The Local View ? Neighbourhood Cinemas and Alternative Film Projects

Many small neighbourhood cinemas invested in the future. The digital options for showing films are opening up new vistas for alternative projects. Not all of them are legal.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 29 July, 2008

The London Review of Books finds one point on which to agree with General Franco. Rue89 asks: How anti-Semitic is the cartoonist Sine? The Wall Street Journal reports on a Dutch cartoonist who landed in jail for making anti-Muslim jokes. In the New York Times Thomas Schweich looks at myopia, corruption and poppies in Afghanistan. Al-Ahram watched the Egyptian remake of 'Cabaret'. In Espresso, Umberto Eco uses taxi drivers to justify the rise in global security. And political scientist Seyla Benhabib tells ResetDoc why we need blogs.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 22 July, 2008

In the Hungarian Quarterly, Magda Szabo remembers how her first manuscript was smuggled out of Hungary and into the hands of a German publisher's reader by the name of Hermann Hesse. Portfolio portrays the new publisher of the Washington Post, Katherine Weymouth. The Financial Times portrays the editor of the New Yorker, David Remmick. In Espresso, Robert Saviano meet actors who would never join the Mafia. The Economist is amazed to see that the music industry is starting to wise up at last. And in the New Yorker, Chinese students ask why they need democracy.
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In the burning house

Monday 21 July, 2008

The dead body of Russian artist Anna Alchuk was pulled out of the river Spree in April this year. She and her husband, philosopher Michail Ryklin, had moved to Berlin in November 2007 after life in Russia became intolerable as a direct consequence of Alchuk's participation in the exhibition "Caution: Religion!". Michail Ryklin looks to his wife's tormented diary entries to help him approximate the causes of her death.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 15 July 2008

The Observator Cultural introduces Romania's key authors in an ambitious translation project. First stop: Stefan Banulescu. The Spectator nominates the internet as the world's most conservative power. The Hungarian magazines focus intently on the violence against Hungary's homosexuals. In the New Statesman, Muslim rapper Deeyah explains why modesty doesn't help. And Umberto Eco declares that there's no relativism in the world of fiction.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 8 July, 2008

"Hands off Lech Walesa!" demands Adam Michnik in the Gazeta Wyborcza. Polityka also defends the Solidarnosc leader against the hatred of the Kaczynski brothers. La vie des idees introduces a resistance programme against the dominance of English. In The Nation, Naomi Klein explains the neat rationale for pillaging Iraqi oil. Suketu Mehta encourages slum tourism in Espressso. Martina Navratilova lobs and smashes her way into the art world in the Spectator. And Elet es Irodalom can't get over the Dutch in Hungary.
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The German veto on Ukraine

Monday 7 July, 2008

Author Martin Pollack issues a rebuttal of Richard Wagner's arguments against Ukraine's EU bid, accusing him of Western bias and ignorance. If we follow his line of thought, even Italy has no place in the European Union.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 1 July, 2008

In American Scholar, Yale professor William Deresiewicz sees the downside of his elite education while standing opposite his plumber. Wired welcomes in the Petabyte Age. Tygodnik Powszechny visits the "Sacroexpo" to look at camouflaged chalices. In the New York Review of Books, Zadie Smith analyses the supra-Kafka. In L'Espresso, Umberto Eco explains the vocative to Italian ministerial officials. Merkur recommends that art critics take a leaf out of Theocritus' Fifteenth Idyll. And the New York Times goes out in search of children in Europe.
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Blueprint for power

Tuesday 1 July, 2008

Since the beginning of the year, the German feuilletons have been probing the relationship between architecture and morality. Their interest was kindled by the publication of Deyan Sudjic's book "The Edifice Complex: How the Rich and Powerful Shape the World", which came out in 2006, and examines the role of European architects in non-democratic states such as China and Libya. We take a look at how the debate developed.
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