?From the great beyond into the present? ? an interview with Jo Lendle

Hanser publisher Jo Lendle talks about gentle adjustments of languages and marketing strategies.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Tuesday 31 May, 2005

Martina Meister looks at reactions in France to the French "non", Pascal Hugues describes the woe of French expats in Berlin, and the FAZ gathers reactions from within Germany and around Europe. In other stories, the feuilletons commemorate the 60th birthday of German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder who died 23 years ago.
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Saturday 28 May - Monday 30 May, 2005

China's students are too square to party, while the Turks are devouring 'Mein Kampf' and a number of nationalist trash novels. Slovakian writer Irena Brezna comes over all Freudian in Bratislava and Munich's new inflated dingy of a football stadium opens its doors today...
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Friday 27 May, 2005

Johannes Willms blames the French government for the anticipated 'non' to the European Constitution, Thomas Winkler cringes with embarassment at Mötley Crüe and Joseph Croitoru writes on a fiery dispute in Israel about Theodor Herzl.
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Thursday 26 May, 2005

Today is Corpus Christi, a holiday in Bavaria and Hessen, so Germany has churned out fewer papers. Nonetheless, we have a (not sufficiently) explosive exhibition on Belgium's colonial past, a sharp look at Franco's Spain, dismay at German film subsidies, and criticism of Catholicism in Eastern Europe.

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Wednesday 25 May, 2005

Paul Virilio conceives the European constitution as political fiction, Yuri Andrukhovych marvels at the impact of capitalism on his native Ukraine, Frank Goosen contemplates the fate of the Ruhrpott and Richard Kämmerlings dives into the Polish literary underground.
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Tuesday 24 May, 2005

Election fever rocks the German feuilletons. Everybody's talking about the new elections envisaged by Chancellor Schröder for the fall. And an exhibition of Romanic art from the Capetian dynasty is on display at the Louvre.
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Saturday 21 May - Monday 23 May, 2005

Juli Zeh asks the big questions behind the elections in North Rhine-Westphalia, and Frank Sen gives a prognosis of rising nationalism in Turkey, and the Golden Palm goes to the Dardenne brothers. On Saturday, Berlin's Academy of Art gets a glassy new home, and theatre of the down and out makes it big in Germany.
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Friday 20 May, 2005

Jean Baudrillard is cynical about the EU constitution being pushed through regardless of what the French vote, Peter Fuchs is embarrassed by a book and its author, Dankwart Guratzsch writes that Leipzig is shrinking in the wrong places, and critics are divided over Wim Wenders' most recent film.
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Thursday 19 May, 2005

Petra Reski reminisces about the SPD-run North Rhine-Westphalia of her youth and Wolfgang Ullrich pans the Ideal Worlds exhibition in Frankfurt. Alain Touraine links the French "No" to the forces of Gaullism and communism, critics are divided over Luk Perceval's staging of beer sex and incest drama "Turista" at the Vienna Festwochen, and Thomas Groß sums up the superlatives at the Eurovision Song Contest in Kiev.
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Wednesday 18 May, 2005

In Moscow, the farce of the Khodorkovsky trial would be funny were it not real life; in Cannes, Jim Jarmusch's comedy could earn the Golden Palm. Plus a new exhibition of Israeli art in Berlin, a new factory for BMW in Leipzig and a reconciliatory step in Turkish-Armenian relations.
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Saturday 14 May - Tuesday 17 May, 2005

Sex and blood from Cannes, a mobile phone upstages an entire play in Basel, and Norbert Bisky shows more paintings of blond young boys in Berlin. Rene Girard bolsters Joseph Ratzinger's critique of relativism, and Norbert Frei critiques how Germans see their past.
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Friday 13 May, 2005

All of today's feuilletons look at the "molar affair" surrounding the Holocaust memorial in Berlin. In other stories, one of Spain's foremost concentration camp victims admits he's a fraud, Michael Schroen reports on the "Sarajevo Winter" festival and German hiphop swings right.
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Thursday 12 May, 2005

While the German parliament debates the European consitution, a former Berlin culture minister fears that the current 'capitalism debate' in Germany could spark social unrest. Meanwhile, the Marx Collection - new and improved - returns to the Hamburger Bahnhof and German historians look down their noses at a new documentary on Albert Speer.
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Wednesday 11 May, 2005

A round of applause for Christoph Marthaler's production "Schutz vor der Zukunft", for Wolfgang Rihm's composition for the opening of the Holocaust Memorial, and for Klaus Bachler, the new artistic director of the Bayerische Staatsoper. The Federal Environmental Office, opened today, is a bright architectural island in dreary Dessau, and Claudia Klischat's latest novel shines out of the fog of young contemporary German literature.
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Tuesday 10 May, 2005

Stefan Reinecke reports on the new Holocaust memorial in Berlin, Frank Schirrmacher and Nils Minkmar talk with Albert Speer junior and Heinrich Breloer on the film "Speer and Hitler". Meanwhile Susanne Willems has discovered more evidence for Speer senior's guilt in Nazi atrocities, Christina Tilmann reports on the nominations for the German Film Prize, and Ingo Metzmacher plays a parting joke on audiences at the Hamburg Opera.
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Saturday 7 May - Monday 9 May, 2005

The 8th of May and the Schiller bicentennial are in hot competition. Who is more alive, Hitler or Schiller? What would Schiller have thought about "Speer and Hitler - the Devil's Architect"? Actors and directors squabble over why Schiller is not performed on German stages, philosopher Rüdiger Safranski discusses power and morals in Schiller's works, and Gerhard Matzig tells us the war of signs has already begun at the Memorial for the Murdered Jews of Europe.
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Friday 6 May, 2005

Götz Aly describes "Zero Hour" in Germany and Dirk Peitz describes a contested croissant shaped museum in Herford. Julius Schoeps tells how he felt walking through the new NS memorial and Germany's major theatre festival opens in Berlin.
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Wednesday 4 May, 2005

Günter Grass on the liberation of Germany, Jürgen Habermas on neo-liberal dogma and Andrea Breth on the power of power and why Schiller's Don Carlos should be in his prime. Mexicans are masters of improvisation, the West shows only tired interest in the Eastern European debate on the end of WWII, and female poverty is a breeding ground for Islamic terrorists.
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Tuesday 3 May, 2005

German intellectuals beg the French to bolster the 'yes', Ulrich Beck critiques neo-nationalism à la Dahrendorf and 'Leipzig Label' art has a dilapidated new home. Hans Christoph Buch sees warlords and scapegoats at work behind the burning of the Goethe Institute in Lomé, Wolf Lepenies looks at how notions of Germany changed after WW II while Harry Nutt investigates people who changed their identity at the same time. And Israeli comedians break holocaust taboos.
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Saturday 30 April - Monday 2 May, 2005

In today's feuilletons, Mariam Lau looks at the significance of war-end celebrations in Moscow for people in Eastern Europe, Salman Rushdie is still edgy when it comes to religion, and Chekhov's Cherry Orchard evokes extremely mixed reactions. On Saturday, Sonja Margolina comments on 60 years after WWII, Pham Thi Hoai comments on 30 years after the war in Vietnam, and Nikolaus Harnoncourt says you can't take the bucolic out of Bruckner.
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