On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Friday 31 March, 2006

Today's articles include a defence of opera in the mother tongue and a call to stop mythologising Dresden. There is a hymn of praise to The Economist and a new look at the motives behind films about East Germany. The nation state is fast becoming a thing of the past and Berlin's cultural senator is a parody of a GDR intellectual.
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Thursday 30 March, 2006

Friedrich Christian Delius bemoans Europe's tolerance for puppeteer-posing-as-Punch Silvio Berlusconi. Die Zeit reports from a lively Toumani Diabate concert in Mali. A museum in an ex-GDR prison is told to collaborate with former Stasi members on its wording. Fake books by famous writers are the big thing in China this season. And the "Volksbühne asthetic" makes waves in Paris' Opera Garnier.
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Wednesday 29 March, 2006

Author Richard Wagner answers Yuri Andrukhovych's provocative speech at the Leipzig Book Fair. The NZZ criticises the Israeli-Palestinian dialogue industry. The taz portrays the circuit-bending aleatoric music pioneer Qubais Reed Ghazala. In an interview shortly before his death, Stanislaw Lem calls intelligence unhealthy. And Jean Rouaud and Alain Touraine comment on the new unrest in Paris.
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Tuesday 28 March, 2006

Die Welt bids farewell to Stanislaw Lem. The Süddeutsche raves about a shimmering show of Chinese video and photography and witnesses a twofold failing of Chekhov theatre in Berlin. And Max Beckmann retrospectives abound, Crumb-like apocalyptic whores and all.
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Saturday 25 March - Monday 27 March, 2006

After making a splash when he ripped the pad from a critic's hands, actor Thomas Lawinky now outs as an erstwhile Stasi informer. Author/doctor Jens Petersen describes the cliches ailing Germany's physicians. Vaclav Havel sympathises with Ukraine and admits he sometimes longed to be back in jail. Cecile Wajsbrot says France suffers from Dorian Gray syndrome. And Saturday's feuilletons are full of the 4th Berlin Biennale.
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Friday 24 March, 2006

Sex and gluttony win at the Hungarian Film Week with György Palfi's "Taxidermia". Richard Swartz explains why so many Serbs think Milosevic was poisoned. Jörg Immendorff explains how he paints without the use of his hands. The FR visits Arthur Rubenstein's favourite hotel in Poland, and the German Google Earth Community is catching up on lost ground.
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Thursday 23 March, 2006

French sociologist Alain Touraine draws an important distinction between the student and suburban protests in France and Jordan Mejias warns not to get too excited about Francis Fukuyama's apparent departure from the neocon camp. The Goethe Institute appears to be on its last legs, financially, and Spike Lee can't wait to shoot an epic in Berlin.
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Wednesday 22 March, 2006

Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck's debut film about a Stasi spy's change of heart gets raves all around. A Belarus student describes the emotional atmosphere on October Square in Minsk. And Ilija Trojanow is exasperated by black and white thinking in view of the wealth of Sufi spirituality.
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Tuesday 21 March, 2006

A film on the East German secret police garners high praise, as does the Japanese band Moi dix mois. A close look at the female orgasm and a puzzled take on the British willingness to take pharmaceutical risk. And the FAZ suggests that Chirac might want to step down.
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Saturday 18 March - Monday 20 March, 2006

The star of the Leipzig Book Fair was the "gentle, Saxon giant" Clemens Meyer. Meanwhile, Slovakian author Michal Hvorecky wonders why eastern European authors are always expected to meditate on Europe. And Arno Widmann explains why no dog faced with the immigrant test would want to immigrate to Germany.
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Friday 17 March, 2006

Crowned at the Berlinale film festival, the Bosnian director Jasmila Zbanic is being hounded at home. The Tate Triennial warrants little more than a yawn. Luc Tuymans was shocked by the banality of Santiago Sierra's gas chamber synagogue. And Julia Tymoshenko stars in her first all-action political thriller.
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Thursday 16 March, 2006

Ukrainian writer Yuri Andrukhovych uses his speech of thanks at the Leipzig Book Fair to make a dramatic appeal to European understanding. Author Victor Yerofeyev outlines the mass dehumanisation of the Russian army. Spike Lee yearns for a black middle-class film. Sonja Margolina observes the re-sealing of Russia's political archives. And for Croatian author Slavenka Drakulic, Milosevic died pining for his Lady Macbeth.
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Wednesday 15 March, 2006

Feridun Zaimoglu is on the receiving end of much back-patting, for his services to Muslim women. Die Welt recommends that Mel Brook's "The Producers" be shown throughout the Arab world. The FAZ editor's new book makes the situation of the German women after WWII look like a picnic compared with what they have to do today. And Tangier is the new Marrakesh.
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Tuesday 14 March, 2006

Poles could learn a lesson from how Germany deals with its past, writes the SZ. The competition entries to redesign Berlin's Topography of Terror museum all shy away from making any architectural statement. The Germans fought the first clash of cultures against Napoleon, it turns out. And an exhibition of works by Louise Bourgeois is a fitting tribute to the artist and the psychoanalytic century in which she lived.
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Saturday 11 March - Monday 13 March, 2006

Authors Beqe Cufaj, Bora Cosic and Richard Swartz comment on the death of Slobodan Milosevic. Michael Thalheimer shows he's the Quentin Tarantino of the German stage. Jürgen Habermas shows Europe the way forward. Slavoj Zizek is happy "Brokeback Mountain" didn't win best film. And for the FAZ, Vanessa Beecroft is just selling Louis Vuitton bags.
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Friday 10 March, 2006

Jürgen Habermas explains why intellectuals are suffocating in today's global village. The SZ looks at the online community, whose life is an open book. Der Tagesspiegel keeps us abreast of German "Schmuddeltheater", and the NZZ goes to the Whitney Biennale, where the collective triumphs.
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Thursday 9 March, 2006

The euphoric praise of Ang Lee's "Brokeback Mountain" continues while a movie about Turkish immigrants in Germany fails to find a German distributor. The President of the Bibliotheque nationale in Paris wants to build a united front against Google Book Search and theatre bashing is becoming an official sport in Germany.
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Wednesday 8 March, 2006

Elke Buhr sees herself as social glue in the context of Frank Schirrmacher's book "Minimum" and wonders where she should stick herself. Hans Christoph Buch describes life in cleptocratic Zaire. The taz looks at Germany's heart of darkness in the Friedrich Christian Flick Collection. The SZ celebrates the revival of Germany's first generation of pop authors and dedicates a page to strange musical instruments. And Detlef Buck sings praises of Berlin Neukölln.
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Tuesday 7 March, 2006

While German critics are divided on the Oscar decisions, "L.A. Crash" garners only laurels and the FAZ cannot sing high enough praise of Heath Ledger. The Ars 06 art show in Helsinki shows various forms of paradise in hell. And the Süddeutsche Zeitung gives some thought to the possible repercussions of a guilty finding in the case against best-selling author Dan Brown.
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Saturday 4 March - Monday 6 March, 2006

Poet Robert Gernhardt blames Western papers for keeping readers in the dark in their coverage of the cartoon conflict. Ahmed Khaled recounts problems he had shooting his film about sex on Egyptian buses. The next generation of Belarusian poets is alive and well and bashing Belarus. Ang Lee compares reactions in Taiwan and the USA to homosexuality in film. And a TV movie on the Dresden bombing is called a "cowardly compromise."
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Friday 3 March, 2006

Swiss author Daniel de Roulet tells how he burned a media magnate's ski chalet in the days of "Sunday terrorism". The NZZ explains that Berlusconi was a logical development. Paula Fox tells chilling tales from her stint as news stringer in post-war Europe. Alain Platel's ballet "Vespero" relates ecstasy before dawn. And after the death of the record industry the blogosphere now threatens music journalism.
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Thursday 2 March, 2006

Serbian author Bora Cosic says the war criminal in hiding, Radko Mladic, will have turned into a Karamazov brother. The newly polished Brussels Atomium is a glittering fossil of modernity. In the eyes of an investment consultant, the German football team should be happy that places like Togo and Saudi Arabia exist. And director Hans-Christian Schmid talks about his film "Requiem", which deals with a real life exorcism in Seventies Germany.
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Wednesday 1 March, 2006

The FAZ upbraids German publishers for ignoring poets under 40. Wolfgang Sofsky fantasises about a flu pandemic with hundreds of millions dead. After 100 days of coalition government, steadfast joylessness is the key to Angela Merkel's success. The Ballet de Monte Carlo acts up a storm with "A Midsummer Night's Dream". And Iran balances between Persian greatness and Islamic faith.
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