On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Tuesday 31 January, 2006

The FAZ says more self-esteem will facilitate integration in German schools. Geert Mak says Germans can avoid "Dutch fever" with a balanced diet of toleration. The NZZ discovers manga master Kotobuki Shiriagari at the Angouleme Comic Festival. The FR praises the late video artist Nam June Paik, and filmmaker Rolf Peter Kahl is inspired by Godard's playful early films.
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Saturday 28 January - Monday 30 January, 2006

Hassan Khader fears a Palestinian brain-drain. Navena Widulin tells of Bosnian gallstones and mass graves. The FAZ asks why German theatre is so drenched in blood. Alexander Stille explains the Berlusconi phenomenon with a muscular metaphor and Berlinale director Dieter Kosslick is thrilled to be faced with a glut of good German films.
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Friday 27 January, 2006

On Mozart's 250th, can we be sure that contemporary audiences could tell the difference between his music and that of his most esteemed and now forgotten contemporaries? And isn't it time to stop raving about his dirty jokes? Two exemplary South Korean websites are under the spotlight. And the first German school has introduced German-speaking only in the playground.
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Thursday 26 January, 2006

Die Zeit has checked out a very hot Afrorap scene in Lagos, while the FR couldn't get enough of Karl Lagerfeld's haute couture show in Belle Epoque Paris. Michel Haneke's film "Cache" is knocking the socks off critics, and Daniel Kehlmann is being called Germany's new literary star. Meanwhile, Berlin is profiting from a creative Dane drain.
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Wednesday 25 January, 2006

Steven Spielberg's "Munich" hits the screens in Germany tomorrow. The FAZ raps Spielberg's knuckles for making an unbelievable, unoriginal film. The SZ says it's Hollywood's best and Die Welt is happy Spielberg drops his smoothness and gives his talent free reign. Dario Fo finds Berlusconi's Pinnochio Prize entirely fitting, and Jung Chang remembers Jiang Qing saying she was Mao's dog.
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Tuesday 24 January, 2006

The taz covers the latest music trend: Turkish-German Arabesque music. Don Quixote minus Sancho Panza equals the Ukrainian president, writes Andrey Kurkov. Ahmed Alaidy wonders why the German guests of honour at the Cairo Book Fair are snubbing a former publishing pal. And a choreography by Sasha Waltz is inspiring new medical research.
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Saturday 21 January - Monday 23 January, 2005

Historian Götz Aly calls for the EU to counter the Holocaust conference in Iran. Philosopher Otfried Höffe calls for more communication between European media. Kosovar writer Beqe Cufaj's obituary of Ibrahim Rugova picks some holes in the peace-loving myth. And there are thoughts on the non-starter of a love affair between music and the Internet and why twenty years after his death, Joseph Beuys has lost his redeeming glow.
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Friday 20 January, 2006

Iraqi writer Ibrahim Al-Hariri describes his new obsession with decapitation. Mario Vargas Llosa is concerned about a wave of reverse racism now that Bolivia has its first 'Indio' president. Austria is starting to feel the backlash for its six-year refusal to budge on the 'looted' Klimt paintings, and Baden Baden has been blessed with luminous show of paintings by Marlene Dumas.
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Thursday 19 January, 2006

Michael Haneke talks about his film "Cache" and the 200 skeletons in France's closet. Die Zeit proposes an alternative citizenship questionnaire: "You beat woman?" Hammam Hout's play "Sorry America" comes down hard on Syrian nepotism. And the taz uses Freud to explain problems with ex-girlfriends.
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Wednesday 18 January, 2006

Tony Kushner says he wasn't sloppy at all in writing the "Munich" screenplay. Performance artist Rabih Mroue tells a mystery tale about the death of a tax collector. The FR is not impressed by modernistic church architecture, while the SZ rubs its hands at the Arctic Monkeys' debut album. The House of the Wannsee Conference sheds new light on the way to the Final Solution. And Catalan nationalism is taking things too far.
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Tuesday 17 January, 2006

Russian intellectuals suspect that Angela Merkel will learn to turn a blind eye to what's going on in their country. Actress Zhang Ziyi describes the trauma of being shown the general's kimono collection in "Memoirs of a Geisha." The FR laments the widspread acceptance of surveillance cameras and the taz regrets that the middle class is no longer capable of thought.
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Saturday 14 January - Monday 16 January, 2006

Die Welt is upbeat about the tearing down of Berlin's Palast der Republik to rebuild the city palace. Bahman Nirumand is delighted by the light-hearted optimism of Iranian blogs. Necla Kelek is all for the "Muslim Test" in Baden-Württemburg. Irene Dische calls her own kids fellow travellers. The taz analyses the one-man book business called Marcel Reich-Ranicki. And the NZZ reports from a wax museum-type memorial to the Chinese nation.
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Friday 13 January, 2006

Former Polish dissident Adam Michnik is raising eybrows for his cozy relationship with the post-communists. Die Welt rhapsodises over Asian actresses. And while Islamic lifestyle websites are booming, nobody seems to be up and coming on the Swiss literature scene.
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Thursday 12 January, 2006

Richard Swartz and Rolf Gustavsson say we should view Europe more like a work in progress than a Utopia. Robert Rauschenberg tells why his turtle is the best art critic he knows. Die Zeit reports on David Bösch, leading representative of the "post-post" generation of theatre directors for whom catharsis and pathos are no longer taboo. The taz sees a Western guilt complex in "The Constant Gardner" and the FR says we need our film pirates.
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Wednesday 11 January, 2006

Director Patrice Chereau explains how cinematic Joseph Conrad is and Meir Shalev sees Ariel Sharon as a shepherd. The director of documenta 12 plans to break with courtly traditions. Coca Cola suffers at the hands of principled college students. And historian Gerd Koenen reflects on the impact of Islamic terrorism.
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Tuesday 10 January, 2006

Eyal Weizman wonders why Ariel Sharon was not given the Pritzker Prize in architecture, while Hassan Khader tells what Sharon and Bertold Brecht have in common. Katharina Wagner's staging of Puccini's "Il Trittico" goes boulevard in the third act. And Lars Henrik Gass tells how DVDs have taken the delicious danger out of film.
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Saturday 7 January - Monday 9 January, 2006

For Tom Segev, the "last Titan" Ariel Sharon showed Israeli settlements can be evacuated without the sky falling in, while Natan Sznaider looks at the pro-Israel, anti-Sharon stance of global morality. Daniel Goldhagen suggests Turkey could follow Germany's example when dealing with its past. Andrzej Stasiuk tells how the West has moved East. And for Laszlo Földenyi, 50 years after the Uprising the Hungarians are still drinking the elixir of amnesia.
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Friday 6 January, 2006

Yossi Melman and Steven Hartov lambast Steven Spielberg for basing "Munich" on fictions rather than the living facts, while a German documentary suggests that Lee Harvey Oswald was working for Cuba when he killed John Kennedy. The sensational Mao biography by Chang/Halliday backfires in China. And Icelanders express thier patriotism through procreation.
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Thursday 5 January, 2006

Die Zeit runs a whole section on Mozart, the human powder keg. Daniel Barenboim tells how playing music with the enemy can change your life. Canadian pop freaks from the middle of nowhere are making it big. And in a remarkable turn of events, Merkel's pragmatism heralds new optimism from the depths of post-Schröder Germany.
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Wednesday 4 January, 2006

There's much praise for Andreas Dresen's soulful, no nonsense film "Summer in Berlin", and an interview with screenwriter Wolfgang Kohlhaase on Berlin's colourful Prenzl'berg district. Andrey Kurkov, Oksana Zabuzhko and Mykola Riabchuk comment on Ukraine's gas dispute with Russia from a writer's perspective. And choreographer Marco Goecke was influenced by Pina Bausch even before he was born.
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Tuesday 3 January, 2006

There was a distinctly East German aftertaste to Angie's New Year speech, and the row between Russia and Ukraine over gas is but a foretaste of things to come for the EU. Architect Ieoh Ming Pei tells why quality beats brand in a building and the "Three Emperors" exhibition in London reveals the connection between culture and power.
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Saturday 31 December, 2005 - Monday 2 January, 2006

For Peter Ensikat, history will repeat itself when the East German Palast der Republik is torn down to make way for a copy of the old royal palace. After a 25-year break, Throbbing Gristle presents its new album in Berlin. Bora Cosic reflects on Gerhard Schröder's liking for Sinatra schlock. And Alfred Brendel says you've got to be true to the music to be true to yourself.
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