?From the great beyond into the present? ? an interview with Jo Lendle

Hanser publisher Jo Lendle talks about gentle adjustments of languages and marketing strategies.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Friday 29 June, 2005.

Rappers from Palestine, Hick Hop from the USA and a vinyl freak in Berlin. More on Mongolia from the maker of "The Weeping Camel". And Anselm Kiefer on why he is, for the time being at least, a painter.
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Thursday July 28, 2005.

Georg Seeßlen looks at the attack of the killer discs and Henning Klüver looks at dodgy dealings behind museum acquisitions. Katarzyna Stoklosa reports on the 'Parade of Normality' and anti Euro-gay sentiment in Poland. On the festival front, Claus Spahn is left cold by Eiji Oue's conducting of "Tristan" and Hans-Klaus Jungheinrich waxes lyrical about a gorgeous voice in body suit.
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Wednesday July 27, 2005.

The critics in Salzburg and Bayreuth are feeling their oats - Gerhard Stadelmaier enthuses over the "writhing of worms" in the "Tales of the Vienna Woods" and Reinhard J. Brembeck regrets that "Tristan and Isolde" is full of "premature climaxes". A meeting of Islamic clerics in London is less theatrical, more deluded.
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Tuesday 26 July, 2005.

Egyptian author Alaa al-Aswani warns about a new wave of terror – at the hands of the Egyptian government. Eckhard Fuhr reassures us that German coalition governments are not as bad as they're made out to be. In Le Figaro (the summer doldrums in the German press are making themselves felt) Gilles Kepel discusses bearded cyber-Salafism and the galaxy of Jihad. And finally, the discovery of an Ice Age phallus and Poland's box office hit "Karol".
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Saturday 23 July and Monday 25 July, 2005

Terrorism and Wagner. Andreas Breitenstein accuses the European Left of subscribing to cultural relativism when it comes to the war on terror, Ian Buruma explains why the US has made a better job of integration than Europe and Abdelkader Benali discusses the problems posed for immigrants in an open society. As Bayreuth opens tonight with "Tristan and Isolde", Angela Merkel muses on the opera's bitter end, and its stage designer Anna Viebrock talks Bunuel, amor fou and irony.
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Friday 22 July, 2005

Regina Mönch looks at the Armenian genocide in German schoolbooks, Michael Walzer sees no link between US foreign policy and terrorism, Johannes Willms doesn't understand why the French are in a flap about a Pepsi takeover of Danone, Micha Brumlik looks at the overture to the opera of German terrorism and Philipp Blom celebrates Samuel Johnson's dandiprat and jobbernowl.
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Thursday 21 July, 2005

Julia Gerlach introduces the new stars of Islamic cool and Christian Schüle explains the success of the New Leipzig School as symptomatic of a tired society. Hans Magnus Enzensberger examines the increasing lack of shine to US military victories and Niklas Maak revels in Munich's new giant geranium tub. Sabine Leucht visits the long-haired population of Oberammergau and Alexander Gauland looks at his favourite topic: German conservatism.
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Wednesday 20 July, 2005.

CDU politician Monika Grütters resassures us that culture will surivive under her party - should it form the next government. An exhibition in Essen of Diane Arbus photographs displays people for what they are: posers. Gerhard Gnauck portrays the Ukrainian city of L'viv, giving new meaning to the term "multi-cultural". And Bahman Nirumand wonders why the hospital where a dissident journalist is being treated in Iran needs to be declared a military zone.
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Tuesday 19 July, 2005

Ludwig Amman harps on Ayaan Hirsi Ali for being anti-Islamic, Nawal el-Saadawi explains why she stopped trying to become Egypt's first woman president and Christopher Schmidt compares Friedrich Schiller to the 68er generation. Patrick Bahners takes a dim view of Germans' confidence in their government, Dirk Baecker compares that government to Ancient Greece and Bodo Mrozek writes an obit for Super 8 film.
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Saturday 16 July - Monday 18 July, 2005

Most of Monday's papers conclude that Harry Potter 6 is the half-blooded prologue to 7. And the FR reports that German best-seller culture is sucking the blood out of the literary market. On Saturday, Götz Aly celebrates the end of the 68er fairytale. Painter Markus Lüpertz looks at the SPD art legacy and Klaus Hillenbrand looks back on the history of the Taurus Express.
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Friday 15 July, 2005

Urs Schoettli calls for more European "Sturm und Drang", while Ralf Dahrendorf sees openness and expansion as Europe's true calling. Felicitas Hoppe is sceptical of the conservative fad in Germany and Christoph Huber defends an un-Austrian Austrian film.
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Thursday 14 July, 2005

Ian Buruma sees dissatisfaction and modern communication behind Islamic terror and Ulrich Beck sees Kafka in the Brasiliansiation of the labour market. Benedikt Erenz looks at the first 400 years of printed news, Malte Conradi sees more than voyeurism in Diane Arbus' photography and Niklas Maak tells of the horrors and hopes in Goya's painting.
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Wednesday 13 July 2005

Blown away by Francisco de Goya, seduced by Julia Fischer or pleasantly titillated by Paul McCarthy - the critics are well-disposed today. And on the political front, we read that terrorism should not be called war, the Brits are seriously conflicted over the London attacks and al-Quaeda doesn't exist.
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Tuesday 12 July, 2005

Tahir Abbas sees Britain as the place for revamping Islam, authors from the former Yugoslavia talk in Munich about the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, Jens Bisky is aghast at the lack of conservative values in the conservative CDU's election platform, Jaffe Vink and Natalie Tenberg write on Dutch society now Theo van Gogh's alleged murderer has gone on trial, and Manuela Mena talks about her Goya show in Berlin.
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Saturday 9 July - Monday 11 July, 2005

Marcel Marceau recalls miming to save his life in Vichy France and Lazlo Földenyi recalls trying to talk the long dead Heinrich von Kleist out of taking his own life. Further reflections on the aftermath of the London bombings. And the supposedly new and improved German Film Prize ceremony was a bad joke.
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Friday 8 July, 2005

All today's papers are full of reports on the London bombings. We'll post a more comprehensive review of those comments shortly. Other stories in today's feuilletons cover German watchblogs, the German Film Prize which will be awarded tonight, and Live 8 in Edinburgh.
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Thursday 7 July, 2005

In which German film directors discuss wrapping content in chocolate and we hear that the state of contemporary German literature is Raymond Carver's fault. We also hear the second note of the world's slowest piece of music and why rich-kid London getting the Olympics is just plain unfair!
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Wednesday 6 July, 2005

Orhan Pamuk sees EU entry as a means of safeguarding democracy in Turkey. Mark Siemons visited yesterday's protest against the removal of Berlin's unofficial Wall memorial, and Gerd Koenen points to a German secret service agent behind the bomb in Berlin's Jewish Community Centre. Martin Mosebach speculates why "The Da Vinci Code" has sold 50 million copies and Alexander Hosch looks at downscaling among star architects.
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Tuesday 5 July, 2005

Arno Widmann mourns the loss of the thousand crosses at Checkpoint Charlie. Tim B. Müller, declares the European Left bankrupt. Ulrich Herbert discusses Oskar Lafontaine's use of the controversial term "Fremdarbeiter". Dorothee Wenner writes on the booming Nigerian video CD industry and Willi Jasper on the quarrel over sex and literature between Thomas Mann and his brother Heinrich.
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Saturday 2 July - Monday 4 July, 2005

Kerstin Holm is irate at 50 Russian celebs backing the 9 year jail-sentence handed down to Mikhail Khodorkovsky, Slavoj Zizek hears dissonance, exaggeration and chimeras in Europe's anthem, Beethoven's Ode to Joy. Sebastian Handke found the Live8 concert in London soulless. And all Gustav Seibt has to say about CDU conservative chancellor candidate Angela Merkel is that she's got nothing to say at all.
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Friday 1 July, 2005

Monika Maron warns about the new right-wing leftist alliance with its back to the future. Richard Wagner says the EU crisis will make Europe real for Central and Eastern Europe. Kathrin Kruse tells of the importance of a Western face on Chinese produce in Italian fashion and Björk enthuses about turning into a whale.
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