The Local View ? Neighbourhood Cinemas and Alternative Film Projects

Many small neighbourhood cinemas invested in the future. The digital options for showing films are opening up new vistas for alternative projects. Not all of them are legal.... more more

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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 20 February, 2007

De Groene Amsterdammer considers whether sex for Islamicists might not work wonders in combating the jihad. In The Spectator, John Gray bids farewell to the national aspiration to unite Brits of all colours. Asharq al-Awsat describes the religiously-motivated student unrest in Beirut. Alberto Fuguet travels into the digital night for Revista de Libros. In the Nouvel Obs, Bernard-Henri Levy lists three rules for the political engagement of intellectuals in elections.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 12 February, 2007

The Economist finds Ayaan Hirsi Ali's autobiography charming but a tad problematic. Tygodnik Powszechny comments on the race of conservative Poland to vilify Adam Michnik. Nepszabadsag no longer wants to look the indifferent Western Europeans in the eye. And in Nouvel Obs, Tariq Ali has abandoned all hope of Iraqi independence.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 6 February, 2007

NRC Handelsblad has read the Christian school version of the Dutch dictionary and calls for a "Halal" version as well. Al Ahram accuses a UN report on the Arab World of feminist propaganda. Ian Buruma explains Tariq Ramadan's media-friendly brand of Islamic socialism in The New York Times, and Ayaan Hirsi Ali tells The Observer who Ramadan really is. In Folio, Tehran artist Jinoos Taghizadeh extols the virtues of Iranian private space. HVG describes how Romanian newspapers make money by not publishing articles. And DU travels to sin city Asakusa.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 30 January, 2007

In Prospect, Francis Fukuyama asks post-modern European elites what they have to offer Muslim immigrants in the way of identity. In Al Hayat, Yassin Al-Haj Salih asks why the USA supported dissidents in Eastern Europe and despots in the Arab World. In Le Monde, a gynecologist describes his experiences helping Muslim women give birth. Tygodnik Powszechny sees Byzantium sliding closer to Brussels. And in Figaro, Paul Bocuse reminisces about the real Nouvelle Cuisine.
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Magazine Roundup

Tusaday 23 January, 2007

In Le Figaro, philosopher Remi Brague explains the sense and nonsense of the Heidegger debate, which reappears regularly every 20 years. Amir Taheri asks in Asharq Al-Awsat what Pope Benedict XVI means when he calls freedom a "mythical value." In The Guardian, Nick Cohen asks why the Left only supports fascist regimes. Outlook India murmers "poor Brits" after a Big Brother scandal. Joseph Stiglitz defends Hugo Chavez' economic recipe in Gazeta Wyborcza. And composer Ivan Madarasz talks about music and higher world orders in Nepszabadsag.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday January 16, 2007

Burn the burqa! Taslima Nasrin demands in Outlook India. Hungarian bishops should follow the example set by their Polish colleagues, Nepszabadsag writes wishfully. Vanity Fair looks at the rich white knights who are riding to the rescue of the newspapers. In Folio, anthropologist Nigel Barley recounts how he narrowly escaped having his penis peeled. The New Yorker portrays the only Al Qaida operative to use Monopoly metaphors. In Reportajes, arms dealer Carlos Cardoes describes Saddam Hussein's well-balanced personality. Il Foglio tells of the war of succession between the two octogenarian casino moguls of Macau. And in Al Hayat, the writer Ghalia Qabban is angered by the Tehran Holocaust conference.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 9 January, 2007

Lebanese, Iraqi and Syrian authors explain in Al Hayat why Saddam Hussein's execution was a mistake. In Espresso, Tahar Ben Jalloun fumes that the Americans failed to hang Augusto Pinochet as well. The Gazeta Wyborcza asks the Catholic Church to do a little cleaning up. In Die Weltwoche, Hans-Ulrich Wehler requests a little more bite from his students. And in the New York Times, the writer Richard Powers explains how he speaks his books.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 2 January, 2007

The London Review of Books has an idea why Hannah Arendt's critique of careerism is being ignored. In ScienceGuide, Frits van Oostrom wonders why the Dutch have no Churchills, Walesas or Mandelas. Literaturen dwells on Islam as the religion of the servant class. The Economist describes the French as the true conversation artists. In Le Point, Kenzabure Oe wishes Japan would adopt the French model of cultural hybridisation. In Elet es Irodalom, Peter Nadas ponders the nature of the European identity. And in New Yorker, Julian Barnes explains how the last dregs of his faith were driven out of him.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 19 December, 2006

Prospect wonders whether capitalism needs democracy. Writer Jerzy Pilch claims in Tygodnik Powszechny that happy people don't write books. Revista de Libros celebrates the Chilean Boswell, Adolfo Bioy Caseres. Gazeta Wyborcza fears that Cuba post Castro might borrow a leaf from Pinochet's Chile. In Le Point, Bernard-Henri Levy fears that Castro may follow Pinochet: yet another dictator allowed to die peacefully in bed. Magyar Hirlap recalls the famine that Ukraine was subjected to by Stalin. The TLS tells how Margaret Thatcher was charmed by a Spanish foreign minister. Die Weltwoche was kidnapped by the Taliban.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 12 December, 2006

In Lettre International, Bora Cosic describes the decadence of culture in Belgrade. The Economist points its finger at the machismo of the German press. In Vanity Fair, Christopher Hitchens ponders why women can never make him laugh. Asharq al-Awsat reports on the debates in the Arab Writer's Union. In Figaro, Pascal Bruckner demands a culture of courage in the West. The London Review of Books looks at an example of bio-sentimentality. And Tygodnik quips that the Pope nearly converted to Islam in Istanbul.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 5 December, 2006

Folio looks for freedom - in China, Russia, the Arab world and jail. Nepszabadsag bows before monsters in skirts and proud fairies - and before Magda Szabo, whose stories deal with both. In Gazeta Wyborcza, Dorota Maslowska says why drama is like maths. The TLS reads Thomas Pynchon's new novel as a protest against the experience of being obliterated. In DU, Felicitas Hoppe admits she can't swim before being baptised at the Equator. Wired wonders how it's possible to sell Meow Mix with exploding cats. In Elet es Irodalom, Laszlo Földenyi celebrates the shadowy paintings of Attila Szücs. And The New York Times tells the CIA to develop mob intelligence.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 28 November, 2006

Merkur testifies to the eccentricity of Europeans. In L'Espresso, Umberto Eco reads the Koran and Tertullian. The Weltwoche interviews Ahmed Scheikh of Al Jazeera. In Figaro, Alain Finkielkraut protects Robert Redeker from his "Yes, but..." defenders. The TLS is fed up with political moral apostles and Literaturen, with writings from the new politics of values. The British are buying Bulgaria, says Przekroj. And Nepszabadsag longs for capitalism with a human face.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 21 November, 2006

Die Weltwoche visits the jubilant Taliban. Author Hector Abad Faciolince writes in Semana that at least the Colombians seem to be fed up with killing. Prospect knows what would make England happy: Scottish independence. The New York Review of Books portrays Barack Obama, possibly the next president of the United States. Jonathan Israel summons NRC Handelsblad readers: Remember Spinoza! And Elet es Irodalom tells why Hungary is a nascent democracy.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday, 14 November, 2006

Historian Irfan Habib criticises the colonialists in Outlook India, while the Guardian limits itself to the bad colonialists. In Nepszabadsag, György Konrad sees the spirit of vendetta passing through south-east Europe. Elet es Irodalom sings praises of the Sulzbergers. Folio goes shopping. And in Le point, Bernhard-Henri Levy defends the Saddam trial.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 7 November, 2006

The magazines are worried about the state of democracy. In Gazeta Wyborcza, democracy in Poland reminds philosopher Leszek Koczanowicz of a sucked egg. The New York Times complains of Bush's intellectual dishonesty. In Elet es Irodalom, Janos Kis sees Hungary in a dead end. Outlook India describes the headscarf as a symbol of compromise. In Asharq al-Awsat, Algerian intellectuals are outraged at French hypocrisy. Al Ahram wants to have done with historical guilt. And in Die Weltwoche, Mario Vargas Llosa figures out what his Mexican-American cleaning lady must be making.
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