On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 29 January, 2008

The New York Review of Books is fascinated by bloggers. The Independent celebrates the free market of ideas on the web. In ADN cultura we witness the birth of a literary canon. In Nepszabadsag Csaba Gombar ruminates on dog-whistle politics. In Outlook India Arundhati Roy mentally accompanies Harant Dink's coffin through the streets of Istanbul. In Odra, Ludwik Tomialojc shivers at the thought of a nuclear power plant in Poland. In Espresso Umberto Eco has the function of political opposition explained to him. And The Economist watches Rupert Murdoch fail in China.
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Organic or bust

Wednesday 24 January, 2008

The Berlin district of Prenzlauer Berg is the playground of the new Germany. But unless you fit in, life can be tough among the beautiful creatives of a gated community that needs no wall. By Henning Sußebach
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 22 January, 2008

In the Chronicle of Higher Education, Laurie Fendrich talks about introducing students to Rousseau's views on women and the theatre. In Nouvel Obs, Abdelwahab Meddeb is hopeful about Iran. The New Republic is up in arms about the anti-Semitic views of Irene Nemirovsky, who was killed in Auschwitz. In the London Review of Books, Eric Hobsbawm gets very excited about the Weimar Republic. Il Foglio describes the close links between pop and drug cartels in Mexico. And Przekroj discovers Polish expats in Ukraine.
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Waking a Polish demon

Monday 21 January, 2008

"Fear" is the punchy title of book about Polish anti-Semitism whose recent publication in Poland has sparked an emotional debate. Very few people have come to the defence of its author, Jan Tomasz Gross, who has taken on the difficult task of making uncomfortable facts known to a wider audience and removing blind spots in Polish history. By Jakub Kloc-Konkolowicz
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Double life is the drug

Wednesday 16 January, 2008

Kurt von Hammerstein was head of the Reichswehr, a grand seigneur, and an implacable opponent of National Socialism. In his new book "Hammerstein oder Der Eigensinn" (Hammerstein or idiosycrasy), Hans Magnus Enzensberger engages in dialogues with the dead to deliver a literary and lunatic precipitate of German history.
By Ina Hartwig
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 15 January, 2007

In the Nouvel Obs, Algerian writer Boualem Sansal sees only a fine line between Islamism and Nazism. Nueva Sociedad embarks on an odyssey through Mexico City. In Elet es Irodalom, theologian Tamas Majsai wants to see the Church taking a stand against the Hungarian Guard. As long as skirts are being worn short in Indonesia, The Economist reassures us, there's no need to fear Islamism. Philosopher Frederic Worms recommends Henri Bergson as "an antidote to depression" in Le Point. In the New York Times, Steven Pinker dwells on morality and lifestyle.
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Julia Fischer: Virtuosissima!!!

Thursday 10 January, 2008

At the New Year's concert in the Alte Oper in Frankfurt the audience's excitement was palpable. It was patently clear to all assembled that they were either about to witness the disgrace of one of the world's greatest living violinists, or the triumphant birth of a new piano virtuoso. By Arno Widmann
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 8 January, 2008

In Outlook India, Taslima Nasrin feels like the living dead. The New York Review of Books introduces an Iraq blog. In Le Nouvel Obs, Catherine Millet remembers the cold, intellectual eroticism of Simone de Beauvoir. Plus-Minus takes its hat off to Sweden's treatment of foreign cultural treasures. The Guardian shines a torch into the world of bibliotherapy. In Die Weltwoche, General Petraeus puts us in the loop about al-Qaeda's anti-smoking strategy. And Folio uncovers plans to create a second Jewish land.
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Back to Rudi Dutschke's pram

Monday 7 January, 2008

So what was 1968? It was when the children of German mass murderers ran after mass murderer Mao Tsedong, says historian and ex-Maoist Götz Aly. Absolutely not, says educationalist and author Katharina Rutschky: The practice of dispelling fascism in the kindergarten was far more important than ideology. Stefan Reinecke and Jan Feddersen preside over a full-blown row.
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The fuel of the Internet

Thursday 3 January, 2008

Give me back my hierarchical media system! Print journalists live in fear of the death of "good journalism" through Web 2.0 and yet a blogger was nominated Germany's journalist of 2007. While the discourse rumbles on Google is noiselessly earning 3 euros a month from millions of German users. By Robin Meyer-Lucht
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Magazine Roundup

Wednesday 2 January, 2008

Il Foglio tells a Catholic tale of heroism from Siberia. Prospect describes the spin-offs of new Irish wealth. Literaturen asks writers about living from the pen. ADN cultura introduces the blogging writers from Brazil. Elet es Irodalom shines a light into the darkest corners of the Hungarian debate. ResetDoc debates Islam and the western left. And the London Review of Books kindly demystifies the credit crunch.
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