The Local View ? Neighbourhood Cinemas and Alternative Film Projects

Many small neighbourhood cinemas invested in the future. The digital options for showing films are opening up new vistas for alternative projects. Not all of them are legal.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 18 September, 2007

In Le Point anthropologist Malek Chebel chips away at the taboo on slavery in Islam. The Economist counts Web 2.0 copycats in China. In L'Espresso, writer Suketu Mehta sees power in India shifting in the direction of the Dalits. In The New York Review of Books legal philosopher Richard Dworkin observes the Jacobin revolution in the US Supreme Court. In the London Review of Books historian Perrry Anderson attacks European narcissism. Hanna Schygulla in Die Weltwoche tells art where to go. And In Le Monde diplomatique, sinologist Wolfgang Kubin has trouble remounting his steed after a double liang.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 11 September, 2007

The New Yorker gets its teeth into planning the US defeat in Iraq. Le Monde discusses rights for robots. Al Hayat lashes out at authoritarianism and lack of transparency in Arabia. In Literaturen Andrzej Stasiuk is in the audience at the drama of Polishness. Figyelö condemns Hungary's unpalatable middle class. The Spectator travels to the wastelands of Rajasthan, so favourable for producing billionaires. Die Weltwoche looks for proof of the Collatz Conjecture. Trouw puzzles over Taliban Fritz and Guerillera Tanja. Il Foglio savours tripe soup in Istanbul. And the TLS wonders whether charisma and sprezzatura are thrust upon one.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 4 September, 2007

In Internationale Politik, Syrian philosopher Sadiq al-Asm describes Salman Rushdie as the new Galileo. Al Ahram is shocked to report that masturbation has replaced sex in Egypt. The Economist explains why the USA is so relaxed about mosque building. L'Espressso sets out on the trail of the Godfather of San Luca. In Gazeta Wyborcza, Adam Krzeminski and Heinrich August Winkler discuss the tangled web of German-Polish relations. Prospect bemoans the political apathy of the Indian middle classes. Outlook India is nonplussed by the world record holder in speed ketchup-drinking. In Nepszabadsag, Noam Chomsky claims that the USA was more socialist than Eastern Europe. And The New York Times enters the world of Rick Rubin.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 28 August, 2007

The New Yorker investigates big city agrarian life. Outlook India waits in vain for the independent Indian woman. The Jesuits have set up a mission in Second Life, reports Tygodnik Powszechny. The Boston Globe presents an elegant hatchet man - the new literary critic at The New Yorker. In Gazeta Wyborcza, director Jan Klata explains why he would no longer vote Kaczynski. V.S. Naipaul writes about Derek Walcott in The Guardian. Elet es Irodalom is not happy with the folklore image of Hungarians living abroad. Semana looks for the Latin American Bartleybys. And Dissent quarrels over Nick Cohen's book "What's Left?"
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 21 August, 2007

Merkur takes a stance against the supposed decadence of the West. In the New York Times, Mark Lilla writes on the politics of God and his modern prophets. The Economist is struck by how badly the CIA does its job. Outlook India portrays the feudal power wielded by the Owaisi family in the old town of Hyderabad. The Nouvel Observateur traces the sexism of philosophers. In the Guardian, Germaine Greer envisions under what circumstances Ann Hathaway may have read the sonnets of unfaithful Shakespeare.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 14 August, 2007

The TLS shudders at the Doomsday Machines of the real world. Outlook India celebrates 60 years of freedom from colonialism. In Le Figaro, historian Elisabeth G. Sledziewski bemoans French ignorance about the Warsaw Uprising. Il Foglio even admires Garibaldi's thousand mistakes. Magyar Narancs fears Northern Irish conditions in Hungary. The Economist presents a study in comparative dictatorships. And The New Yorker follows the posthumous rise of sci-fi writer Philip K. Dick.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 7 August, 2007

In The New York Times, Michael Ignatieff regrets having endorsed the Iraq War. The New Yorker examines the exclusive interrogation programme of the CIA. Al Hayat recommends Arab countries focus more on people and less on God, blood and soil. After an attack on critics of Islam, Afshin Ellian asks in Elsevier what distinguishes Amsterdam from Tehran. In Gazeta Wyborcza, Mykola Rjabtschuk fears Ukraine may have shifted eastwards. Magyar Hirlap bemoans the mentality of subservience in Hungary. The Spectator identifies digitally-savvy seniors as the true trendsetters. And Il Foglio reads the personal ads.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 31 July, 2007

The New York Times meets a friendly young humanoid named Merz. Tygodnik Powszechny mourns the loss of Warsaw's most international location, the Jarmark Europa. The Gazeta Wyborcza celebrates the imperfect white knights of Europe. Nepszabadsag examines a disembowelled Eastern Europe. Elet es Irodalom looks at a post-colonial Eastern Europe. In the Nouvel Obs, Marshall Sahlins describes the war in Iraq as the most irrational idiocy since the Athenian invasion of Sicily. And the Weltwoche features a lengthy interview with people collector, Walter Kempowski.


read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 24 July, 2007

In the New York Times, Bernhard-Henri Levy portrays Nicolas Sarkozy as a plunderer of national identities. Magyar Hirlap understands the Kaczynskis' fury over Europe. In Der Spiegel, Alexander Solzhenitsyn defends Vladimir Putin. Nepszabadsag detects fermenting at the roots in Hungary. The New Yorker portrays Abraham Burg, the herald of Zionism and its end. And Timothy Garton Ash gives Günter Grass half a point in the New York Review of Books.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 17 July, 2007

The Economist checks out the digital conversion of cinemas. Islamists are influencing children in Turkish classrooms, reports Die Weltwoche. Nepszabadsag reports that the Hungarian left has simply disappeared. In the New Yorker, William Dalrymple describes the dilemma of popular opposition in Pakistan. Reset.doc explains the struggle between the old and new elites in Turkey. Hungarian democracy is in serious danger, warns writer Peter Nadas in Elet es Irodalom.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 10 July, 2007

Osteuropa devoted an entire issue to Varlam Shalamov and his tales from the Gulag. Michail Ryklin describes the long-standing connection between Russian politics and professional crime. Outlook India watches the changing images of South Indians. Nepszabadsag is delighted by the sexual excess with which the EU is advertising Europe. And in Revista de Libros, Alberto Fuguet conjures up the perfect critic.


read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 3 July, 2007

Il Foglio gets a strong whiff of priest. Merkur analyses China's nationalism of victimhood. The London Review of Books remembers the event in China whose name is forbidden to mention. The New Yorker writes about the question that Jean Sibelius asked himself once too often. Outlook India criticises Salman Rushdie for his exaggerated interest in kissing. Gazeta Wyborcza tries to fathom the limits of anti-German phobia. The New York Review of Books describes Putin's weapons of choice for the press. Nepszabadsag worries about the ageing of Eastern Europe. Al Ahram despairs at the Arab world. And Die Weltwoche credits Hillary Clinton with the emotionality of a parking meter.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 26 June, 2007

In Lettre International, Mircea Cartarescu tells of the first woman he had sex with. The TLS sees a very dark future for Russia. Przekroj presents computer scientist Lukasz Foltyn, who is now entering politics. Outlook India shows the limits of Habermas' concept of public sphere in the Indian context. The New Yorker thinks it knows why Murdoch wants to buy the Wall Street Journal. Elet es Irodalom considers what is still the West European public. And Die Weltwoche finds documenta too elitist.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 19 June, 2007

American general Antonio M. Tabuga explains to Seymour Hersh in The New Yorker that the USA violated the Geneva Convention at Abu Ghraib. Il Foglio succumbs to the charm of Romanian minimalism at the Venice Biennale. The London Review of Books presents a history of the Berlin Wall. In Asharq al-Awsat, journalist Al-Sayed Yassin tells why he joined - then left - the Muslim Brotherhood in the 1950s. Elet es Iroladom denies that Clemenceau's Hungarian daughter-in-law was to blame for Hungary's losing major parts of its territory. Christopher Hitchens goes to bat for Marx in The Guardian. And The New Criterion investigates why the art world is a disaster.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 12 June, 2007

Two Polands are clashing, writes Adam Michnik in The New York Review of Books. In Elet es Irodalom, Peter Esterhazy is in awe of Poland's Catholic liberal intellectuals. Outlook India meets the Bhuttos, a Shakespearean royal family. Downright naive! writes historian Henri Beunders about Al Gore's book, "Assault on Reason" in Trouw. Umberto Eco separates the Piedmontese from the Neapolitans in the Nouvel Obs. Al Ahram introduces the Arab magic realist Ibrahim Farghali. And The New York Times takes a look inside the income gap.
read more