?From the great beyond into the present? ? an interview with Jo Lendle

Hanser publisher Jo Lendle talks about gentle adjustments of languages and marketing strategies.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Thursday 31 May, 2007

"Art goes Heiligendamm" addresses border crossing in an abandoned shipyard a stone's throw from the G8 summit. For the SZ, the summit, like the GDR, has shrunk to the size of its fence. Ukrainian author Mykola Riabchuk defends his country's fledgling democracy. And the Tagesspiegel remembers how Günter Grass missed the point in 1967.
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Wednesday 30 May, 2007

Carlos Fuentes says Europe can learn from the "pluriculturalism of the Mestizos." Fatih Akin explains why he won't be protesting at Heilgendamm next week. An oratorio by Scarlatti dug up in a Naples music archive brings blockbuster material to the Salzburg Whitsun Festival. And two ZIA agents introduce the next big thing in the Internet.
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Saturday 26 May - Tuesday 29 May, 2007

The critics write contented from Cannes, happy not to have sacrificed the beach weather in vain. Jörg Immendorff has died after a long illness. The papers take stock of the life and works of this most flamboyant of painters. Author Thomas Brussig says it's not only German cylists that are doped up to their eyeballs, it's the entire literary scene as well. And the NZZ portrays literature in the land of the Comic Vampire.
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Friday 25 May, 2007

Colony Collapse Disorder, the uncanny diappearance of the bees, has the taz worried. Tatyana Tolstaya tells why the Russians always go back to square one. The soul races at Sasha Waltz' "Medea" in Luxembourg, but the dance is in slow motion. And an autobiography by comic book author Patrice Killofer has the author lost in a sea of ghastly doppelgangers.
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Thursday 24 May, 2007

The critics are raving about Cannes this year, and in particular Fatih Akin's competition entry with its cast of stars. Actress and Fassbinder widow Ingrid Caven gets her claws into the head of the Fassbinder Foundation, a woman "morally unsuited" for the job. Poles are venting their frustration with lustration over the Kapuscinski case. And Riccardo Muti tells how he discovered the dusty operas he's now breathed life into at the Salzburg Whitsun Festival.
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Wednesday 23 May, 2007

The late reporter and writer Ryszard Kapuscinski is Poland's latest lustration victim. Die Welt and the FR look through his secret-police files. Alfred Brendel remembers meeting the mousy, middle-aged piano magician Katja Andy, who turns 100 today. Fatih Akin raves in a letter from Cannes about the 3-minute shorts by great directors. And in the run-up to the G8 the SZ learns about protest-friendly make-up.
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Tuesday 22 May, 2007

At Cannes, Ulrich Seidl's battle with snowstorms, bureaucracy and shame, "Import/Export", is out front in the race for the Palms. Michael Winterbottom's new film has the FAZ worried that fiction might replace the documentary. Roman Polanski has told the critics where they can go. And Die Welt puts the record straight: Tintin was anything but a reporter.
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Saturday 19 May - Monday 21 May, 2007

Peter Stein's 10-hour Wallenstein marathon, which premiered on Saturday, provides ample fodder for the critics. For the FAZ, it "pulses and shakes," for the Welt it's a "church service to the classics." Opera diva Anna Netrebko recalls her childhood in communist Russia, when everyone knew the future would be bright. And an exhibition in Berlin honours Walter Kempowski's childhood wish "to be an archive."
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Friday 18 May, 2007

Wong Kar Wai's opulent "My Blueberry Nights" has opened the Cannes Film Festival, and critics are dismayed at its lush, American aesthetic. Director Peter Stein premieres his "Wallenstein" trilogy in Berlin tomorrow, based on the war that was "Afghanistan to the power of ten." And a Robert Gober retrospective in Basel shows the Madonna fitted with a drainpipe.
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Wednesday 16 May, 2007

Ayaan Hirsi Ali wonders why Timothy Garton Ash and Ian Buruma choose to defend Islam and not women in the multiculturalism debate.  Author Ilija Trojanow is outraged by how Björk treated Toumani Diabate and his country. Philosopher Jürgen Habermas makes a case for state funding of newspapers. As the Russian Orthodox Church consolidates, Die Welt is dismayed that it reflects Putin's hardcore patriotic course. And brain researchers explain how they know what we've decided before we do.
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Tuesday 15 May, 2007

Curator Ruth Noack defends documenta 12's new Aue Pavillion, which was built on the cheap. The NZZ describes the European value canon as herring dangling from the ceiling. Die Welt is disappointed by Don DeLillo's desire not to disappoint in his new 9/11 novel. And the SZ looks at some thoroughly dogdy-looking online art investment portals.
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Saturday 12 May - Monday 14 May, 2007

Adam Michnik writes a tale of two Polands. Amartya Sen has inspired the FAZ to argue the case for cultural relativism. The FR has had its fire lit by a student poetry magazine. Films will be strictly back in the cinema at this year's documenta and at Cannes, they will excavate the borders of the mind.
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Friday 11 May, 2007

Libyan author Ibrahim al-Koni writes impassioned about the curse of oil. Writer Amos Oz has harsh words for the Israelis concerning Palestinian refugees. Philosopher Boris Groys discusses the Soviet memorial dispute and the ethnicisation of communism. And writer Najem Wali remembers the notorious German chair on which the Syrian poet Faraj Bayrakdar was tortured.
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Thursday 10 May, 2007

Ayaan Hirsi Ali says the West should save Turkey from Islamisation, with the help of the Turkish army if nececesary. Elif Shafak writes that Turkey prefers to save itself. The FAZ visits a number of independent journalists in Moscow, a dying breed so to speak. The German theatre is like an olive of pure art, writes Die Zeit. And US artist Roni Horn gives a tour of her museum of water in Iceland.
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Wednesday 9 May, 2007

Romanian DramAcum is making big impact at Heidelberg's Stückemarkt forum for young playwrights. Theatre director Peter Stein tells how his actors help him discover the eternal in the classics. The SZ dances to the Independance Cha-Cha. Documenta 12 will practice what d 10 only preached. And art stars will barely get a look in.
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Tuesday 8 May, 2007

Die Welt talks about Sarkozy's cultural objectives. Painter Daniel Richter tells why artists are on stabler ground than musicians and writers. Love songs from gastarbeiters are blaring out of loud speakers at the Sharjah Biennale. Thomas Pynchon turns 70 today and, says the SZ, his books float by like clouds. 
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Saturday 5 May - Monday 7 May, 2007

Single-city Munich has nixed architect Kazunari Sakamoto's Wiesenfeld settlement. Daniel Richter's lecherous flaneur dwarf is the highlight of his Hamburg retrospective. Elfriede Jelinek's new play rhythmically documents the interweaving of Business Deutsch and baby-speak in the recent call-girl affair in Vienna. And Gabriele Goettle visits a tattoo artist who recalls a customer's delight at her bell-end embellishment.
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Friday May 4, 2007

Orhan Pamuk reads page-long sentences piling up images of his cherished Istanbul. Andre Glucksmann puts in a last plug for Nicolas Sarkozy. The NZZ presents Islam's most popular satellite preachers, and Spiegel Online wags a finger at America-equals-fascism bashers.
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Thursday 3 May, 2007

It "pisses off" Croatian writer Edo Popovic that wherever you go in the world, you find the same beers and restaurant menus. Historian Tony Judt is missing Jacques Chirac before he's even left office. The FAZ doubts that the Hungarians are going to appreciate tripping over Günter Demnig's symbolic Stolpersteine. And twenty years after the making of "Wings of Desire," Wim Wenders feels that Berlin is worth living in again.
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Wednesday 2 May, 2007

The critics are wowed by Russian pop-opera diva Anna Netrebko in Vincent Paterson's L.A.-based "Manon". Arnold Schwarzenegger introduces an electric car that leaves Porsches biting the dust. Philosopher Michael Theunissen reveals the perfidies of Christianity. And on the start of his German tour, writer Orhan Pamuk speaks out on Turkish secularism.
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