The Stanislau Phenomenon

Monday 6 February, 2006

How the Western Ukrainian provincial nest of Ivano-Frankivsk turned into a thriving literary metropolis and multicultural frontier between East and West. By Holger Gemba
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Melancholy is mandatory

Thursday 26 January, 2006

Poet Helga M. Novak talks to Uta Beiküfner about the fascination of socialism, travelling to where the action is and the unexpected blessings of the madhouse. (Photo © Renate von Mangoldt)
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The quest for Christa Wolf

Wednesday 21 December, 2005

Christa Wolf died on 1 Dec, aged 82. Fifteen years after reunification, Christa Wolf, a prominent German writer who chose to remain in East Germany and who was later branded a "state poet", talks with Hanns-Bruno Kammertöns and Stephan Lebert about private chats with Honecker, a German society in check mate, the influence of Goethe, the shortcomings of Brecht, and the lasting effects of Utopia.
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From Turkish boy to German writer

Monday 19 December, 2005

Gingerbread hearts, 4711, the lovely Petra and appalling paintings. Author Feridun Zaimoglu describes how growing up on a German diet eventually bore literary fruit.
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The carnival continues

Monday 7 November, 2005

Ukrainian poet and playwright Yuri Andrukhovych talks to Barbara Burckhardt about his new play "Orpheus, Illegal", the Orange Revolution, euphoria, disillusionment and Bubabu.
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Please touch!

Friday 21 October, 2005

Korea is the featured country at this year's Book Fair in Frankfurt. Poet Hwang Chi Woo, head of the Korean delegation, reflects on the difference between the visual culture of Europe and the sensual culture of Korea. Where he comes from, Western aesthetic categories simply don't apply.
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Journey to the Alaska of my past

Monday 19 September, 2005

"As I today, after many years, start off on a journey to the land of my birth, I feel as if I were leaving for Africa or Alaska. I am leaving for the unknown lands of my past without actually knowing why." Serbian author Bora Cosic visits his divided homeland for the first time since 1992.
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"Are you done? I've got things to do"

Friday 26 August, 2005

Marcel Reich-Ranicki is known as the Pope of literature – that's dumb. Because the Pope is not interested in erotica and his language is rarely juicy. Better: Marcel Reich-Ranicki is an 85-year-old pop star who entertains his audience with book reviews. A conversation with weak knees.
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Intimately connected to the Zeitgeist

Wednesday 24 August, 2005

American author Jonathan Franzen discusses his German literary influences, American playfulness and his "moral mission". An interview with Bernadette Conrad
(Photo © David Shankbone)
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"I like being several people"

Monday 11 July, 2005

"I don't stop being Turkish when I'm in the USA, and I'm also an American when I'm in Istanbul." Turkish novelist and professor of gender studies in Tucson, Arizona Elif Shafak talks to Arno Widmann about multiple identities, the joys of heterodoxy and the dangers of getting comfortable.
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The sweet taste of underground

Monday 6 June, 2005

The youngest generation of Polish writers has avidly taken up the political reality of unemployment, the suburban wasteland and consumption terror in a new spirit of anti-capitalism. But the scene's real superstar, Dorota Maslowska (born 1982), is convincing above all aesthetically. In her works, social misery becomes a virtuoso language game. Her second book, a rap poem, has just been presented at the Warsaw Book Fair. By Ina Hartwig
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"Ladies and gentlemen, Rolf Dieter Brinkmann"

Friday 22 April, 2005

Thirty years after his premature death, new CDs document readings and recitals by the poet Rolf Dieter Brinkmann. They demonstrate even more clearly than the collected texts and letters that Brinkmann's form of production was avantgarde. Listeners now accustomed to pop sounds will feel at home. Wasn't that an interesting noise? Doesn't a lot of this remind you of later low-fi albums and bootlegs? Brinkmann's breathless speaking takes up the "howl" of the beat generation, his lust for the loud is like concrete poetry. By Thomas Groß
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The Turkish trauma

Tuesday 19 April, 2005

For 200 years, since the end of the Greater Ottoman Empire, Turkey has been rehearsing the transition from one civilisation to another. And now the anti-European nationalists are gaining favor. The author Orhan Pamuk put his life on the line with "Snow", an overtly political novel about his country's problems. In an interview, Pamuk explains why his book has caused such vehement reactions in Turkey.
Editor's note of October 12, 2006: Orhan Pamuk is winner of this year's Nobel Prize in Literature.
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