On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Friday 30 December, 2005

Ten years after the death of playwright Heiner Müller, his body of work is inspected for signs of life. 250 years on, Mozart is far more alive - and life-changing. In the dog-eat-dog world of pop music, SonyBMG is the Rottweiler of 2005. And Daniel Barenboim tells of his formative first cigar experience.
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Thursday 29 December, 2005

While the FAZ reports how Iraq's elites are slowly being wiped out, Orientalist Walter Sommerfeld praises work done there by archaeologist and recent hostage Susanne Osthoff. Peter Greenaway detects a murder conspiracy in one of Rembrandt's most famous paintings. And Poet Helga M. Novak tells how she found her writing style in a Swiss mental home.
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Wednesday 28 December, 2005

Berlin is rediscovering Max Reinhardt, who shaped the city's theatre scene in the early 20th century. In Istanbul the Eczasibasi and the Sabanci families are one-upping each other in private arts funding. Heinrich August Winkler sheds doubt on Turkey's Western outlook. And Julian Nida-Rümelin says neither Einstein nor Wittgenstein would make it in Germany today.
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Saturday 24 December - Tuesday 27 December, 2005

The FR reports from the "36 x 27 x 10" impromptu show of contemporary art in Berlin. Gabriele Goettle tells of gruesome tests to establish brain-death in coma patients. Najem Wali sees Iran gaining regional hegemony on the way to a Greater-Iran. Steven Spielberg's "Munich" is a more-often-than-not successful insight into human anguish. And Taiwanese and Korean families protest the victimisation of their dead relatives in a Japanese shrine.
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Friday 23 December, 2005

Jan Philipp Reemtsma, himself held hostage in 1996, speaks out firmly against legalising torture. For the NZZ, Austria's 'jubilee year', which was promoted as a year of commemoration and thinking, failed miserably on the second account. The redistribution of power in China is taking on Kafkaesque dimensions. And Germany's pop landscape next year will be beset by boys dressed as girls dressed as boys.
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Thursday 22 December, 2005

The FAZ prints a patriotic trench Christmas piece by Robert Musil, and reports on the "last sensation" of the year in Berlin's new White Cube. Polish author Pawel Huelle demands that Poland deal with its communist legacy. Polanski's "Oliver Twist" is an ode to meaninglessness and Christoph Schlingensief expounds on his Wagnerian ear infection.
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Wednesday 21 December, 2005

Die Zeit traces the French mood of catastrophe back to de Gaulle's better-late-than-never WWII victory. Almost 265 years after it was penned, Voltaire's play "Mahomet" is still offending people. Ethiopian Prince Asfa-Wossen Asserate demands that Western governments only support his country on the condition of democratic behaviour. The taz congratulates former hostage Susanne Osthoff for staying in Iraq, while the exhibition "The Iraqi Equation" shows what the CNN leaves unmentioned.
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Tuesday 20 December, 2005

Germany was never more German than in the mid-fifties but an agreement signed on December 20, 1955 soon put an end to all that. Women writers are providing a valuable public forum for women in Zimbabwe. Jah's Jew, Matisyahu, explains why he had to stop stage diving. And the fifth Beatle, Klaus Beyer, has released a new CD - "Helft!".
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Saturday 17 December - Monday 19 December, 2005

Spain's conformists and eccentrics cannot break the "pact of forgetting". In Austria, prose is undergoing a renaissance that beats the pants off German literature. In Denmark, the intellectuals are finally stirring from their sleep of ignoring racist policy. In Russia, the death toll is ringing for democracy. And in the world of theatre, Andrea Breth has pulled off a "grandiose near-miss" and Christoph Marthaler's "fruitfly" posits feelings as the new opera.
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Friday 16 December, 2005

All Holocaust memorials are worthless, says the FAZ, if the international community fails to sanction Ahmadinedjad's inflamatory remarks. EU politician Daniel Cohn-Bendit says Iran should be kicked out of the World Cup or at least made to play Israel. Plus, a German team hopes to replenish the cultural landscape in Iraq with a new radio station.
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Thursday 15 December, 2005

On the eve of his trial, Orhan Pamuk reiterates his statements on the Turkish genocide of the Armenians and speaks out against the virulent nationalism of the non-Western middle class. Star lawyer Alan Dershowitz calls for torture to be brought out of the dark. Anti-Semitism stands before a new and evil dawn. And we hear how contemporary art became a monster and why Kate Moss is needed now more than ever.
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Wednesday 14 December, 2005

Sociologist Wolf Lepenies talks to Kenzaburo Oe about Mao Zedong's nasty smoking habits. In Korea, the history of the "chin-il-pa" - those who collaborated with the Japanese occupiers - is finally being addressed. And The Strokes' debut album may have made them immortal but not necessarily successful.
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Tuesday 13 December, 2005

The FAZ takes a look at Gerhard Schröder's new life in Switzerland and the people who made it possible. Europeans gear up for the coming onslaught of fractionated wines from the USA. Slavenka Drakulic reports on Croatia's mixed feelings about the arrest of General Ante Gotovina. And Washingon and Heilbronn celebrate Adolf Cluss, the German communist who built much of the American capital.
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Saturday, 10 December and Monday, 12 December, 2005

The Berlin Philharmoniker are behaving like bratty schoolkids with their conductor Simone Young, while Gidon Kremer's new Bach recording is a flawless sensation. Actor Götz George yearns for a little more Hollywood-style luxury in German film production. Rene Pollesch's most recent play addresses such important questions as why porn actors look into the camera when they're doing their thing. And Rome's suburban monster is alive and well.
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Friday 9 December, 2005

Harold Pinter uses his Nobel Prize acceptance speech as an opportunity to rant against George Bush. Some critics found it impressive, others tedious. An artists's colony in Beijing is flattened to make way for the 2008 Olympics. And the post-Muti era begins at the Scala with a dramatic if flawed performance of Mozart's "Idomeneo".
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Thursday 8 December, 2005

Günter Grass defends the artist's right of the first born. Die Zeit wonders whether it's nostalgia or a fascination with the "aesthetic of evil" that has directors across Europe staging Euripides' "The Bacchae". The taz calls Udo di Fabio's new neo-conservative book the dumbest work of recent times, and French sociologist Dounia Bouzar ascribes the recent riots in French suburbs to a total lack of culture.
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Wednesday 7 December, 2005

For Tony Judt, the pro-Washington stance of the Ossis is a knee-jerk reaction to their communist past. Gregor Schneider's Kaaba-esque cube is now being verboten in Germany. Dada is not looking even the slightest bit dusty in the Pompidou. And world's "largest ever" show of light art in Karlsruhe is blindingly bling.
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Tuesday 6 December, 2005

Kanan Makiya says Iraq can profit from Gemany's experience with the East German Stasi achives in classing documents from the Saddam era. There's no sign of Heimat romanticism at a new exhibition on "Escape, Expulsion, Integration" in Bonn. Viktor Erofeyev visits a former Gulag in northern Siberia with its coquettish police station, and the Tagesspiegel says that the French rap being blamed for the rioting has nothing on the Marseillaise.
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Saturday 3 December - Monday 5 December, 2005

Berlin cabaret singer Max Raabe goes down a riot at the Carnegie Hall. German Wikipedia is blinded by communist nostalgia, while the entire site is under attack from the ad industry. Hannah Arendt is the Madonna (Madge, that is) of philosophy. Khalid al-Maaly cringes at Saddam's Koran brandishing in court. And after the rioting in the banlieues, French politicians come down hard on "injury to France".
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Friday 2 December, 2005

A new film by Argentine director David Mauras lends weight to the theory that Walter Benjamin did not in fact kill himself. Gerhard Schröder meets his new cabinet - the editorial board of a Swiss publisher. The FAZ argues for a German Centre Against Expulsion while the taz wonders what preacher singer Xavier Naidoo is on about. And a KGB-trained virus hunter describes virtual warfare.
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Thursday 1 December, 2005

Günter Grass invites fellow writers for collegial discussions, but no geniuses allowed. The feuilletons congratulate Woody Allen on his 70th birthday, but only the taz celebrates Jean-Luc Godard's upcoming 75th. Despite work by the recently kidnapped archaeologist Susanne Osthoff, Germany is a haven for stolen Iraqi antiques. And Philippe Roizes says that far from playing the gangsta, French rappers are role models for the young.
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