On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Revolution without guarantee

Monday 21 February, 2011

Saying revolution and freedom is not the same as saying democracy, respect for minorities, equal rights and good relations with neighbouring nations. All this has yet to be achieved. We welcome the Arab revolution and will continue to watch with our eyes open to the potential dangers. By Andre Glucksmann
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A journey into the heart of the enemy

Wednesday 21 May, 2008

On the 60th anniversary of the state of Israel, exiled Iraqi writer, Najem Wali, decided to go and survey the "enemy" territory with his own eyes. What he found was an explanation for the reluctance of Arab leaders to let their people make the same journey: the stagnation of Arab societies and economies cannot be blamed on Israel.
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The Sheikha's Book Club

Monday 9 July, 2007

A land of hidden longings: Ulla Lenze is the first German writer to be invited into the inner sanctum of Sheikha Shamma's literary salon, in the United Arab Emirates' desert palace of Al Ain. Lenze takes us along for the ride.
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The dictator's orphans

Wednesday 31 January, 2007

Iraqi-German writer Najem Wali feels that the Arab Writers Union has a problem or two. It's overtly anti-Semitic, anti-democratic and opposed to freedom of speech. The Union doesn't realise that literature is not the product of conferences and pamphlets, but rather of freedom.
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Destination paradise

Thursday 23 November, 2006

Islamicist movements are becoming increasingly influential in the Arab world. Yet with few exceptions, phenomena like fundamentalism and religiously motivated terror have hardly been dealt with in Arabic literature. By Mona Naggar
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Rousing the lethargic bull

Wednesday 15 February, 2006

Anyone familiar with Middle Eastern literature knows it abounds with jesters who heap scorn on God, the mullahs, and rulers. But if Western media show endless stereotypes of Muslims - hooded men with machine guns and faces distorted with rage - you should not be surprised when hatred escalates and turns violent. By Navid Kermani
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Abu Musab al-Zarqawi: "It's simple, very simple."

Friday 11 November, 2005

Part three: Zarqawi moved effortlessly from one battlefield to the next, from the Iraqi desert to Berlin and into cyberspace. His Internet website was his own private stage. Hostages, the President of the United States and Europe's heads of state were just bit-part actors in a drama directed by him alone. The last part of our series. By Urs Gehriger
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Abu Musab al-Zarqawi: In the network of the phantom

Thursday 10 November, 2005

Part two: Young men travelled to Iraq to be knighted as warriors by Zarqawi. But for the Prince of Al-Qaida, only the most devout were good enough – and they feared neither death nor torture. Part two in our series. By Urs Gehriger and Marwan Shehadeh
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Abu Musab al-Zarqawi: From green man to guru

Wednesday 9 November, 2005

Al-Qaida top terrorist Abu Musab al-Zarqawi was killed on June 7, 2006, when the US army bombed the house he was visiting. Before that, he was Al-Qaida's commander in Iraq and an idol for Islamists throughout the world - a man who took the knife into his own hands to slaughter enemies. Part One of a three-part series tells of al-Zarqawi's rise to be Iraq's most-wanted terrorist. By Urs Gehriger
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An Arab wall has fallen

Friday 1 April, 2005

The "Cedar Revolution" in Lebanon spawns hopes of a democratic spring in the Arabic world. How do the mass demonstrations of Hizbollah followers relate to the awakening in Beirut? By Abbas Beydoun
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