They?re Still Painting, and More: The Leipzig Art Scene

First a success, then a bubble: the hype surrounding the ?New Leipzig School? put the city on the map of the art world, but also blinkered its vision.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Friday 31 August, 2007

Former German President Richard von Weizsäcker responds to a Polish slur that the German resistance was wimpy. Peter Handke puts the whole world straight on Milosovic and Nato's war against Serbia. Genome decoder Craig Venter and friends have no qualms about a eugenic revival. And Austrian writer Franzobel takes a close look at his Amazon book sales.
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Thursday 30 August, 2007

Andre Malraux's travel journals provide evidence that he had a way with words that wasn't exactly in line with Stalin's. Music critic Joachim Kaiser praises Simon Rattle's Wagner to the skies, but scoffs at his Stravinsky. Necla Kelek regrets that the public turns its supposedly concerned but ultimately blind eye to a Turkish honour killing.
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Wednesday 29 August, 2007

Archaeologist Ulrich Sinne looks back on temple fires in Greek Antiquity. The FAZ has heard some Himalayan peaks of piano music. Film maker Lav Diaz, who will show his latest 9 hour opus in Venice this year, explains himself. And we find out why Bollywood idol Aishwarya Rai had to marry a tree.
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Tuesday 28 August, 2007

More than an ex-Yugoslavian showcase, the Sarajevo Film Festival has gone international. Philosopher Robert Spaemann puts us - and the German government - straight on embryo rights. The taz reports back from the dormant censorship authorites in Sweden. And the next generation of German filmakers is united in loneliness.
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Saturday 25 August - Monday 27 August, 2007

Simon Rattle tells what wraiths, trolls and German efficiency have in common. The FAZ sings a hymn to Gerhard Richter's stained glass window in the Cologne Cathedral. Cees Nooteboom has stood before the gates of hell at the Joachim Patinir exhibition in the Prado. And if the bees disappear, they'll only take EU standards with them, not the entire human race.
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Friday 24 August, 2007

Salzburg director Jürgen Flimm regrets that by the time they've gathered some life experience, singers of today have stopped singing.  Turkish singer Zülfü Livaneli fears the spreading influence of Muhammad, rich and married as he was. And Alexei Balabanov's latest film "Cargo 200" shows the stinking, sadistic and sick side of the USSR. And the easiest way into Balkanpop is with DJ Shantel.
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Thursday 23 August, 2007

Liverpool and London try to outdo each other in their apologies for slavery. Poland does not want to be accused of looted art when it didn't do any looting. Die Zeit takes a close look at Michael Ignatieff's mea culpa on the Iraq war and where reason failed. And Biochemist Gottfried Schatz reassures us that weak as it may be, reason remains the most wonderful of the sun's children.
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Wednesday August 22, 2007

The former Portugese colony of Macau is becoming the Las Vegas of Asia while the Caucasus republic of Georgia continues to be defined in terms of curios and calamity. A new Berlin exhibition on art in New York is crippled by curatorial ambition. And Rheinland reggae star Gentleman worries about Germans' lacking spirituality.
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Tuesday 21 August, 2007

The taz is more optimistic about the social model represented by Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker's dancers, than the direction the post 9/11 debate has taken. The Welt laments the neglect of the German language, and the NZZ knows why the North Pole has become such a hot destination.
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Monday 20 and Saturday 18 August, 2007

The Kaczynski brothers have engendered a "culture of mistrust" in Poland by preaching national Darwinism. Islamic fundamentalists in Egypt are using ever more subtle and effective methods to permeate society. In the commemoration of the end of slavery two centuries ago, historical precision may be falling by the wayside. And 374 television screens make a building in Dutch Hilversum.
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Friday 17 August, 2007

Die Welt has seen the most harrowing theatre performance ever: Hotel Modern's puppet play about Auschwitz. The NZZ is bewildered that the prophet's message can only be heard outside Iran. And Ann Cotten, wunderkind of new German verse, sets us straight: literature is not for entertainment.
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Thursday 16 August, 2007

Germany's culture of debate is as unpredicatble as a kindergarten, writes author Thomas Brussig. The NZZ takes a critical look at Pakistan's strangled society 60 years after independence. Author Fritz J. Raddatz writes a self-critique of his failure as a GDR citizen.
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Wednesday 15 August, 2007

East German writers tell all: there's no literary merit in writing a novel about the GDR. Daniel Barenboim's West-Eastern Divan Orchestra gives a rare lesson in the art of listening. Swedish male crime writers sling mud at their young female colleagues - who sling it right back. And "Hallyu" is sweeping East Asia, causing young North Koreans to dye their hair yellow.
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Tuesday 14 August, 2007

Forty-six years after the Berlin Wall went up, East-German writer Ingo Schulze recalls his days as sentinel. The tampere theatre festival celebrates life in the vodka belt. Richard Serra's monumental sculptures give observers a strange feeling of lightness. And dancer Jerome Bel tells what dance and the army have in common.
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Saturday 11 August - Monday 13 August, 2007

Heiner Müller's bitter and bawdy "Quartett" is perfect for the Salzburg Festival, writes the NZZ. Author Ilija Trojanow gets his creative writing students off ego-lit and into the world of the foreign. And the Berliner Zeitung puts worries about cracks in Berlin's Holocaust Memorial down to a purity cult.
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Friday 10 August, 2007

The go-ahead on the controversial Elbe River bridge in Dresden has been thwarted in the 11th hour by a population of lesser horseshoe bats. Adam Krzeminski weighs up the pros and cons for letting the Kaczynskis stew in their own juices. And forced psychiatric institutionalisation has made a comeback in Putin's Russia.
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Thursday 9 August, 2007

To understand Putin we should read Puzo, writes Garry Kasparov. The Islamic world is in denial about Aids, says Islam expert Christian Meier. After sneaking a peek at the script of "Valkyrie", the SZ has recognised the true potential of this historical thriller. And Die Welt speculates whether the cracks in Berlin's 2-year-old Holocaust Memorial are intentional.
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Wednesday 8 August, 2007

The SZ visits actor Joachim Meyerhoff, the stormiest, most hyperactive upstart Hamlet theatre has ever seen. Peruvian tenor Juan Diego Florez tells how he winds himself up for Donizetti's notorious 9 high Cs. The taz grinds its axe against cinemascopic art invitation cards. And Georg Klein dissects the quandary of the flesh that speaks.
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Tuesday 7 August, 2007

Holocaust historian Raul Hilberg has died. His German editor remembers him as a pioneer. The SZ recollects his relentless precision and the FR recalls him as anything but cold. Social worker Asmaa Abdol-Hamid explains why Denmark is a Muslim country with an Islamic taxation system. And the taz has struggled through the overblown, stilted and outrageously boring new novel by this year's winner of the Georg Büchner Prize.
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Saturday 4 August - Monday 6 August, 2007

Stefan Wirner of Jungle World asks why German politicians are silent about recent mass executions in Iran. Hungarian composer György Kurtag remembers György Ligeti's "Poeme symphonique" for 100 metronomes. Die Welt decries the blind eyes in Bayreuth which failed to appreciate the 'Hasifal'. And we encounter the "crazed inventor" of the GDR, Karl Hans Janke, and the world of the "Stalag" penny dreadful in Israel.
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Friday 3 July, 2007

The NZZ analyses today's neo-bourgeois neo-journalism in Germany. The FR explains why the Sao Paolo plane crash has wounded Brazilian national pride. Amoz Oz sees an historic chance for peace in Israel and Palestine. And the Capitoline wolf it seems, is even younger than the Braunschweig lion.
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Thursday 2 August, 2007

A new generation of young stage directors is displacing the Steins, Zadeks and Castorfs of yesteryear, writes Die Welt. Die Zeit compares Bergman and Antonioni on truth and narrative. Wim Wenders has put his feelings for Antonioni into free verse. And the shrinking of the EU butter mountains provoke the SZ to mull on milk and its colouring of history.
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Wednesday 1 August, 2007

Italian director Michelangelo Antonioni, who has died, is to thank for "everything we consider modern," according to the FAZ. And was the master of moments in which nothing happens. The Caricatura in Kassel surveys the state of the art in German cartoons and wounded egos. And Luk Perceval's staging of "Moliere. Eine Passion" at the Salzburg Festival is a little too clever for its own good.
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