?From the great beyond into the present? ? an interview with Jo Lendle

Hanser publisher Jo Lendle talks about gentle adjustments of languages and marketing strategies.... more more

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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 30 March, 2010

In 3 Quarks Daily, we learn how someone can be considered "untouchable" and arrogant at the same time. Wired introduces a man with a savant-like ability to exploit security flaws. Tygodnik celebrates 65 years of being Catholic and not anti-Semitic. Newsweek asks whether the Ipad will turn the internet into a completely closed system. Slate reviews Paul Berman's new book on the Islam debate between Pascal Bruckner and Timothy Garton Ash. In Salon, Adam Michnik picks apart nationalism in the post-communist world. In Das Magazin, Elisabeth Badinter does not believe the hype about breastfeeding.
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Compromise, consensus and knee-capping

Monday 29 March, 2010

TeaserPicThe Dutch polder model is under threat. The PVV party of Dutch Islam critic Geert Wilders stands a good chance of victory in the next elections, which have been been brought forward to June. In the election campaign the Dutch elite will be hard pushed to steer political debate or discuss key issues in any nuanced way. By Hans Maarten van den Brink
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 23 March, 2010

In the NYRB, Edmund White falls under the spell of John Cheever and his graceful tragedy. Lettre International focusses on Iran, Istanbul and those who died in the First World War. In the Guardian, Tony Judt constructs a new liberal vision using the ideas of the grandfather of conservatism. In Outlook India, Arundhati Roy marches with the Maoists into the heart of India. In Nouvel Obs, Jorge Semprum and Hans Magnus Enszensberger exchange views about Germany.
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"Don't let this become a witch hunt"

Thursday 18 March, 2010

TeaserPicThe Austrian writer Josef Haslinger talks about his sexual encounters with paedophile priests as a boy in a Catholic boarding school. Instead of joining the chorus of moral outrage, he acknowledges the full spectrum of feelings that these episodes provoked, and argues that simple criminalisation is not the way forward.
Photo: Josef Haslinger by Tom Langdon
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 16 March, 2010

TeaserPicThe New York Times investigates the new hunger for reality. In Salon, Andrzej Stasiuk sees only individual realities. In the Gazeta Wyborcza, the ethnologist Tomasz Rakowski describes the reality of the Polish poor mines. Sometimes you can turn reality on its head, El Pais reads in the Financial Times. Le Monde diplomatique gives the low-down on the ACTA talks. And the New Yorker dreams of less polish and a bit more grit.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 9 March, 2010

In Magyar Narancs Agnes Heller demands more civil courage of the Hungarians. Mohammed Ali Atassi explains in Qantara, why conservatives in Egypt see women as candy: either wrapped or covered in flies. Oliver Roy outlines in Resetdoc, why's there not so much as a hair's breadth between the Christian right and the secular left. In Magazin, the philosopher Ludwig Haslar tells the Swiss that if they want mediocrity today, they cannot expect the superman tomorrow. Jonathan Safran Foer tells Prospect why he neither wants a chicken in his bed nor on his plate. The NYT embarks on a human-flesh search and finds a kitten killer.
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Kapuscinki's poetic license

Wednesday 10 March, 2010

Artur Domoslawksi's biography "Ryszard Kapuscinski non-fiction" sparked controversy even before it was published. Not only does it show the legendary reporter warts and all, it also shows where the reportage ends and fiction begins.  Polityka's Daniel Passent meets the author who, in spite of it all, still regards Kapuscinski as his friend and master.
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Call the spade a spade

Friday 5 March, 2010

TeaserPicSince its publication in January, Helene Hegemann's novel "Axolotl Roadkill" has been at the centre of a debate whose vagaries of terminology have allowed the seriousness of the case to be downplayed. Philipp Theisohn wishes the literary establishment would drop all its talk of intertextuality in favour of a more democratic category: plagiarism.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 2 March, 2010

The New Yorker tells the story of how corrupt podiatrists almost brought down the US health system. In Polityka, the Kapuscinski biographer Artur Domoslawski explains how he thinks the legendary reporter should be read. In Tygodnik, Zygmunt Bauman calls for more understanding for Kapuscinski. Magyar Narancs celebrates the ban on Holocaust denial in Hungary. In Le Point, Jorge Semprun asks whether Claude Lanzmann is the only person who's allowed to talk about the Holocaust. Wired describes how Google learned how to tell the difference between a hot dog and a poached pooch.
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