On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 17 November, 2009

TeaserPicIn OpenDemocracy, the Moscow poet Tatiana Sherbina tears her hair out over Russia's obsession with Stalin. Polityka celebrates a film where it's okay not to be heroic. The London Review of Books cements its friendship with Roland Barthes. In Espresso, Umberto Eco suggests removing Christ from classroom crucifixes. In the New York Review of Books, Timothy Garton Ash talks velvet and guillotines. Magyar Narancs talks candidly about the Roma. The New Yorker eats in secret with a Michelin inspector. In Letras Libras, writer Cesar Aira explains why people shouldn't be forced to read. And Newsweek sings a swansong to America, the land of innovation.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 10 November, 2009

In Open Democracy, Neal Ascherson wishes that the 1989 had had more French revolutionary zeal. Tygodnik remembers that Polish dissidents wanted German unity as far back as 1954. In Newsweek, Niall Ferguson argues that 1989 was not a patch on 1979. Laszlo Borhi hurls a rotten egg at Austrian's Social Democrats in Eurozine. Outlook India travels to Arunachal. Wired visits the Henry Ford of the information age. The New Republic embarks on a Peter Zumthor pilgrimage.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 3 November, 2009

TeaserPicOpenDemocracy tells of the Russian waves which are doing away with the Iranian sparrows. The London Review reads new books on honour killings. The Nation goes in search of the last Yugoslav, Dusan Makavejev. The Walrus weeps for the printed book. The Guardian navigates its way through Michael Haneke's oeuvre. Polityka tells the Poles that you can have ethics without Catholicism, or even God. In Dawn, Arundhati Roy defends the Maoist guerillas in India. In Frontline, the Maoist guerilla leader, Koteswa Rao, chats about revolutionary executions. In Le Monde, Vaclav Havel is still fascinated by his critics. And HVG explains why the Hungarians think capitalism comes from the communists.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 27 October, 2009

When Karadzic goes on trial in The Hague, the Hungarian plague will be tried alongside him, says the Magyar Narancs. The New Yorker explains why robots are better than husbands. In the New Republic, Enrique Krauze asks why Gabriel Garcia Marquez had such a thing for dictators. Europe has a sure footing in Turkey, Orhan Pamuk assures the Nouvel Obs. History is no recipe for how to live our lives today, the historian Karol Modzelewski tells Tygodnik Powszechny. N+1 tracks the rise of the neuronovel, and the TLS reads new Trotsky biographies.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 20 October, 2009

In Sinn und Form, Fritz Mierau tells of his journey to Koktebel. The London Review of Books reads a survival guide to working at the checkout. In Nouvel Obs, Yasmina Reza questions the legitimacy of Polanski's judges. In the New York Review of Books, Timothy Garton Ash has a job for a brilliant young historian. The New Statesman doesn't think de Gaulle could govern Nepal. In Nepszabadsag, Andra Gerö wants a return of the monarchy in Hungary. In Eurozine, Arne Ruth comes to terms with the past for the Swedes and Swiss, and Katharina Raabe makes a grand tour of eastern central European literature.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 13 October, 2009

TeaserPicEl Pais Seminal prints the affidavit of the death row inhabitant Romell Broom, whose execution was suspended after 18 failed attempts to give him the lethal injection. Hungarian and Polish magazines have joined in a chorus of consent that Roman Polanski deserves all he gets. Britain's problem, the Spectator intones, is not racism but 'cultural cloning". In the New Republic, Lawrence Lessig outlines the dangers of naked transparency in politics. In Le Monde diplomatique Shi Ming describes the hermeneutic acrobatics of the Chinese cultural industry.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 6 October, 2009

TeaserPicIn openDemocracy, Alexander Podrabinek remembers the true heroes of Russia: the anti-Soviets. In L'Espresso, Umberto Eco points to the existence of the right-wing intellectual. The Guardian reads a comic about Bertrand Russell's "Principia Mathematica". Juan Villoro opens a book in the hands of the future for ADN Cultura. Vanity Fair reports from the front of Rupert Murdoch's war against the Internet. Newsweek looks into the future of journalism and finds it "hyperlocal". Thomas Jefferson would never have signed the Google Book Settlement thinks Lewis Hyde in the New York Times.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 29 September, 2009

Mother Jones pulls the plug on the dirty water so beloved of Greens and high society alike: Fiji. Newspapers might be losing brand value online but journalists only stand to gain, says Le Monde. Not the future but the present is the real inspiration, French sociologist Michel Maffesoli tells Clarin. In Espresso, mafioso Francesco Fonti explains why Aldo Moro's kidnapping made his boss so nervous. In Poets and Writers, literary agent Georges Borschardt points to the one thing that changed the publishing industry most: the short-term contract.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 22 September, 2009

TeaserPicThe New York Times reads Carl Jung's "Red Book" with a shudder. In La vie des Idees, Eric Hobsbawm wonders how to start a revolution. Merkur magazine calls for a return of the hero. Walrus describes a day in the life of Al Jazeera. In Nepszabadsag, the political scientist Csaba Gombar is so over "post"-isms. Polityka celebrates the poet Juliusz Slowacki. Al Ahram compiles a list of failed Arab states.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 15 September, 2009

In the Atlantic, Robert D. Kaplan explains why he prefers watching Al Jazeera to CNN or BBC. Mark Bowden heralds in the "post-journalistic" age. In Tygodnik Powszechny, stage director Jan Klata explains predatory capitalism using a hundred-year-old book. In Espresso, John Berger gets on his motorbike and rides. In Elet es Irodalom, the historian Miklos Mitrovits wishes the Russians would stop using WWII as an excuse to flex imperialist muscle. In the New York Times, Leon Wieseltier doesn't see why Jews should vote like Episcopalians.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 8 September, 2009

TeaserPicThe New Yorker orders ceiling-high piles of boxes of shoes at Zappos. In Literaturen, Terezia Mora explains why the IT community is not interested in social climbing. In HVG, Agata Gordon explains why she'd rather be called homosocial than homosexual. The Guardian gets between the sheets with JM Coetzee. NZZ Folio sings the praises of the apprentice. The Chronicle of Higher Education is gobsmacked by Google's literary annus mirabilis of 1899.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 1 September, 2009

TeaserPicToday, on the anniversary of the outbreak of WWII, Russia plans to unveil secret documents detailing Poland's involvement, the Observer reports. In Przekroi, Tomasz Lubienski praises Poland for its great and righteous behaviour in a critical moment. The British online magazine, spiked, is horrified by what passed for quality journalism in the Swedish paper, Aftonbladet. Human rights were shaped in Haiti, Le Monde remembers. Standpoint asks why the world reacted with fury to the oppression of blacks, but reacts with silence to the oppression of women. And Hungarians can be child murderers too, Magyar Narancs concludes.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 28 July, 2009

TeaserPicNicholson Baker tests the Kindle for the New Yorker. In Polityka, the physicist Janusz Ostrowski describes his experience of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising as a fireman. Prospect reports on a media revolution that has seized Pakistan. The Economist reads the devastating UN report on the Arab world. L'Espresso reports on the consequences of a wrongly translated letter from the Pope to the underground Christians in China. In the New York Review of Books, Michael Messing thanks the bloggers for ushering in a new journalistic era.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 21 July, 2009

TeaserPicIn Poets & Writers, publisher Jonathan Galassi has a positive take on the digital future of books. The TLS will miss their smell. In the Gazeta Wyborcza, Leszek Kolakowski reveals the truth that he would die for. In The New Statesman, John Gray wants to see the term "Englightenment fundamentalist" reinstated. In Le Journal du Dimanche, BHL tells the French Socialist Party to throw in the towel. The New Yorker is counting calories to the next tax. In the Spectator, Iason Athanasiadis asks why the Iranians are so scared of the English. Foreign Policy sees a silver lining to the credit crisis: it should kill off machismo.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 14 July, 2009

TeaserPicThe TLS discovers how Sartre and de Beauvoir each got their hands on a Lanzmann pet. Le Monde remembers Europe's first terrorist to target a crowd at random. In the New Statesman, historian A.N. Wilson can no longer find any reasons to keep the monarchy. Al Ahram comments on the German reactions to the murder of Marwa al-Sherbini. In Le Point, Bernard-Henry Levi remembers the brutal killing of Ilan Halimi in Paris. NZZ Folio discovers a continent of garbage and a citrus-sweet-bitter chord to party in.
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