?From the great beyond into the present? ? an interview with Jo Lendle

Hanser publisher Jo Lendle talks about gentle adjustments of languages and marketing strategies.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Don Camillo and the Imam

Wednesday 28 November, 2007

Italy has been slow to address the danger of radical Islam. For too long it was the domain of right-wing rabble-rousers while the left slumbered away in "Islam correctness". At last the left-wing liberal Reset magazine has launched a proper debate. By Franz Haas
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Not my son

Monday 26 November, 2007

The Amsterdam district of Slotervaart, where Theo van Gogh's murderer lived, continues to be plagued by outbreaks of violence from youths in the immigrant communities. Many of their parents have withdrawn from what they perceive as the hostile outside world, which they invariably blame when their children go astray. By Margalith Kleijwegt
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesdsay 27 November, 2007

In the Boston Review, Abbas Milani gives the ultimate lowdown on Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Outlook India scrutinises the new men's movement against ex-wives. In Literaturen Daniel Kehlmann celebrates the elastic grammar of Heinrich von Kleist. Nepszabadsag and Elet es Irodalom ruminate intensively on the crisis in Hungary. Al Ahram is amazed by Islamic life in New York. In the Nouvel Obs, Anthony Giddens declares the European social model kaput. And the New York Times searches for suicide bombers in the Moroccan city of Tetuan.


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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 20 November, 2007

In the Gazeta Wyborcza, philosopher Michael Sandel comes down hard on affected neutrality. John Banville investigates pulp fiction in Bookforum. In L'Express, Garry Kasparov updates the old list of Russian oligarchs. Il Foglio notes an increase in dowry murders among Indian IT experts. Outlook India explains why so many women throw themselves in front of trains in London‘s Southall district. In Elet es Irodalm, Philosopher Miklos Tamas Gaspar reflects on the posthumous workings of Romania's Securitate. And The New York Times scrutinises the Sleep-Industrial Complex.
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A new cosmopolitanism is in the air

Wednesday 21 November, 2007

The global power of capital has no need for military force. And it is nigh on boundless. Sociologist Ulrich Beck presents seven theses for a better world.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 13 November, 2007

George Bush has plunged America into the worst slump since the Great Depression, writes Vanity Fair. In Nepszabadsag, sociologist Elemer Hankiss would like to see a bit more grit from Hungarian journalists. Il Foglio presents Al Jazeera's new competitor. Commentary remembers a gifted music critic who couldn't read a note. Literary scholar Eva Cs. Gyimesi introduces a Transylvanian magazine for Europe. And Le Point calls Marcel Gauchet the new Plato.
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Banished to the banlieues

Wednesday 14 November, 2007

The Parisian social sciences institutes are being turfed out of their ancestral homes in the city's most desirable arrondissements and relocated to Aubervilliers. A bitter pill, but also a chance to turn theory into practice. By Wolf Lepenies
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Bucharest in a trance

Monday 12 November, 2007

Romanian literature is still a tiny niche in the German book market. Mircea Cartarescu's latest novel to be published here, "Die Wissenden," shows readers what they are missing. A visit to Bucharest to meet the man who is probably Romania's most famous author. By Jörg Plath
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The spell of the poet führer

Wednesday 7 November, 2007

Come cruising in the park they say is dead. In his biography of Stefan George, Thomas Karlauf reveals the charismatic German poet's authoritarian practices and the homoerotic core of his work. By Alexander Cammann


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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 6 November, 2007

In the New York Review of Books, Sergei Kovalev paints a grim picture of Putin's Byzantine system. In Asharq al-Awsat, French-Syrian sociologist Burhan Ghalioun declares the conspiracy theory to be the enemy of the Arab world. In Gazeta Wyborcza, philosopher Bronislaw Lagowski explains the left's weak footing among the Polish people. In Le Point, Philip Roth resists all attempts to reduce erections to trifles. The TLS criticises solipsistic anti-democratic coffee consumption. And Folio indulges in a spot of sole searching.
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The universal spirit takes a walk

Monday 5 November, 2007

Thuringia and Saxony Anhalt are two of Germany's most neglected states today, yet they make up the country's cultural heart. Gustav Seibt drives two hundred kilometres south of Berlin to the land of Bach, Goethe and Hegel that brought forth Bauhaus, Protestantism and the German Enlightenment.
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