On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Sexing the handbag

Wednesday 31 October, 2007

The sexual revolution has run itself aground on the back of standardisation and banality. It's time to fight Hefnerism with radicalisation not restriction, declares Dylan van Rijsbergen

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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 30 October, 2007

The New Yorker recapitulates the history of the universal library and discovers some predecessors of websites like ours. Outlook India portrays the first Indian American governor in US history. Merkur explains who pays the price for the CFA franc. In Nepszabadsag, poet Akos Szilagyi reflects on asymmetrical wars. The Economist unravels the term "armed social work." In Le Point, Peter Sloterdijk holds up his geiger counter to French lunacy. And in The New Statesman, dramatist Kwame Kwei-Armah asks why black British actors have to leave for the States if they want a career, and not just a job.
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Good comrades

Monday 29 October, 2007

Last week the 1945 Rechnitz massacre hit the headlines after British journalist David Litchfield maintained that Countess Margit von Batthyany, partial heir to the Thyssen industrial family, had taken part in the atrocity. But such speculations belong to the boulevard press. The real issue is the scandalous role of the German postwar criminal justice system in letting the perpetrators escape Germany unharmed. By Stefan Klemp
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Kylwyria - Kálvária

Wednesday 24 October, 2007

Ligeti the gesamtkunstwerk, Ligeti the Socrates-Ligeti, Ligeti the volcano. Hungarian composer György Kurtág spoke at a memorial session of the Order Pour le Mérite in Berlin about his lifelong friend, György Ligeti, who died on June 12, 2006.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 23 October, 2007

The New York Review of Books doubts that Islam really is such a peaceful religion. Przekroj fears that Kosovo could divide the EU. In the Spectator, Norman Stone won't tolerate politics interfering with the work of historians. In Letras Libres, writer Gabriel Zaid lists the most common misunderstandings about culture. In Le Point philosopher Rene Girard says the end is nigh. And in Die Weltwoche Roger Schawinski singles out Die Weltwoche in a sea of mediocrity.


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The enchantment of the world

Monday 22 October, 2007

Rüdiger Safranski has pulled off the improbable: his book on Romanticism is a genuinely exciting account of German intellectual history. By Ulrich Greiner
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"Our negroes, our enemies"

Wednesday 17 October, 2007

TeaserPicSerbia is reclaiming Kosovo as the "cradle of the nation" while showing nothing but contempt for its population. Serbian writer Vladimir Arsenijevic outlines the calamitous relationship of his compatriots to the Albanians.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesdsay 16 October, 2007

The New Yorker introduces the well tempered Web. In Magyar Narancs author Richard Fekete uses the Internet to reach an audience the magazines avoid. The Economist casts a glance at grassroots organisations of middle-aged suburbanites. The Spectator surveys a Chinese prison from the inside. ResetDoc debates mosque construction in Italy. Il Foglio giggles over a big fat one. In Die Weltwoche, agricultural scientist Norman Borlaug tells the rich and spoilt: there is no such thing as no-risk. And Hollywood's ten most powerful women convene in Salon.com.
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Floundering Dutch man

Monday 15 October, 2007

A theme running through this year's Netherlands Film Festival is that of men running after deliverance, preferably in the form of young women. There's plenty of tongue in cheek but no changing the facts: the new man, like the old, needs a muse. By Jann Ruyters
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Let us now read about famous men

Wednesday 10 October, 2007

Germany's book market is being flooded this autumn by biographies of dead male writers. Ina Hartwig examines the whys, wherefores and potential pitfalls of this latest literary craze.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 9 October, 2007

How can one still be on the left, asks Bernard-Henri Levy in the Nouvel Obs. Trouw fans the flames of the Dutch integration debate. Il Foglio presents the only Native American in the Mussolini camp. Elet es Irodalom congratulates Magda Szabo, grande dame of Hungarian raconteurs, on her 90th. Steven Pinker explains in The New Republic the semantic distinction between making love and fucking. The New Statesman scrutinises the legacy of Che Guevara. And The New York Times is concerned about British libel law.
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Love and two coffins

Monday 8 October, 2007

German-Turkish director Fatih Akin's "The Edge of Heaven" won the best screen play award at Cannes. Now showing in German cinemas, it is a light, bright film about death, an optimistic requiem full of little utopias. By Katja Nicodemus


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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 2 October, 2007

The New York Review of Books declares Iran the winner of the Iraq War. NZZ's Folio magazine is thrilled at India's 2,000 dollar car. In Telerama, Belgian artists express their worries about the division of their country. Elet es Irodalom analyses populist trends in Hungary and Poland. Al Ahram debates the sense and nonsense of the fatwa. And L'Espresso shows how cabaret artist Beppe Grillo is opening up the democratic potential of the Web.
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