?From the great beyond into the present? ? an interview with Jo Lendle

Hanser publisher Jo Lendle talks about gentle adjustments of languages and marketing strategies.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Saturday 28 April- Monday 30 April, 2007

The guest list to the second Islam Conference in Berlin is still up in the air while a conference in Bulgaria on the massacre of Batak is falling apart entirely. Meanwhile Scotland's separatist spirit is waving in the wind. Probably totally unfounded rumours abound about Suhrkamp and Stanford. And the art scene in Damascus is not exactly flourishing.
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Friday 27 April, 2007

Iraqi writer Abbas Khider points out that the culture of violence in Iraq stretches back decades. Die Welt predicts paper will one day back up the digital databases currently replacing it. Stage director Peter Stein is bucking the trend to "directors' theatre" in a Berlin cold storage facility. And a Wikipedia-basher tells why she won't cite the online encyclopaedia.
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Thursday 26 April, 2007

Theatertreffen juror Christine Dössel proclaims the end of the era of German blood and sperm theatre. Die Zeit visits Erwin Wurm in Vienna and discovers his to be a humour born of desperation. The FR has observed certain German neo-Nazi sympathies for militant Islam. And after the premiere of Christoph Schlingensief's "Flying Dutchman" in Brazil, the FR asks: where on earth are the sailors?
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Wednesday 25 April, 2007

On the eve of the Islam Conference in Berlin, Feridun Zaimoglu has harsh words for "right-wing feminists" like Necla Kelek, who also has her say. Writer Peter Rühmkorf still can't work out why women were so drawn to that revolting Andreas Baader. For Diedrich Diederichsen, David Lynch's new film is just impossibly Lynchian. And 200 years after it was published, Kerstin Decker gives a whirlwind tour of Hegel's "Phenomenology of Spirit" and a few tips on how to read it.
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Tuesday 24 April, 2007

Barrie Kosky has staged Gluck's "Iphigenia in Tauris" with a horde of naked pensioners. Emel Abidin-Algan reflects on the prophets, God's PR men. The FR was at the Fondazione Prada in Milan to watch Thomas Rehberger's "On Otto", a star-studded film made in reverse. And gallerist Dagrun Hinze was driven by desperation to start food fights at the Art Cologne.
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Saturday 21 April - Monday 23 April, 2007

Writer Viktor Erofeyev takes an uneasy look at nascent Russian theocracy. The taz sees Pope Benedict's "Jesus of Nazareth" as a symptom of the Church in crisis. Documenta 12, says artistic director Roger M. Buergel will take on the western middle classes. And ex-Guantanamo prisoner Murat Kurnaz has written a book about his five years of torture.
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Friday 20 April, 2007

Turkish-German author Zafer Senocak describes the pogrom mood gripping Turkey, while Algerian writer Habib Tengour laments his government's unwillingness to face the fact that the country is in a state of civil war. The FR discovers that as a journalist, one is never in want of company in Chinese-occupied Tibet. And the garden cafe of the Goethe Institute in Kolkata has witnessed many a deep conversation and the occasional tipped-out cup of tea.
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Thursday 19 April, 2007

Gary Kasparov decries Berlusconi's and Schröder's pandering to Putin. A film school in Iraq has learned to censor itself, now that Saddam's no longer around to do the job. The Süddeutsche Zeitung tries to extract meaning from Virginia shooter Cho Seung-Hui's fantasies to choke his stepfather with a granola bar. And Die Zeit draws attention to Russian virtuoso pianist Grigory Sokolov, which is exactly what he doesn't want.
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Wednesday 18 April, 2007

Democracy in Russia is like the "Truman Show," states the Berliner Zeitung. Choreographer Johann Kresnik has staged one of the worst productions in Germany, writes the SZ, while a new "Valkyrie" in Weimar is one of the best. And author Georg Klein makes some sharp distinctions on rereading Friedrich Dürrenmatt.
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Tuesday 17 April, 2007

Margriet de Moor hopes that Islamic women in Europe will profit from the West's obsession with sex. Sonja Margolina is tired of seeing Russians treated as vegetables by their leaders. Egypt is fed up with having to live without Nefertiti's bust. And Gregor Schneider's "White Torture" leaves the NZZ cold in both senses.
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Saturday 14 April - Monday 16 April, 2007

Early plans of the failed attempt to overthrow Hitler have been uncovered in Moscow. Spiegel Online visits New York's Times Tower, a pixel design made real. Writer Guy Helminger tells of huge discrepancies between doctrine and the day-to-day in Iran. And the Berliner Zeitung reports from the wilds of East Berlin's Friedrichshain district.
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Friday 13 April, 2007

Ukrainian author Mykola Riabchuk sees events in his country as the upshot of an unfinished desovietization. Bernard-Henri Levy sees no reason to believe that being in government will take the terrorist edge off Hamas. Der Tagesspiegel accuses Andre Glucksmann of prettying up his past. And the Pope's new book signals a return to metaphysical seriousness.
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Thursday 12 April, 2007

This year's Documenta will be nothing short of a revolution, writes Die Zeit. Die Welt celebrates the comeback of the Arnie of the ivories, Tzimon Barto. The NZZ is much enamoured by the mouldy meals on the walls of the Palais de Tokyo. And the ghost of Mahler fills the air both inside and outside Berlin's Philharmonie.
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Wednesday 11 April, 2007

It's grim in Styria! Elfriede Jelinek has put the first 63 pages of her new novel, "Neid" online. A. L. Kennedy observes the UK and sees the Nazi era. The NZZ looks back at Emile Zola's "Fecundity" which pitted a Utopia of milky breasts against the sinking French birthrate. And Frieze editor Jörg Heiser differentiates between the J'accuse and the Jacuzzi mindset among art critics.
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Saturday 7 April - Tuesday 10 April, 2007

French philosopher Andre Glucksmann uses Proust to explain why he'll vote for Sarkozy. Ukrainian author Oksana Sabuschko calls the sorry demonstration of "Blues" in Kiev, a third-rate simulacrum. Iranian author Amir Hassan Cheheltan describes the junk, kitsch and frivolity of megacity Tehran. And two weeks into his honorary citizenship of Berlin, Wolf Biermann refuses to be silenced by the handsome perks.
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Thursday 5 April, 2007

Danish archaeologist Thomas L. Thompson says all we know about Jesus comes from stories originating well before his time. 99 years after the birth of conductor Herbert von Karajan, Joachim Kaiser remembers the music-is-like-an-X-ray dispute. And Die Welt joins a mass of elderly Walter Kempowski fans for a literary afternoon at the writer's home.
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Wednesday 4 April, 2007

Parisian theatre director Benjamin Korn sees the only solution to the French problem in the elimination of the office of the president. The SZ shows understanding for the Kaczynski brothers' acceleration of the lustration processes in Poland. And Alain Resnais' most recent film is a wonderful depiction of the sad side of beauty - what blooms must eventually wilt.
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Tuesday 3 April, 2007

Chinese artist Ai Weiwei tells why he's bringing peasants and potato farmers to this year's documenta contemporary art exhibition. Israeli historian Moshe Zimmermann is shocked at Israeli travel accounts of "accursed" Poland. The taz drools at the success of contemporary theatre in Israel. And we relive the historic fisticuffs between two literary giants.
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Saturday 31 March - Monday 2 April, 2007

Tunisian intellectual Abdelwahab Meddeb warns about taking multiculturalism too far and philosopher Slavoj Zizek decries the acceptance of torture in both theory and praxis. A year before the 100th anniversary of Herbert von Karajan's birthday, the FAZ is concerned the conductor will be given short shrift in history. While investigating Berlin's red light district for a tabloid paper, writer Thomas Brussig felt like Odysseus strapped to the mast.
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