?From the great beyond into the present? ? an interview with Jo Lendle

Hanser publisher Jo Lendle talks about gentle adjustments of languages and marketing strategies.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Wednesday 28 Febraury, 2007

Anne Applebaum defends Ayaan Hirsi Ali and covers signandsight.com's multiculturalism debate for the Washington Post. The NZZ looks at the human note in Andreas Gursky's Janus-faced photographs. A museum for Sun Yat-sen in Hong Kong sends a political message to China's ruling elite. And Eric Schlosser compares diets past and present.
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Tuesday 27 February, 2007

The best foreign language film Oscar for "The Lives of Others" has ruffled some feathers in Germany. Director von Donnersmarck is accused of moral equivocality and historical fabulation. But maybe critics just have problems with success and self-confidence. Spain is digging up its Civil War history and fighting it out on the obituary pages. And Berlin architect Jürgen Mayer H. has built a brutalist monster of a student cafeteria in Karlsruhe, but at least it's well insulated.
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Saturday 24 February - Monday 26 February, 2007

The FAZ prints the last article by art collector Heinz Berggruen, who has died at 93. Spiegel Online was there when Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck won the Oscar for Best Foreign Picture. A show of works by Renaissance sculptor Conrat Meit shows an alabaster Judith wielding a hacked-off head. And an exhibition in Frankfurt goes to the roots of Op Art.
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Friday 23 February, 2007

Bishop Mixa's gotten hot around the collar about Family Minister Ursula von der Leyen's policies in favour of working mothers. Director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck lauds the glue in his original editions of Rilke. South Korean writer Kim Young-ha is concerned that Seoul might be forgetting itself. Yemen is short on water and long on qat. And German author Ingo Schulze understands the true wonder that is an orange peel.
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Thursday 22 February, 2007

The FR analyses the effortless androgynous eroticism of Bill Kaulitz, singer of German boy group Tokio Hotel. The SZ looks at talk that Barack Obama isn't black enough to become US president. Artist Richard Pettibone tells how he gave one of his soup can paintings to Andy Warhol. And Berlin's Büro Graft will build a glistening art hall on the city's iconographic Schlossplatz.
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Wednesday 21 February, 2007

Kisho Kurokawa's new National Art Centre Tokyo is a huge lamp in the Roppongi night. A new exhibition on Tibet in Berlin nurses the stereotype of the red-robed, meditating and ahistorical lama. The Frankfurter Rundschau decides that Germany's conservatives have a feeling for family but no concept for it. And Jan Philipp Reemtsma draws a comparision between Dostoevsky's demons and the RAF.
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Tuesday, 20 February, 2007

Turkish author Elif Shafak says xenophobic Turkey and Turkophobic Europe would form a good hybrid culture. An Op Art show has the Frankfurter Rundshau twitching and throbbing. Photographer Wolfgang Tillmans says it's as easy for an artist to change course as for a supertanker. And Nikolaus Harnoncourt wows Zurich with some far from run-of-the-mill Mozart.
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Monday 19 and Saturday 17 February, 2007

The Berlinale leaves critics feeling over-stuffed with history and political correctness. Nina Hoss as Best Actress, however, brims with international potential. The Süddeutsche Zeitung asks if it's fair for Western intellectuals to support the Irak war on the basis of their own history. And Andrzej Stasiuk can simply not imagine a German weeping.
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Friday 16 February, 2007

"There are no European values, only Western ones," declares historian Heinrich August Winkler. The FAZ pans Marianne Faithfull's film role as "wanking widow" Irina Palm. The SZ swoons at Andreas Gursky's depth of field mastery. The taz reads the ecriture automatique of William Kentridge's ant films with fascination. And a Munich zoologist reminds us that hippos once wallowed in the Rhine.
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Thursday 15 February, 2007

Die Zeit picks up on signandsight.com's multiculturalism debate, kicked off by Pascal Bruckner. Historian Ariel Toaff has blood boiling in Italy, with his very un-PC book on vengeful Jews. Tonight is the Vienna Opera Ball, and organiser Ioan Holender hopes to trump Paris Hilton by inviting a horse. Translator Barbara Kleiner gives us the sorry stats on what she gets for creating cultural value. And the taz talks corporate freaksploitation and Web 2.0.
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Wednesday 14 February, 2007

Writer Viktor Erofeyev worries that dreams of Holy Russia are going to the heads of Russians in power. Filmmaker Christian Petzold puts the Italian rehearsal into action. The taz talks to Charles Burnett about independent black cinema. Ronald Brautigam's recordings of Beethoven's piano sonatas have the SZ in ecstasy. And Marta Meszaros is awarded a "Berlinale Camera" for her cinematic diaries.
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Tuesday 13 February, 2007

Russia's Ivan Consumovitch couldn't be happier with life under Putin. Writer Maria Golia portrays the bureaucratic hell of megacity Cairo. Guy Maddin's new film "Brand Upon the Brain!" is for the FR the zaniest and most original film of the Berlinale. And the FAZ points out that the Red Army Faction never took personal responsibility for their murders.
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Saturday 10 February - Monday 12 February, 2007

"Save Michael Trepashkin!" writes Russian director Andrei Nekrasov in an open letter to Vladimir Putin. The FAZ gives its backing to the suggestion by historian Gerd Koenen to award the Peace Prize of the German Book Trade to murdered Russian journalist Anna Politkovskaya. An editor of the Fischer Verlag outlines a paradigm shift on the German market for English-language literature. And in the Stasi play "Mala Zementenbaum," actor Thomas Lawinky would have done better to play himself.
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Friday 9 February, 2007

Writer Georg Klein embraces the thought of the Germans as a nation of small-car drivers. It might make them more erotic! Märklin's have reintroduced tanks into their toy line. The FAZ has a dig at the new Russian reality soap "Stalin live". And the Berliner Zeitung witnesses the real Rocky plumping the cushions in New Jersey.
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Thursday 8 February, 2007

The Berlinale opens today. For Die Zeit, the American films are as traumatised by Iraq today as they were by Vietnam in the Seventies. And the Chinese censors have already started wielding their scissors. The Berliner Zeitung looks at the side effects of over-saturation in the French cinema landscape. Andrzej Stasiuk says the degrading of General Jaruzelski is absurd. And Peter Sloterdijk pleads for a peaceful utilisation of monotheistic energy.
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Wednesday 7 February, 2007

The Germans' negative attitude towards integration is stopping Turks from applying for citizenship, says ethnologist Werner Schiffauer. Michnikowszczyzna is to blame for the decline in values, according to Poland's Right. Armin Petras, head of Berlin's Gorki Theater, discusses the Stasi themes in his new play "Mala Zementbaum." And the FAZ reports breathless from a zombie seance at the Club Transmediale.
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Tuesday 6 February, 2007

Writer Antonio Orejudo vents his anger at bored middle-class kids and Spain's rabid urbanisation. The FAZ quakes beneath Anselm Kiefer's unwieldy concrete towers in London. A new exhibition features works by Sigmar Polke, the satirist commanded by higher powers. And Russian artist Dmitri Prigov portrays the three utopias of megacity Moscow.
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Monday 5 February, 2007

Historian Jörg Friedrich brushes off the angry crowd in London at the presentation of his new book "The Fire" on the bombing of Dresden. The FAZ revels in the subversive games of Bristol graffiti artist Banksy. William Forsythe has premiered a virtuoso choreographic etude in Dresden. And a show of erotic drawings by Pierre Klossowski pitches together schoolboys, demons and matrons.
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Friday 2 February, 2007

Zafer Senocak is disheartened to see the spirit of North Korea passing over Turkey. Ayaan Hirsi Ali insists that a reformed European Islam will only be possible when Muslims accept that the Koran is not the word of God. Siemens Music Prize winner Brian Ferneyhough shows traces of anarchism. And that cat's out of the bag: an independent Scotland would be one of the richest countries in Europe.
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Thursday 1 February, 2007

Orhan Pamuk has cancelled a trip to Germany for security reasons. The feuilletons discuss how Pamuk has become an object of hatred among some Turks, and how the murder of Hrant Dink has prompted others to frankly reappraise racism in their country. The NZZ portrays "brains not blood" conductor Michael Gielen. And 60s sex symbol Uschi Obermaier talks about her "wild life" with the actress that plays her.
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