Squandering our emancipation

Thursday 27 April, 2006

When did I start thinking about feminism again? Last year, the year of my sixth male boss in a row. For us young women, equality of the sexes went without saying. Then we flirted with old-fashioned roles, and now we're suddenly back in a man's world. Along with henna hair, drooping breasts and dungarees, have we abolished equality? By Heike Faller
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The salt of stupidity

Wednesday 26 April, 2006

Wolfram Siebeck sets out on the second leg of his Icelandic saga. This time, he samples local specialities like the pönnusteiktar gellur med ljüfri grádostasósu and finally gets the chance to dig his fork into some head aspic.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 25 April, 2006

In The Spectator, Boris Johnson visits China and is fazed by charming Chinese and a squid. The Canadian Walrus Magazine gleefully witnesses charred bags of soy milk in a firebombed greengrocer's. Outlook India celebrates the capital of classification. The New Yorker cuts up a whole pig. Przekroj presents a new Polish newspaper purporting absolute objectivity. In Gazeta Wyborcza, historian Anna Wolff-Poweska laments Poland's image as a farrago of frustration. Die Weltwoche describes the political climate in Iran. A train journey reveals to Il Foglio the similarities between Prodians and Berlusconians.
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My Germany

Monday 24 April, 2006

I want to see Turks en masse waving the German flag. Jobs, rules, the German language and free religion – these must be the pillars of a new German society. Today's West Germans, East Germans and foreign Germans are perhaps only the forefathers of the curious folk we will be in thirty years. And then, what belongs together will grow together. An appeal by Feridun Zaimoglu.
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World Cup countdown

Thursday 20 April, 2006

The FIFA World Cup is approaching lickety split and Germany, being Germany, is all set. Only two things remain to be done. Germans have to learn how to smile and their team has to learn how to kick left. By Moritz Rinke
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Sushi on ice

Wednesday 19 April, 2006

Germany's great gourmand Wolfram Siebeck goes North, travelling to Iceland at the coldest time of the year for a culinary adventure blending dream and reality.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 18 April, 2006

The New Republic imagines atomic weapons in the hands of former child soldiers in Iran. Espresso can't get too euphoric about the election results in Italy. Nepszabadsag thinks that conservative politician Viktor Orban has gone so far right, he's back on the left. The TLS is searching for British intellectuals. In Le Monde diplomatique, sociologist Lahouri Addi takes a bitter look at Algeria's attempt to confront its history. In Le Point, Bernard-Henri Levy tries to make sense of the silence over the crimes of white against black Muslims in Darfur. The New York Times counsels everyone to put their tissue on file before somebody else does.
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Melancholy and abstraction

Wednesday 12 April, 2006

Now showing in Berlin, "Melancholy: Genius and Madness in Art" is the foremost exhibition of its kind. But what makes a work melancholic? Melancholy is difficult to catch red-handed, and scarcely easier to repress. Eliminate it here, and it crops up over there, tough as any weed. Everything testifies to the presence of melancholy. Yet the more you look, the more it eludes your gaze. By Laszlo F. Földenyi
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Books this Season: Fiction

Spring 2006

The German feuilletons have discovered the other - and with force. The most talked-about literary works deal with 19th century travellers, Turkish girls in Anatolia, youth gangs in Leipzig or coma-stricken narrators. In our nonfiction section, Necla Kelek's study of Turkish men in Germany launched a thousand arguments.
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Books this Season: Nonfiction

Spring 2006

After her book about imported brides, Necla Kelek turns her attention to Turkish men. Frank Schirrmacher warns of the ills of childless society, and Lars Brand remembers his father, Chancellor Willy. Plus enticing monographs on Berlusconi, Benjamin Franklin, Sigmund Freud, Jean Sibelius, Michelangelo, Botticelli and Bernini.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday, 11 April 2006

In the New Yorker, Seymour Hersh describes the American plans for a regime change in Iran. Orhan Pamuk tells the story behind Gentile Bellini's portrait of the Sultan Mehmed II in The Guardian. In Clarin, Gianni Vattimo demands respect for the principle of "love thy neighbour" in democratic systems. Le Point sees only losers in the protests against the labour market reforms. Polityka explains the difficulty of building a museum in Warsaw without a building, a collection or employees. The TLS tells of the most bleak and bloated parts of the former Soviet Union.
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Happier without father

Monday 10 April, 2006

Turkish-born German sociologist Necla Kelek has been accused of painting the Turkish community in Germany in a bad light. In an interview with Michaela Schlagenwerth, she explains that what she sees is what she writes. More dangerous than her portrayal, she says, is the pervasive blindness to the facts. (Photo Lebeck)
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The collector of worlds

Thursday 6 April, 2006

Like hero, like author. Ilija Trojanow, world traveller, author of travel books and Mecca pilgrim, has written an astounding biographical novel about Richard Francis Burton, Mecca pilgrim, author of travel books and world traveller. By Karl-Markus Gauß
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Between Guatemala and Mongolia

Wednesday 5 April, 2006

Italians go to the polls on Sunday. Do Europeans realise what is at stake, or does Italophilia blind them to Berlusconi's brutal power games? Outside Italy, people fail to see that this "puppet" would already be behind bars in most European countries, and that its legal system and press freedom are on a par with Guatemala and Mongolia. But who could come next? Friedrich Christian Delius paints a dire portrait of Italy's ailing democracy.
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The Asterix complex

Tuesday 4 April, 2006

French philosopher and novelist Pascal Bruckner has no qualms about bucking public opinion. In an interview with Marko Martin he discusses Gallic fury, suburban rioters' scorched earth methods, the systemic weaknesses of French society and the Finkielkraut Affair.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 4 April, 2006

In Merkur, Tony Corn discusses World War Four. Outlook India investigates India's secularism crisis. In Folio, Paul Parin stresses the beneficial effect of speed, morphium, alcohol and cigarettes for the elderly. Malek Chebel and Jean-Paul Charney quarrel in L'Express about the reformability of Islam. Ian McEwan praises the poets of science in The Guardian. In Polityka, Adam Krzeminski calls Europe the continent of neurasthenics. Peter Nadas reflects on ambiguous sentences in Elet es Irodalom. And The Economist commiserates with France.
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In the slush puddle of existence

Monday 3 March, 2006

Far from the over-exitement of today's artworld, the 4th berlin biennale for contemporary art wallows in the dark depths of things jettisoned and biographical, offering the art pilgrim twelve stations along Berlin's Augustraße. By Hanno Rauterberg
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