Friday 29 December 2006

Nigerian writer Chris Abani describes the sweetly dripping blood of the megacity Lagos. Artist Andreas Slominski hoodwinks visitors in Frankfurt, with notions of children's skulls. An art documentary about Zidane gets into the player's socks. And lifestyle guru Tyler Brule bemoans the German magazine publisher's faith in the Rostock housewife.
read more

Thursday 28 December, 2006

Garry Kasparov analyses the divisive skills of his opponent Boss Putin. Ukrainian author Yuri Andrukhovych explains why his backward and isolated country is more than an ideal match for the EU. On the eve of his country’s EU accession, Romanian writer Mircea Dinescu can still hear a lot of rattling. And philosopher Felix Ekardt introduces jogging suit weltanschauung.
read more

Wednesday 27 December, 2006

The feuilletons mourn the death of James Brown and wish him lots of legroom in heaven. Gabriele Goettle portrays the life of a kiosk woman in West Berlin. The SZ looks at the Israeli knowledge gap regarding state boundaries. And a new exhibition in Berlin proves that Marx and Engels actually smiled.
read more

Friday 22 December, 2006

The rich history of Bulgaria and Romania catches the eye of Berthold Seewald in Die Welt. Barbara Spengler-Axiopoulos, in the NZZ, notes the precarious situation of Muslims in Thrace. The FAZ recalls artist Hans Haacke's unrequited confrontation with the Nazi past. Forget about copyrights:get creative, US copyright lawyer Lawrence Lessig tells the Süddeutsche Zeitung. And Diedrich Diederichsen in the Tagesspiegel says yes, pop music can grow old with dignity.
read more

Thursday 21 December, 2006

Aki Kaurismäki explains why he didn't go into politics. Writer Navid Kermani explains why Iran and Kafka are not mutually exclusive. Die Welt introduces the sleazy world of 20s Breslau, in the crime novels of Marek Krajewski. The NZZ is seduced by the derelict charm of Art Deco Reims. And speaking of walking the streets, how many ways can you say "prostitute" in German?
read more

Wednesday 20 December, 2006

Mozart's "Idomeneo" – where Muhammad loses his head - is back on the bill at Berlin's Deutsche Oper. The taz says a little hype can't hurt. The FR is scandalised. Mexican filmmaker Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu explains why Bush, Chavez and Paris Hilton are all in the same boat. The SZ looks at the liberating effects of black corpulence. And Die Zeit reports on the revolting millionaires at Lake Starnberg.
read more

Tuesday 19 December, 2006

A retrospective of the work of the Milanese architect Ignazio Gardella demonstrates the impressive breadth of his legacy. The FAZ reports that the ETA has been successful in chasing 200,000 Spaniards from their homes in the Basque country. Young art collectors of today are buying with abandon and on spec. And Morrissey gave his chest good exposure in Berlin on the weekend.
read more

Saturday 16 December - Monday 18 December, 2006

Jürgen Habermas praises the consensus-seeking American philosopher Ronald Dworkin. Ayaan Hirsi Ali explains that anti-Semitism in the Muslim world is a result of carefully-cultivated ignorance. Roger M. Buergel, artistic director of next year's Documenta, is hoping to bring a Louis Vuitton aesthetic to the exhibition. The NZZ lauds author Roberto Saviano's ethnographic fieldwork among the Camorrista in Naples. And at a festival of dance made in Berlin, everyone is trying to dance on the margins.
read more

Friday 15 December, 2006

Fears are up and Islam is down in a yearly study on the state of the German nation. If Asian cities came last in a recent politeness test, it's because Asians are polite in ways that don't exist in the West, writes the NZZ. A major exhibition of the treasures of Angkor has opened in Bonn. And although press censorship still exists in China, at least it's being talked about more openly.
read more

Thursday 14 December, 2006

Garry Kasparov reveals what he would have said about Putin's Russia on a German talkshow had he not been disinvited. Meanwhile Chinese television is teaching its viewers what makes a nation great. The photo agency Magnum is opening up to a broader public. And Russian journalist Elena Tregubova has disappeared from view, to the consternation of her German publishers.
read more

Wednesday 13 December, 2006

For Chilean playwright Ariel Dorfman, the burial honours shown to Pinochet bespeak a country still struck by fear. And Chilean writer Antonio Skarmeta sees the sense of melancholy in his country as the dictator's last victory. Bulgarian anthropologist Ivaylo Ditchev describes the rampant anti-European sentiment in his country on the eve of its joining the EU. And Canadian performer Robert Lepage caresses hatstands in Berlin.
read more

Tuesday 12 December, 2006

The computer programme Psiphon dodges Internet censors with new agility. An exhibition in Bonn on East and West German perceptions of each other de-politicises the dacha. German authors are called on to forget the middle class and plunge into the realm of the nouveau riche. And the donning of tails at the Nobel Prize ceremony in Stockholm is a source of comfort to the rolly pollyer guests.
read more

Saturday 9 December - Monday 11 December, 2006

The taz sees potential scandal in the photo of an aging and pregnant Annie Leibovitz. A year after the cartoon conflict, Scandinavia is still being rocked by the clash of cultures. The NZZ gives a Freudian explanation for why Thomas Mann was so enthralled with Wagner's music. And author Zafer Senocak tells why Turkish modernity is like a prefab house in a historic district.
read more

Friday 8 December, 2006

Writer Aka Morchiladze talks about a utopian Georgia that never bore the Soviet yoke. The NZZ looks at the media landscape in Lebanon and the flourishing Hizbullah-friendly Al-Akhbar daily. A new museum has opened to Otto Weidt, who ran a workshop for blind Jews under the Nazis. Young Prince Bernhard of Baden tells why he tried to sell off priceless Medieval manuscripts. And masked Berlin rapper Sido reveals a new social-realist side.
read more

Thursday 7 December, 2006

Wolf Biermann laments that Pinochet will die peacefully in bed. Andre Glucksmann remembers Anna Politkovskaya – and her fight against Russia's cancer. Actress Franka Potente tells how she combined magic and the Weimar Republic in her first film. And "The Saddest Music in the World" featuring Isabella Rossellini's glass beer-filled legs is now showing in Germany.
read more

Wednesday 6 December, 2006

Turner Prize winner Tomma Abts' paintings look like GDR wallpaper, fumes the FAZ. The FR, for its part, understands that some collectors might prefer her sense of understatement in their bedrooms to a Jonathan Meese. Martin Scorsese's Hong Kong thriller remake "The Departed" is too retro for the Tagesspiegel and laid on too thick for the NZZ. And the many theories on the death of Alexander Litvinenko are a reflection of just as many hobby-horses.
read more

Tuesday 5 December, 2006

The Berliner Zeitung thoroughly approves of the decision to give German painter Tomma Abts this year's Turner Prize. Chinese film director Lou Ye thinks his ban in China is nothing but a joke. The Zentrale Intelligence Agentur is back with powerpoint karaoke. Munich's Pinakothek der Modern has been lit up by a Dan Flavin retrospective. And Russia is in the grip of FSB fashion.
read more

Saturday 2 December - Monday 4 December, 2006

Mario Vargas Llosa is bowled over by importance of the toilet, as revealed in the UN water report. Amos Oz hopes the Israeli-Palestian ceasefire will hold, because, he says, everyone is agreed what a bilateral agreement would entail. Dissident poet Alina Vituchnovskaya praises Putin for regenerating Russian literature. Publisher Jochen Jung tells why German publishing houses all look the same. And physicist Lisa Randall explains that a word in physics is worth a thousand pictures.
read more

Friday 1 December, 2006

Russian author Viktor Erofeyev ponders over who will take the day in Russia, and pins his hopes on the emerging middle class. Conductor Daniel Barenboim explains why Italian composer Ferruccio Busoni is more German than the Germans. The FAZ is impressed by the dragon-woman / worm-man "Medea" production at the Deutsches Theater. And the SZ looks at who's getting fattest from splurging on art.
read more