?From the great beyond into the present? ? an interview with Jo Lendle

Hanser publisher Jo Lendle talks about gentle adjustments of languages and marketing strategies.... more more

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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 31 January, 2006

Elet es Irodalom documents the spy reports that Istvan Szabo wrote for the Hungarian secret police as a film student. In Nepszabadsag, Szabo explains that he is proud of his collaboration because it enabled him to save a life. The Spectator would prefer not to touch Hitler's red telephone. In Prospect, William Davies demands an ethics of inconvenience. Przekroj believes that only Moscow can prevent Iran from making an atomic bomb. In the TLS, Canadian composer Stephen Brown explains what Mozart and Sid Vicious have in common. The New York Times settles the score with Bernard-Henri Levy's book on America.
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Tango in a mine field

Tuesday 31 January, 2006

Germany is the guest of honour at this year's Cairo International Book Fair. With a diversity of cultural themes, the German organisers have honoured the Egyptian side as only a glamorous tango-dancer can do, writes Egyptian author Ahmed Alaidy. But why did they give the cold shoulder to publisher and opposition member Muhammad Hashim?
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"Cowardly and comfortable"

Monday 30 January, 2006

In Michael Haneke's new film "Cache", a Parisian citizen is confronted with a dark episode from his childhood – and suddenly France's colonial history comes rushing to the surface. The Austrian director talked to Dominik Kamalzadeh about guilt, guilty consciences and the legacy of the Algerian war.
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Melancholy is mandatory

Thursday 26 January, 2006

Poet Helga M. Novak talks to Uta Beiküfner about the fascination of socialism, travelling to where the action is and the unexpected blessings of the madhouse. (Photo © Renate von Mangoldt)
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A hard-nosed Utopian

Wednesday 25 January, 2006

Making audiences happy makes other people suspicious. Max Reinhardt not only staged theatre in Berlin, he also built and ran several of them very successfully. He democratised the closed world of theatre, but he has never been able to shake the accusation of being apolitical. By Esther Slevogt
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 24 January, 2006

In the New York Review of Books, Timothy Garton Ash calls the Kaczynski twins old brooms. In The New Republic, Egyptian dramatist Ali Salem puts himself in the mind of a terrorist. Andrzej Stasiuk tromps through Albania's Cursed Mountains for L'Espresso. The London Review of Books compares Google with the railways. In Revista de Libros, Juan Villoro says men who want to talk about love should get help. In Magyar Narancs, Eva Standeisky investigates the relationship between writers and power. Die Weltwoche gets into a fight and the New York Times Magazine looks at animals that can't tell the difference between sex and dinner.
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An uprising twice suppressed

Monday 23 January, 2006

This year is the fiftieth anniversary of the Hungarian Uprising of 1956, when the Hungarian people attempted to throw off the yoke of Soviet occupation - to no avail. Hungary faces a year of commemoration fraught with conflict. A chance to reflect on a peculiar tradition in the country's culture of memory: commemoration by not remembering. By Laszlo F. Földenyi.
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Poetry of the body

Friday 20 January, 2006

From Wuppertal into the world: At 33, choreographer Marco Goecke is a force to be reckoned with on the international dance scene. By Jochen Schmidt
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Turkey's growing pains

Thursday 19 January, 2006

The autumn of 2005 was marked by the anniversary of the founding of the Turkish Repubic, the start of EU accession talks and, most importantly, the first open discussions in the country about the Armenian genocide. Seyla Benhabib looks at changing attitudes in Turkey toward its past and its multicultural legacy.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 17 January, 2006

Outlook India goes in search of India's missing Hindu girls. The Economist doesn't believe in Alan Greenspan. Il Foglio asks who's afraid of Mozart. Laszlo Földenyi celebrates the power of Dadaism in Elet es Irodalom. In Polityka, Andrei Konchalovsky proclaims his contempt of democracy. The Weltwoche reports on stolen art in Switzerland. In L'Express, Nicolas Baverez tries to wake up Western democracies. The New York Times Book Review describes Julian Barnes' indescribable "Arthur and George".
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Of patrons and princes of painting

Monday 16 January, 2006

Two billionaire families are rivalling to become Turkey's biggest sponsors of the arts. The Sabanci Museum is now trumping with the show "Picasso in Istanbul". By Elke Buhr
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Fearing feelings more than fire

Thursday 12 January, 2006

Patrice Chereau describes his newest film "Gabrielle" and the challenge of adapting Joseph Conrad for the screen. An interview with Gerhard Midding.

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Hoping for a game without fouls

Wednesday 11 January, 2006

An interview with Gdansk author Pawel Huelle on the new Polish government, anti-Semitism in Poland and Kaczynski's "moral revolution". By Gerhard Gnauck
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 10 January, 2006

John Berger writes in Clarin about the silent message of Israeli settlements in Palestine. In The Guardian, Pankaj Mishra is tired of hearing from writers in hotels. In the Nouvel Obs, Michel Rocard is the only French person with anything bad to say about Mitterrand. Magyar Hirlap is annoyed at an online game on the 1956 Hungarian Uprising. Folio brings statistics alive. Outlook India describes the newest thing in fitness with an aura of wisdom. The New Yorker has seen at least one good film in 2005: Fatih Akin's "Head On". And The New York Times looks at "the hottest thing on earth" - the paintings of the New Leipzig School.
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Confessions of a leftist bookseller

Monday 9 January, 2006

Bookseller and editor Bettina Wassmann has been at the heart of the German book trade for almost forty-five years. She talks with Gabriele Goettle about her apprenticeship in Berlin and the heyday of the political bookstore, her philosopher husband Alfred Sohn-Rethel and making literary history.
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The many names of loneliness

Thursday 5 January, 2006

Andreas Dresen's "Summer in Berlin" hits the screens in Germany today. The sunny milieu film tells of cool nights, hard liquor and love in the time of Hartz IV. By Christoph Dieckmann
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Off with Mozart's wig

Wednesday 4 January, 2006

250 years after his birth, 2006 is Mozart Year. To perform Mozart you need maturity without having lost a youthful touch. A new generation of young talents has put out a selection of recordings, from the sluggish to the sublime. By Wolfram Goertz

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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 3 January, 2006

In Granta, Lindsey Hilsum reports on the Sino-African trade revolution. Al Ahram describes the culture shock at the election success of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt. In Espresso, Umberto Eco warns about an excess of change. The Hungarian ES magazine accompanies the spirit of writer Miklos Meszöly through Trieste. In Der Spiegel, Karl Schlögel predicts a European renaissance in Eastern Europe. And the New York Times Magazine portrays the Ukrainian Eva Perón.
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Der fünfte Beatle

Monday 2 January, 2006

For over twenty years, Klaus Beyer has dedicated himself to converting the Beatles into German. He has just released his eighth album, "Helft!", a brilliantly squeaky psychedelic version of "Help!", and a DVD of his home-made videos. By Detlef Kuhlbrodt
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