?From the great beyond into the present? ? an interview with Jo Lendle

Hanser publisher Jo Lendle talks about gentle adjustments of languages and marketing strategies.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 18 July, 2006

Outlook India fears the bomb attacks were intended to destroy Mumbai's openness to the world. Il Foglio provides a portrait of the man thought to be behind the attacks, Ibrahim Dawood. In the Guardian, Doris Lessing considers the advantages of "warm-hearted fucking." In De Groene Amsterdammer, an editor complains about his 6.40 euro hourly wage. Nepszabadsag is annoyed at the envy of well-paid scholars. In Le Point, Bernard-Henri Levy honours Zinedine Zidane's ultimate revolt. In Gazeta Wyborcza, conservative Education Minister Roman Giertych explains "I like Jews." In The Nation, Michael Hardt is astounded that the world is complying to his thesis.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 11 July, 2006

In The Spectator, Anne Appelbaum warns against rewarding the destruction of the rule of law in Russia. Szombat introduces the first Hungarian-Jewish weblog, judapest. Il Foglio runs to the defence of Juventus manager Luciano Moggi. The Economist advises George W. Bush not to hug Angela Merkel's political acrobatics too tightly. Die Weltwoche portrays Larry Brilliant, the new head of the Google Foundation.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 4 July, 2006

The Nation reveals how to launch a left-wing bestseller. In L'Espresso, Andrzej Stasiuk examines the monstrous Catholic Communists and Communist Fascists in Poland's post-Soviet morgue. Folio quakes before the Scots. Polityka sees a thousand tiny Spielbergs. Il Folio introduces India's Giovanni Agnelli. DU magazine takes a hike to St. Moritz. Merkur sees true happiness in secularisation. In Liberation, Serge July attends to the future of the press. For The Spectator, Islamism is not a religious movement. And in The New Yorker, Seymour Hersh explains why the US military are loath to invade Iran.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 27 June, 2006

Mike Davis tells the history of the car bomb in Lettre International. Literaturen asks where is the USA headed while Magyar Hirlap asks the same of Europe. Al Ahram protests the prohibition of Dan Brown's "Da Vinci Code." Tygodnik Powszechny asks what is going on with Oriana Fallaci? Umberto Eco explores the possibility that the world is a hollow cave in L'Espresso. And Le Point is talking about a new Dreyfus affair.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 20 June, 2006

The New Republic observes a meeting of stalking bloggers, journalists and politicians in Las Vegas. Outlook India explains the sexual metaphor behind a Bollywood duet with a tulip backdrop. In Le Point, Bernard-Henri Levy demands the immediate closure of Guantanamo. Günter Grass and Mathias Döpfner, head of the Springer media empire, agree to disagree in Der Spiegel. The Spectator calls for more support for Georgia. In Reportajes, Mario Vargas Llosa calls on Peru's new president to modernise the country. Die Weltwoche visits Martin Suter on Ibiza. Nepszabadsag wishes Hungarians would listen to more György Ligeti. And The New Yorker admires the first European representatives of Cool.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 13 June, 2006

The Wikipedia principle is digital Maoism, writes Jaron Lanier in Edge. In L'Express, Eric Hobsbawm and Jacques Attali celebrate Karl Marx as a thinker of globalisation. Segolene Royal is shaking up the French Left, writes Die Weltwoche. The Economist doesn't trust robots. The New York Review of Books tells of Afghanistan's booming opium industry. The Spectator reports from Darfur. DU is dedicated to the hosts of the World Cup. In Le Point, Bernard-Henri Levy points to Angela Merkel as living proof of the topicality of Simone de Beauvoir.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 6 June, 2006

Edward Said is turning in his grave, and the world of letters is turning with him. The London Review of Books finds Robert Irwin's critique of Said interesting, but somewhat beside the point. Al Ahram saves Said from the attacks of pro-Western Muslim exiles. In Il Foglio, Pierre Nora proclaims the superiority of the culture of remembrance over modernism. In Le Figaro, Maurice Druon recalls the universal mission of the French language. Elet es Irodalom explains the legal perfidies of Bosnia-Herzegovina's suit against Serbia at the International Court of Justice. In The Guardian, Orhan Pamuk defends a persecuted Turkish journalist who champions conscientious objection as a human right.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 30 May, 2006

In Merkur, Christoph Türcke defends blasphemy against its critics. Flemming Rose of Jyllands-Posten defends the publication of the Muhammed cartoons in Blueprint Magazine. In Outlook India, actor Aamir Khan refuses to distinguish between murdered Muslims and murdered Hindus. Die Weltwoche travels to Entropia. In Elet es Irodalom, Laszlo Darvasi explains what makes a brilliant Hungarian footballer. Stephane Zagdanski and Theo Klein argue about anti-Semitism in the Nouvel Obs. Marie Antoinette was the victim of a media hate campaign, reports Il Foglio. And Heti Vilaggazdasag wants to purge the Hungarian Academy of Sciences of dead wood.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 23 May, 2006

Polityka takes a look at the blogging scene in Poland. Elet es Irodalom asserts that it is possible to say no in a dictatorship. In Le Point, Bernard-Henri Levy asks why Peter Handke found his way onto the programme of the Comedie Francaise in the first place. Al-Ahram charges Europeans with ethnic absolutism. And Canada's Walrus is worried about Germany's Linda.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 16 May, 2006

Historian Richard Pipes explains in Plus - Minus that the Russians don't in fact want an authoritarian state. Outlook India fears for the banana. In Espresso, Andrzej Stasiuk portrays the Kaczynski brothers as a double Sancho Panza. The Nouvel Obs bewails the decline of French cinema. Le Monde diplomatique bewails the decline of French literary criticism. Painter Howard Hodgkin explains in The Guardian that he hates painting. Die Weltwoche is amazed at young people, sex and the Web. Al Ahram documents a dispute about the Bahai faith. In Journal Culinaire, Adolf Loos rails against Vienese cooking. And the New York Times publishes a magnificent article on the universal digital library.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 9 May, 2006

Orhan Pamuk defends freedom of speech as a universal human right in the New York Review of Books. In Folio we learn who will win the FIFA World Cup. In Der Spiegel, Elke Schmitter pokes fun at big German men's fears of pauperism. Clarin attacks the miserable state of leftist intellectuals. In The New Yorker, a priest tells how he was a classic case of 4-1-9 rip-off. Gazeta Wyborcza wants to rescue Polish liberalism. The Spectator talks about mortification with a celibate numerary. In Le Point, Malek Chebel calls the rejection of flesh un-Islamic.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 2 May, 2006

In The Guardian, A.L. Kennedy outlines the perils of reading naked. In Die Weltwoche, Salman Rushdie defends the right to call other people idiots. For L'Express, Europe is anti-Enlightenment. Leon de Winter writes in Elsevier that we should fill our tanks with ethanol to outfox the mullahs. Merkur says new music should bridge the gap between itself and the listener. The Economist looks back on the life of filmmaker Shin Sang-Ok, who was abducted to North Korea to make films for the "Dear Leader". The New York Times is thrilled with Gary Shteyngart's novel "Absurdistan". And David Sedaris warns against gifts in The New Yorker.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 25 April, 2006

In The Spectator, Boris Johnson visits China and is fazed by charming Chinese and a squid. The Canadian Walrus Magazine gleefully witnesses charred bags of soy milk in a firebombed greengrocer's. Outlook India celebrates the capital of classification. The New Yorker cuts up a whole pig. Przekroj presents a new Polish newspaper purporting absolute objectivity. In Gazeta Wyborcza, historian Anna Wolff-Poweska laments Poland's image as a farrago of frustration. Die Weltwoche describes the political climate in Iran. A train journey reveals to Il Foglio the similarities between Prodians and Berlusconians.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 18 April, 2006

The New Republic imagines atomic weapons in the hands of former child soldiers in Iran. Espresso can't get too euphoric about the election results in Italy. Nepszabadsag thinks that conservative politician Viktor Orban has gone so far right, he's back on the left. The TLS is searching for British intellectuals. In Le Monde diplomatique, sociologist Lahouri Addi takes a bitter look at Algeria's attempt to confront its history. In Le Point, Bernard-Henri Levy tries to make sense of the silence over the crimes of white against black Muslims in Darfur. The New York Times counsels everyone to put their tissue on file before somebody else does.
read more

Magazine Roundup

Tuesday, 11 April 2006

In the New Yorker, Seymour Hersh describes the American plans for a regime change in Iran. Orhan Pamuk tells the story behind Gentile Bellini's portrait of the Sultan Mehmed II in The Guardian. In Clarin, Gianni Vattimo demands respect for the principle of "love thy neighbour" in democratic systems. Le Point sees only losers in the protests against the labour market reforms. Polityka explains the difficulty of building a museum in Warsaw without a building, a collection or employees. The TLS tells of the most bleak and bloated parts of the former Soviet Union.
read more