The Local View ? Neighbourhood Cinemas and Alternative Film Projects

Many small neighbourhood cinemas invested in the future. The digital options for showing films are opening up new vistas for alternative projects. Not all of them are legal.... more more

GoetheInstitute

The anti-Semitism of the 68ers

Monday 31 October, 2005

In 1969 a leftist militant group planted a bomb in the Jewish Community Centre in Berlin. An isolated incident? Or did a "leftist anti-Semitism" exist among the German 68ers? And why is the whole issue being dealt with so hesitantly? Philipp Gessler and Stefan Reinecke interview Tilman Fichter, former SDS head and brother of Albert Fichter, who planted the bomb.
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The bright side of the moon

Wednesday 26 October, 2005

Guest of honour at the Frankfurt Book Fair, Korea presented a lively mix emphasising both tradition and transformation. In the absence of North Korea, politics was blended out and culture did the talking. By Andreas Breitenstein
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Disillusioned but not disoriented

Thursday 27 October, 2005

Thomas Ostermeier, director at Berlin's Schaubühne, has staged "Hedda Gabler". Henrik Ibsen, he says, has a lot to say about the world as we know it: morally improverished, metaphysically empty but not without hope.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 25 October, 2005

Prospect bemoans the decline of the theatre critic. In Reportajes, Mario Vargas Llosa praises cultural life in bankrupt Berlin. Umberto Eco explains in L'Espresso the difference between bullshit and balderdash. The New Yorker writes a portrait of architect Santiago Calatrava. Adam Zagajewski tells in Plus-Minus what life in Paris is like for a poet. In The Guardian, Ian McEwan looks forward to a new edition of Peter Schneider's "The Wall Jumper". Al-Ahram hopes the Nobel Prize for Harold Pinter will give Egyptian intellectuals more gumption. The Spectator looks at Russia's death throes. And in Le Point, Regis Debray sees nothing but pyschosis and perversion in theatre today.
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Project Migration

Monday 24 October, 2005

Walking, walking, walking. Projekt Migration is an extensive exhibition with film and music programmes telling the story of migration from the perspective of those in motion. By Katrin Bettina Müller
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Please touch!

Friday 21 October, 2005

Korea is the featured country at this year's Book Fair in Frankfurt. Poet Hwang Chi Woo, head of the Korean delegation, reflects on the difference between the visual culture of Europe and the sensual culture of Korea. Where he comes from, Western aesthetic categories simply don't apply.
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The new wretched of the earth

Tuesday 25 October, 2005

Sengalese writer and journalist Boubacar Boris Diop describes the combination of pain, shame and anger that he feels looking at the images of utter desperation that are coming out of the Spanish exclaves Ceuta and Melilla.
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"Please God, come back from holiday"

Thursday 20 October, 2005

Helena Waldmann is the first female director from the West to have been invited to work in Iran. The result of her project "Letters from Tentland" is now touring Europe. An interview with Sylvia Staude.
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A stone's throw from Europe

Wednesday 19 October, 2005

In the heated debate over Turkey's entry into the EU, something is being forgotten: the fact that the two continents are within spitting distance of each other. And that Europe in its current form would not exist were it not for the Middle East. By Hilal Sezgin
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Korean literature in flux

Tuesday 18 October, 2005

The country in focus at this year's Frankfurt Book Fair is Korea. Katharina Borchardt takes a look at the abundance of recently translated works and discovers a literature full of contrast and in the midst of change.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 18 October, 2005

In the New York Review of Books, Timothy Garton Ash admires Iranian women's bikinis. Le Monde diplomatique delves into the origins of language. In Plus-Minus, philosopher Wojciech Sadurski hopes for a United States of Europe. The Spectator hates the Blairpop of Coldplay, Franz Ferdinand and all such wimps. The London Review of Books reads in Andrew Bacevich how Americans love their military but refuse to serve in it. In Le Point, Mario Vargas Llosa wishes for a French Tony Blair.
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Preacher of the profane

Monday 17 October, 2005

The time of the master thinkers is over. Or so they say. Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben is a beacon for an entire generation of young intellectuals across Europe. Every epoch gets the fashion philosophy it deserves. By Daniel Binswanger
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Dying to reach Europe

Thursday 13 October, 2005

For three years, Portugese author and journalist Paulo Moura has focussed his reportages on the plight of African refugees in Morocco. Using literary means, he seeks to go deeper than news reports. An interview with Christa Hager.
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Writing is the food of the gods

Wednesday 12 October, 2005

Austrian poet Friederike Mayröcker has written a new book of prose, "And I shook a darling", haunted by the ghost of her life-long companion Ernst Jandl, who died in 2000. By Christina Weiss
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 11 October, 2005

Lettre publishes excerpts from the essays of the seven finalists for the Lettre Ulysses Award. In Radar, the poet Silvina Ocampo explains how the song of the little ape is the most pleasing of all. Gazeta Wyborcza considers the relationship between Belarus and Europe. In Polityka, Dorota Maslowska describes her trip to Moscow. In Du magazine, Sybille Lewitscharoff considers the work of the devil in modernity. And Weltwoche offers a portrait of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi.
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Prospect's blunder

Monday 10 October, 2005

Prospect magazine's list of the world's top 100 public intellectuals speaks tellingly about the provincialism of today's global media, but says nothing about the ideas behind today's global world. By Arno Widmann
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Mr Metabolism

Wednesday 5 October, 2005

Marx said, the point is to change the world. It's a philosophy that Japanese architect Kisho Kurokawa has lived to the full. The Deutsche Architektur Zentrum in Berlin is currently showing showing a selection of his dynamic work. By Ronald Berg
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 4 October, 2005

In L'Express, Salman Rushdie explains why Indian left-wing intellectuals have branded him an Islamic separatist on the Kashmir issue. Holmi celebrates Janos Terey's drama "The Nibelung Subdivision". In the Guardian, playwright Tom Stoppard visits his colleagues in Belarus where a chasm opens between form and content. In Literaturen, Michael Frayn confesses his lazy reading habits. And the Economist hopes for a grand coalition on the scale of Kurt Kiesinger and Willy Brandt.
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You are the wings! You are the tree! You are Germany!

Monday 3 October, 2005

Just when the old gags about the Germans were really starting to wear thin, the German media go and launch a full-scale positive-thinking campaign to try to get the people to pull their weight. Harald Jähner unwittingly witnessed the "Du bist Deutschland!" (you are Germany!) advert on TV, and had to pinch himself to check he wasn't dreaming.
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