They?re Still Painting, and More: The Leipzig Art Scene

First a success, then a bubble: the hype surrounding the ?New Leipzig School? put the city on the map of the art world, but also blinkered its vision.... more more

GoetheInstitute

From Bombay with smog

Monday 11 June, 2007

In a new sequel of the NZZ's climate change series, Kiran Nagarkar affords a lung-clogging view from Bombay, where this winter the smog was a block of dirty concrete that started a couple of metres from where you stood and stretched all the way to the sky.
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Rain

Thursday 7 June, 2007

Continuing the NZZ's climate change series, Sri Lankan author Romesh Gunesekera tells how everything is perfect for the model farmer with a mathematical mind. Until the rain messes up his calculations.
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Black Christmas

Wednesday 30 May, 2007

In the NZZ's climate change series, Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie tells how Christmas changed in 2006, with choking heat and clammy bedsheets. Editor's note: The author has been announced the 2007 winner of the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction
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Underwater

Thursday 24 May, 2007

Continuing with the series, originally published in the NZZ, of first-hand accounts of climate change by international writers, Hans Maarten van den Brink talks of arks and dykes and watersport and the Dutch obsession with the sea.
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Seas of stone

Wednesday 23 May, 2007

The publication of the report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has kicked off a heavy debate which - as EU's the recent climate protection plans show - is affecting political decision-making. The NZZ feuilleton asked writers from far and wide to report on climate change from a personal point of view. The series begins with Swiss author Leo Tuor, who has felt the effects of the Earth's warming right up to his belly button.
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Books this Season

Wednesday 9 May, 2007

German writers make a big splash this season, in all age categories. And we meet fairies at a holiday camp in Sweden, ill-starred souls in Denmark, Piedmont people-smugglers and down-and-out Bulgarian writers. Nonfiction highlights include works by Ian Buruma and Anna Politkovskaya, histories of the Cold War and Prussia, and a sudden overview of contemporary art.
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Books this Season: Nonfiction

Wednesday 9 May, 2007

Political portraits of the Netherlands and Russia come from Ian Buruma and Anna Politkovskaya. British historian Christopher Clark has revealed new sides to Prussia. The ever so well behaved Adolph Freiherr von Knigge has regained dignity in a new biography. And Jörg Heiser finally helps us with an overview of contemporary art.
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Steppenwolf's archivist

Monday 7 May, 2007

Like a hunter-gatherer, Volker Michels has been foraging for traces of the life and work of author Hermann Hesse for thirty years now. For his private Hesse archive in Offenbach, he collects and cross-references all of Hesse's letters, pictures and manuscripts he can find. Roman Bucheli portrays an archivist on the brink of obsession. (Image © Gret Widmann)
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A writer in the Cold War

Monday 30 April, 2007

The case of anti-Communist Romanian novelist Vintila Horia (1915-1992) - condemned by some as pro-fascist - illustrates the difficulty of establishing a literary canon after the end of totalitarianism in Eastern Europe. Now, some Romanian intellectuals want to rehabilitate his image. Can the man be viewed separately from his art? By Richard Wagner
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The magician of the banal

Thursday 5 April, 2007

Ingo Schulze has reached new literary heights in his latest collection of short stories. Full of digressions and distractions, full of calculated humility, Schulze turns what seems to be non-art into art in its highest form. By Ulrich Greiner

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The source we drink from

Wednesday 28 March, 2007

It was only with the end of the Soviet Union that Russians got the chance to get discover their own 20th century literature. Forbidden authors like Nabokov, Mandelstam, Brodsky and Kharms became hugely popular. But until today the most enduring are the Oberiuts, a group of avant-garde poets from the 20s and 30s. By Olga Martynova
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The feeling that came in from the cold

Thursday 15 March, 2007

With her first novel "The Hour Between Dog and Wolf," Silke Scheuermann has written her way into the top league of young authors. The story is, once again, of young women saddled with privilege and boredom. But the language is cool, underwater movement and its author as intelligent as she is subtle. By Ulrich Greiner
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Auschwitz, our home

Thursday 15 February, 2007

Tadeusz Borowski survived Auschwitz, became a Communist, and committed suicide in 1951. A new edition of his stories was published in German this year: morally questionable, but a milestone in Holocaust literature nonetheless. Even Dante's "Inferno" pales by comparison. By Arno Lustiger
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Dostoevsky's dowager

Monday 12 February, 2007

TeaserPicSvetlana Geier's magnificent translation of Dostoevsky's "The Adolescent" brings to an end her monumental project of translating all five of the author's "elephants", or major novels, into German. Although many disparage the book as muddled, in her eyes it is Dostoevsky at his most modern. Martin Ebel has paid a visit to the Grande Dame of Russian-German translation. (Image © Niklaus Stauss)
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The dictator's orphans

Wednesday 31 January, 2007

Iraqi-German writer Najem Wali feels that the Arab Writers Union has a problem or two. It's overtly anti-Semitic, anti-democratic and opposed to freedom of speech. The Union doesn't realise that literature is not the product of conferences and pamphlets, but rather of freedom.
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