Saturday 24 - Friday 30 November, 2007

We Romanians are to blame for the problem of the Roma, says novelist Mircea Cartarescu. Social integration rides on public transport, research into banlieue unrest has shown. The fun will go out of Polish politics without the malicious, petty Kaczynski twins, writes Andrzej Stasiuk. And pop is helping East Asians to embrace their shared cultural roots.
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Saturday 17- Friday 23 November, 2007

Bernard-Henri Levy calls for European Union protection for Ayaan Hirsi Ali. We need another Susan Sontag, sighs Der Freitag. Russia's new literary hope is flourishing in the hostile environment of the Urals. Accordeonist Sebastian Claren transforms Eisenstein's "Potemkin" into musical close-ups and tracking shots. And die Welt remembers Sarkozy on the night of his election victory, gloomy as Napoleon after a pointless battle.
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November 10 - 16, 2007

Italian writer Ugo Riccarelli defends Rome's Roma, who are living within reach of the light. Constitutional Court judge Udo di Fabio warns the West against destroying itself in the war on terror. 100 years after his birth, Claus von Stauffenberg is enjoying unprecendented popularity. Germany's striking train drivers have outstripped its managers in advancing the common good. And the Maastricht border zone is the Bermuda Triangle of stolen art.
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Saturday 3 - Friday 9 November, 2007

Poet Durs Grünbein thanks the Poles for Solidarnosc. Polish author Wojciech Kuczok worries that his country is splitting in two. Author Jonathan Littell bemoans the trade-off of ideologies for iPods. Author Ingo Schulze looks a gift horse in the mouth. The Take That concert in Berlin was an unworldly triumph of pop-historical dimensions in mauve. And Paris' social science institutes will have to slum it in the banlieues.
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October 27 - November 2, 2007

A 'Tsunami of youth' is overwhelming the theatre landscape in Poland and politically, a fresh wind is blowing. Italy's Catholics are in uproar about a scandal that has broken about their beloved Padre Pio. Büchner-Prize winner Martin Mosebach compares Saint-Just with Himmler in his acceptance speech. Filmmaker Enrique Sanchez Lansch picks apart a long-standing taboo: the Nazi past of the Berlin Philharmoniker. And Andre Glucksmann begs us to remember Mikhail Khodorkovsky, Russia's new Andrei Sakharov.
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