?From the great beyond into the present? ? an interview with Jo Lendle

Hanser publisher Jo Lendle talks about gentle adjustments of languages and marketing strategies.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Waking a Polish demon

Monday 21 January, 2008

"Fear" is the punchy title of book about Polish anti-Semitism whose recent publication in Poland has sparked an emotional debate. Very few people have come to the defence of its author, Jan Tomasz Gross, who has taken on the difficult task of making uncomfortable facts known to a wider audience and removing blind spots in Polish history. By Jakub Kloc-Konkolowicz
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Back to Rudi Dutschke's pram

Monday 7 January, 2008

So what was 1968? It was when the children of German mass murderers ran after mass murderer Mao Tsedong, says historian and ex-Maoist Götz Aly. Absolutely not, says educationalist and author Katharina Rutschky: The practice of dispelling fascism in the kindergarten was far more important than ideology. Stefan Reinecke and Jan Feddersen preside over a full-blown row.
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The universal spirit takes a walk

Monday 5 November, 2007

Thuringia and Saxony Anhalt are two of Germany's most neglected states today, yet they make up the country's cultural heart. Gustav Seibt drives two hundred kilometres south of Berlin to the land of Bach, Goethe and Hegel that brought forth Bauhaus, Protestantism and the German Enlightenment.
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Good comrades

Monday 29 October, 2007

Last week the 1945 Rechnitz massacre hit the headlines after British journalist David Litchfield maintained that Countess Margit von Batthyany, partial heir to the Thyssen industrial family, had taken part in the atrocity. But such speculations belong to the boulevard press. The real issue is the scandalous role of the German postwar criminal justice system in letting the perpetrators escape Germany unharmed. By Stefan Klemp
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Under the sign of half truth

Monday 10 September, 2007

The dawn of a new era in Central Eastern Europe means confronting the legacy of communism and fascism. While there is no lack of advice and admonition from Western Europe, or coarse dressing-downs from Moscow, these nations must be given the time they need to unravel their complicated history. Romanian-German writer Richard Wagner guides us through some of the thorniest issues. (Photo © Lothar Deus)

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"Being high, being free, terrorism's gotta be"

Thursday 6 September, 2007

Thirty years ago, the kidnapping of German industrialist Hanns Martin Schleyer by the Red Army Faction signalled the beginning of the Deutscher Herbst, the highpoint of German terrorism. Arno Widmann looks back on the culture of violence in the 1970s.
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Shooting down the system

Wednesday 22 August, 2007

A document recently made public testifies that the secret police of the GDR were instructed to shoot anyone attempting to escape over the border to West Germany. While the fact is already widely known, the publication has unleashed a new debate about the shootings at the wall. East German author Reinhard Jirgl explains why. (Image © Peter-Andreas Hassiepen)
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The distance of victims

Thursday August 9, 2007

Raul Hilberg, the father of Holocaust research, died on August 5th. The sobriety of tone and relentness precision with which he exposed the administrative machine behind what he termed "The Destruction of the European Jews" contributed to the book's failure to receive recognition for decades. His portrayal of facelessness spells out a chilling lesson for the future. By Gustav Seibt
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The double Prussia

Wednesday 16 May, 2007

Brilliantly narrated, justly arbitrated: historian Christopher Clark has written a masterpiece on the Hohenzollern state of Prussia. By Volker Ullrich
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Historicising the historians

Monday 8 January, 2006

Historian Norbert Frei invited specialists of the National Socialist era to Jena for a kind of family reunion. At debate was the history of the historians of National Socialism and the question of when, and if, the notion of objectivity begins to apply. By Stefan Reinecke
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The Years of Extermination

Monday 23 October, 2006

Some people will think: "Not another book on the Holocaust!" But historian Saul Friedländer depicts the "Years of Extermination" with tremendous power and drama. His narrative style is much like that of a film director, elegantly combining individual stories with world events. By Dan Diner
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An ungainly treasure chest

Wednesday 23 August, 2006

The new permanent exhibition at the German Historical Museum has reopened in Berlin's Zeughaus. Historian Christoph Jahr says the show is too soft on the GDR, makes unreflective use of both communist and Nazi lingo and is overly rooted in the idea of the nation-state. Lots to say, but little substance. (Image: Bernhard Stigel: Kaiser Maximilian I, 1496)
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The logic of horror

Monday 12 June, 2006

20 years after the "Historikerstreit" there is a new lesson to learn in contemporary history: the repugnant aspects of the twentieth century can not be reduced to the major totalitarian dictatorships and they can not be cleanly distinguished from all that we now view as progress and success. By Götz Aly
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An uprising twice suppressed

Monday 23 January, 2006

This year is the fiftieth anniversary of the Hungarian Uprising of 1956, when the Hungarian people attempted to throw off the yoke of Soviet occupation - to no avail. Hungary faces a year of commemoration fraught with conflict. A chance to reflect on a peculiar tradition in the country's culture of memory: commemoration by not remembering. By Laszlo F. Földenyi.
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A German farewell

Monday 12 December, 2005

The debate over a memorial for the expelled persons from World War Two continues to rage in Berlin. Meanwhile, an exhibition in Bonn takes a refreshingly balanced look at this difficult chapter in German history. By Jörg Lau
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