Friday 25 - Thursday 20 April, 2009

Jonathan Franzen enthuses about obfuscation in "Peeling the Onion".The cabaret artist Johnny Klinke fondly recalls his time sweating on the production line at Opel. The SZ goes underground with "Les Untergunther". In his blog, philosopher Abdolkarim Sorous explains why God was formless for the Persian poet Rumi. The FR was impressed by the hilarious thoroughness in the Romanian films at the GoEast festival. The NZZ inspects the dire situation of the Roma in Eastern Europe. And has art got a bad case of helper syndrome?
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Saturday 18 - Friday 24 April, 2009

Russian poet Olga Martynova explains how the KGB reinvented the Orthodox Church. Die Welt takes on the environmental group which is fighting to ban DDT. Darwin biographer Jürgen Neffe celebrates the future spirit of the book, unfettered by a physical body. Dutch writer Adriaan van Dis puts his faith in civil society to help pull South Africa out of the wetsand. The FR explains to 1,3000 German scholars, writers and publishers why they need Open Access. And the NZZ speculates on the poisonous contents of Chinese banks.
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Saturday 11 - Friday 17 April, 2009

Hungarian authors Peter Nadas and Peter Esterhazy see black for their country. Sonja Zekri visits Kyrgyzstan, a state blessed with both scenic and geopolitical charms. There are depressing reports in from the pile of rubble that was once the Cologne City Archive. Jungle World asks what the UN understands by "defamation of religions". Alice Schwarzer draws attention to a blind spot in the media coverage of the Winnenden shootings: eleven of the twelve kids shot in the classroom were girls. And the old Kanzlerbungalow in Bonn opens to the public: the house that launched a thousand "democratic" buildings.
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Saturday 28 March - Friday 3 April, 2009

The FR picks through the remains of GDR literature. A symposium in Marburg celebrates the 80th birthday and lifetime achievement of the "Jürgen Habermas" of German poetry. Swiss author Urs Widmer explains why his compatriots were so shocked by tone of the German finance minister - it was just like the way an average German orders bread. The NZZ listens to the protracted diminuendo of the (Japanese) piano maker Bösendorfer. And the German copyright agency GEMA has taken on Youtube - to the detriment of German record labels and musicians.
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