On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Self-censorship in major and minor

Wednesday 27 September, 2006

The cancellation of the Mozart opera "Idomeneo" in Berlin's Deutsche Oper for fear of reprisals from the Muslim community has unleashed a storm of protest. Harald Jähner, feuilleton editor of the Berliner Zeitung, finds the opera house's decision not only cowardly but dangerous.
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Bing Dian Stories

Wednesday 27 September, 2006

On Saturday, the Lettre Ulysses Award, the only international prize for literary reporting, will be awarded in Berlin. We are offering a sneak preview of one of the texts: Li Datong's report of the legendary career of a Chinese village tyrant. It was one of the several critical texts for which the Beijing-based journalist lost his job.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 26 September, 2006

In Outlook India, Vikram Seth asks if bisexuality is a crime. In Nepszabadsag, Peter Esterhazy and Peter Nadas defend their Prime Minister Gyurcsany - even if he did lie. In the New York Review of Books, Timothy Garton Ash reflects on Islam in Europe. In the Nouvel Obs, Julian Barnes writes "Madame Bovary" anew. Al Ahram grumbles about the Pope's speech in Regensburg and Le Point grumbles about intellectual terrorism.
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Whipping boy Bush

Monday 25 September, 2006

On the fifth anniversary of 9/11, George Bush has become the perfect scapegoat. When attacks and threats increase, he is to blame. But the rise of international terrorism is not Bush's doing. We are not seeing a new Vietnam, but a new Chicago, an ethnic-theological Mafia and gang war. To accept, or not to accept, the law of the human bomb? That is the question facing our fledgling century. By Andre Glucksmann
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The banalisation of evil

Thursday 28 September, 2006

American first-time novelist Jonathan Littell has created the sensation of the French literary season with "Les Bienviellantes." Michael Mönninger describes the memoirs of a fictional SS officer as scandalous kitch, an epic panorama and eminently worth reading.
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Faith, pop and charity

Thursday 21 September, 2006

Berlin is host to the music trade fair Popkomm. For the first time since the Internet boom and bust in 2000, things are looking up for pop music. After years of steady decline, shrinking sales figures and what looked like certain death, hope has come back to the music industry. By Tobias Rapp
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The book doesn't smell either

Wednesday 20 September, 2006

It's finally happened. The film version of Patrick Süskind's mega-hit "Perfume" has hit the screens. Director Tom Tykwer talks with Dietmar Kammerer about his passion for the project, his proximity to the central figure - a serial killer in pursuit of love - and covering whole neighbourhoods with a layer of filth.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 19 September, 2006

Outlook India remembers the 65,000 Indian soldiers who died in WWI. Die Weltwoche describes the new Internet boom as a sort of giant sing-along. In the London Review of Books, Tony Judt searches for the American liberals and finds only a service class. Il Foglio portrays the Social Democrat Euro MP Lilli Gruber. Elet es Irodalom visits the garden of Budapest's Dohany Synagogue, a memorial to Hungarian embarrassment. The TLS wades its way through 2000 years of medical misadventure. In Le Figaro, philosopher Philippe Raynaud analyses France's extreme Left. The New York Times hails in the age of satire.
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Benedict and the value gap

Tuesday 19 September, 2006

Pope Benedict XVI's Regensburg speech gives no rational ground for the commotion now being stirred up from Pakistan to Europe. In our globalised, individualised and thoroughly economicised world, the purely technical use of reason threatens to bring about a value gap. That the Pope should try to close this gap with religious means may not have proved effective, yet this is exactly where all believers should find common ground. By Stephan Hebel
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Drinking from a different spring

Thursday 14 September, 2005

Once one of most flamboyant, talked about musicians on the international scene, Croatian pianist Ivo Pogorelich withdrew from the public eye after the death of his wife and teacher, Aliza Kezeradze. Now he breaks a long media silence to speak of early fame, his lost love and late maturity. By Manuel Brug
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The mighty hausfrau

Wednesday 13 September, 2006

The German housewife is the pillar of the nation - she cleans, organises, supports, nourishes and forgets that at one time, she had professional aspirations. Susanne Mayer takes a look at the employment situation of German women and concludes that the state is investing far too much in folded underwear.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 12 September, 2006

In Guardian, Martin Amis sees an era of horror approaching. The Weltwoche visits Chechnyan Prime Minister and gangster Ramsan Kadyrov. Folio takes a close look at the booming business at private military companies. Al Ahram sees itself stuck between American imperialists and Islamic fundamentalists. Il Foglio admires Rome's mayor. Merkur inspects Germany's new class society. Radar hears tango as a beat from the underground. Le Monde exposes the aftermath of Katrina as the biggest scam of all time.
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The Mozart guerilla

Monday 11 September, 2006

The covert avant-garde of world cinema has taken the Venice Film Festival by storm. This year's Mostra featured four cinematographic homages to Mozart commissioned by Peter Sellars, director of Vienna's New Crowned Hope festival. By Katja Nicodemus
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Always caviar

Thursday 7 September, 2006

Compared with their permatanned clientele, the chefs appear pale and lost in thought. The look of people who spend sleepless nights melding creative relationships between marinated Barbary duck and puff pastry with ginger. Margrit Sprecher on the annual pig-out in the mountains that is the St. Moritz Gourmet Festival.
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Stepping out of the fire

Wednesday 6 September, 2006

Having been violently attacked by the husband of one of her clients, the Berlin lawyer and Islam critic Seyran Ates has closed her legal practice. A fighter for human rights resigns. By Mariam Lau
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 5 September, 2006

The New Yorker portrays "Junior", a true problem child and America's most valuable Al Qaeda informant. In The Spectator, Alan Dershowitz calls for a liberal initiative against terror. Outlook India celebrates the new Ghandi youth, who organise motorcycle rallies for peace with Pakistan. In Literaturen, Ilija Trojanow vaunts the Bombaywalla's talent for the poisonous declaration of love. Polityka praises Olga Tokarczuk's new book about the Sumarian goddess Inanna. The Nouvel Obs describes the precarious life of France's writing class. And The New York Times warns against the unobtrusive American.
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Bucking the blockbuster

Monday 4 September, 2006

Paris is the cinephile's Garden of Eden, yet its arthouse screens are under threat. Having pursued their own form of artistic expression for over 80 years, the Parisian cinemas d'art et d'essai must now use all the ingenuity they can muster to keep bums on seats. By Marc Zitzmann
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