The Russians must reflect on the evildoings

Thursday 29 April, 2010

The historically strained relations between Russia and Poland seem to be improving at long last, thanks to the considerable show of Russian sympathy at the funeral of the Polish president Lech Kaczynski. It remains to be seen whether these positive developments will continue beyond a short-lived expression of mourning. An interview with Arseni Roginski, the president of the Russian human rights organisation "Memorial", by Ulrich M. Schmid.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 27 April, 2010

In Eurozine, Kenan Malik asks what makes a real Muslim. For Osteuropa, Serhij Zadan travels though Ukraine's death valley. Wired visits old hackers. The most pig-headed of them, Richard Stallman, explains in the Boston Review, why cloud computing means thinking like a sucker. Frontline crosses the digital divide to where linux has transformed the lives of children in rural Bengal. The NYRB looks at why, after receiving 26 billion dollars in aid, Ethiopians are still hungry. In Magazin, the psychoanalyst Jürg Atlin warns about over-enthusiasm for cleansing in the wake of the paedophile scandals. Magyar Naracs observes a sacralisation of the state in Poland.
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"Don't turn your backs now"

Wednesday 21 April, 2010

Hungary swung sharply to the right in its recent elections, in what the new premier Victor Orban called "the great transition". Peter Nadas talks to Jörg Lau about the lack of stability in his country on the eve of its EU presidency, and about the responsibility of the west.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 20 April, 2010

In Salon, Viktor Erofeyev explains what Katyn means to the Russians. Krytyka Polityczna cannot understand the Polish hysteria over Lech Kaczynski. N+1 is impressed by Brian Ferneyhough's will to avant-garde. Opendemocracy predicts a bumpy ride for Hungary. The Nation celebrates the rodent-nibbled photographs of Miroslav Tichy. In Le Monde, Michel Onfray is hoisted by his own petard while fulminating about "pissoir literature". In the London Review, Benjamin Kunkel celebrates the majestic style of Marxist thinker Fredric Jameson. The Boston Globe gives the cream to the copycats.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 13 April, 2010

TeaserPicThe most worrying thing about the far-right Jobbik party is its appeal for young intellectuals, writes Elet es Irodalom. In Le Point, Bernard-Henri Levy asks whether Godard was an anti-Semite. Adam Michnik pays his respects to Lech Kaczynski in the Gazeta Wyborcza. Prospect describes how respect for the religious feelings of Muslims is causing many a British playwright to self-censor. In Le Monde, Tahar Ben Jelloun sees a black cloud over the banlieues. Edith Grossman remembers the dark clouds that came with "Don Quixote". Paul Krugman builds a green economy for the New York Times Magazine.
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The scramble for Timbuktu

Monday 12 April, 2010

In Timbuktu, Islamic Africa is rediscovering its written culture. Charlotte Wiedemann travelled to the site of the oldest library south of the Sahara to report on the race for influence over this ancient heritage, played out on a small stage of sand and parchment.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 6 April, 2010

TeaserPicThe Nation reveals why Raul Hilberg was so bitter about Hannah Ahrendt. In Nepszabadsag, Agnes Heller tells the Hungarians, on the eve of their general election, not to be cowed by the far-right. In the LRB, Colm Toibin studies the fly on the scarf of Giovanni Agostino della Torre. In Telerama, Claire Denis declares her love for the Foreign Legion. Tygodnik believes that the Mexicans understand Kapuscinski better than the Poles. The New York Times investigates the love that dare not squawk its name.
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