's new opera "Phaedra" has gripping moments of twelve-tone melodiousness. And the feuilletons continue their investigations into the seductive charms of Islam.
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Friday 7 September, 2007

Farewell Luciano Pavarotti, the only tenor who could outsing Titan Caruso - and he couldn't even read music properly. The mindset of the Islamic convert comes under the microscope in the wake of a foiled terrorist attack in Germany. French chanson singer Benjamin Biolay pooh-poohs the musical taste of his new government. And Karlheinz Stockhausen's "Gruppen" for three orchestras takes on a life of its own in Lucerne.
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Thursday 6 September, 2007

Die Zeit asks how to confront the new sexism which doesn't take misogyny seriously. The mass American therapy session that is the Venice Film Festival draws to a close among much moping and pill-popping. Frankfurt's Alte Oper dedicates a series of concerts to Estonian rock musician turned modern composer Erkki-Sven Tüür. And men play war and women play stupid men at the Kabul Theatre Festival.
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Wednesday 5 September, 2007

Thirty days after the kidnapping of German industrialist Hanns Martin Schleyer, the feuilletons look back at the violence of the Deutscher Herbst. Author David Grossman sings a hymn to the mercy of literature which stays us against the sins of the world. Matt Damon tells what the best directors have in common. And dadlit has been born on German soil.
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Tuesday 4 September, 2007

Terrorist researcher Walter Laqueuer takes stock of the vulnerable state of our world. The SZ celebrates the globalised newspeak in Manu Chao's new album. And Zeitkratzer fans can rejoice in the new CD of Lou Reed's Metal Machine Music.
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Saturday 1 September - Monday 3 September, 2007

German historian Heinrich August Winkler says the EU could do more to assuage Poland's fears for its sovereignty. Philosopher Rüdiger Safranski's book on Romanticism is far too German, says Die Welt. The FAZ gladly consents to the manipulative tactics in Brian De Palma's Abu Ghraib film. And writer Zafer Senocak looks down the long road to Europe that starts in Anatolia.
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