?From the great beyond into the present? ? an interview with Jo Lendle

Hanser publisher Jo Lendle talks about gentle adjustments of languages and marketing strategies.... more more

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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 29 November, 2011

TeaserPicMoroccans are no less hungry for freedom that Tunisians, activist Hisham Almiraat explains in openDemocracy. But their elites are too cowardly, fears Moroccan journalist Driss Ksikes in Le Monde. Die Welt watches Rutger Hauer explain why Jesus was hidden in Breugel's painting. El Pais Semanal meets a homeless man who wanted to become an executioner. Elet es Irodalom tries to see the positive in the far-right takeover of the New Theatre in Budapest. Gustav Seibt in the SZ scoffs at Habermas' belief in the European citizen. And in Magyar Narancs, Israeli writer Etgar Keret believes the mass demonstrations in Israel have changed the nation's discourse.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 22 November, 2011

TeaserPicMicroMega warns that Berlosconism remains alive and kicking. Magyar Narancs exhorts Hungary to confront its historical responsibility for the events of 1944. Slate.fr sets the record straight about Germany's self-image as Europe's financial bulwark. Elet es Irodalom deplores plans to tear down the home of socialist football. Frankfurter Rundschau says, yes, Germany does have a racism problem beyond the Brown Army Faction. And Al Ahram Weekly voices its doubts about the Muslim Brotherhood.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 15 November, 2011

TeaserPicTelerama introduces the French pioneers of internet journalism. In Eurozine, Charles Taylor and a left-wing Polish Catholic discuss the de-politicisation of politics. Elet es Irodalom explains that 90 percent of the Hungarian population were misinformed about the recent mass demonstrations in their country. Hector Abad in El Espectador is happy to believe in angels. The Tagesspiegel says it's high time we started taking the Nazis seriously. And Die Zeit wonders where all the intellectuals were when Europe withered.
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Magazine Roundup

Wednesday 9 November, 2011

Eurozine suggests letting random Belgian citizens decide the future of their country. Magyar Narancs got a charge out of the mass demonstrations of October 23. But HVG sees demonstrators as motivated by their wallets more than democracy. In the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Frank Schirrmacher and Jürgen Habermas don't understand the criticism of the Greek referendum, and Le Monde believes Papandreou is driven by a fear of extremist violence. Telerama takes a closer look at the utopian spirit of William Morris's designs, and Der Tagesspiegel profiles the new Berlin star: Aerea Negrot.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 1 November, 2011

Without universalism, there can be no human rights, explains Caroline Fourest in Le Monde. There too, Jürgen Habermas calls for more democracy in Europe. For Merkur, Green is classless. Il Sole Ore can't see Italy, only Italians. In the NZZ, J.M. Coetzee can't understand what happened to the intellectual element of religion. And Polityka wonders why the Polish don't appreciate their illustrators.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Elet es Irodalom lauds three biographies for honestly settling acounts with the communist era. In Rue89 Daniel Cohn-Bendit demands: Federalise Europe! La vie des idees reveals tactics used to muzzle the private press in Egypt. Die Welt is incredibly bored by a new online database of Nazi art. Il Sole 24 Ore reminisces on the better days of the Italian economic miracle, and in Babelia, philosopher Jose Luis Pardo has a sure recipe for capitalizing on current market slumps.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 18 October, 2011

TeaserPicIn the NZZ, Najem Wali praises Boualem Sansal for immunising himself against the hypocrisy of Arab intellectuals. In Le Monde Pierre Nora explains that colonialism was in fact a discourse of the left. Nazis should be on the stage, says Peter Esterhazy in Elet es Irodalom, but not, please, with state funding. Who writes about the poor today, Sibylle Lewitscharoff asks in Literaturen. In La regle du jeu, Marc Lambron compares tartar with AC/DC, and Eurozine pitches democracy against purity.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 11 October, 2011

Berliner Zeitung lauds Tranströmer as Nobel Prize laureate while bemoaning the general state of¬† poetry and cheap romantics. Neue Zürcher Zeitung wonders how remote Iceland could have developed such a flourishing early book culture. Magyar Narancs is hopeful that Hungary's recent political disasters are helping to sharpen the slogans of reform. In L'Espresso, Umberto Eco continues to barb Berlusconi with thinly veiled references to Napoleon. Philsopher Javier Goma Lanzon prefers pious lies to misanthropic honesty in Babelia. And La Regle du Jeu sings the praises of the Coucou de Rennes.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 27 September, 2011

We are pleased to announce the return of our weekly Magazine Roundup! Le Monde complains that the left is anything but. Hedonistic and unemployed, Polish youth are becoming like their western counterparts, says Polityka. Eurozine asserts that Gulag literature is not only the territory of the author-eyewitness. In L'Espresso, Umberto Eco takes a stand for Italian universities, which annoy Berlusconi. Berliner Zeitung actually sat quite comfortably through the new stage production of Jonathan Littel's Holocast novel "The Kindly Ones" in Berlin. And Telerama reviews the atheist documentary of Tunisian filmmaker Nadia El Fani.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 21 December, 2010

The Chronicle claims that when Wagner deployed melodic combinations he was actually summoning up sexual positions. Polityka wonders how to get the Polish film industry back on its feet. Segregation existed before multiculturalism, Nepszabadsag reminds us. The New Republic explains why French is new Ancient Greek. Wikileaks is dictatorial, declares La regle du jeu. The book is becoming a community in time for Christmas, according to the Guardian. And Science Fiction is still alive, Salon says, as yesterday's tomorrow rolls to a close.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 14 December, 2010

The Nation reminds us that whistleblowers are hated when they are right. El Espectador favourably compares gringo diplomats with Alvaro Uribe. Salon.com reviews a history of information industries. In the LRB, John Lancaster tells the newspapers what and whom we want to read online. Europe is going mestizo announces French philosopher Sami Nair in Lettre. In OpenDemocracy the writer Uladzimier Arlou outlines Belarussian fears. In Salon.eu.sk, Andrey Dynko prepares for Lukashenko 4.0.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 7 December, 2010

TeaserPicIn Eurozine, Tomas Kavaliauskas and Ivaylo Ditchev search for the Lithuanian and Bulgarian identities. The Economist observes the universe going round in circles in the mind of Roger Penrose. Elet es Irodalom explains why its front page was blank last week. OpenDemocracy explains how personality rights are being used in Russia to stop historians doing their job.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 30 November, 2010

Russian TV doesn't broadcast news but state PR, proclaims journalist Leonid Parfyonov, live on Russian TV (and OpenDemocracy). In the Hungarian HVG, Agnes Heller calls¬† conservative liberals to the barricades. The Guardian reads Vasily Grossman and Houellebecq's poetry. In Rue89, Emmanuel Todd fears the onset of senile democracy. In Literaturen, theologian Gerd Lüdemann outs Jesus as a exorcist. The New Yorker has its eye on the latest status symbols.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 23 November, 2010

What constitutes good literary sex? asks the Independent. Al Ahram feels strangely at home in Michael Haneke's "White Ribbon". The New York Review of Books finds out how to flog more nappies to grannies. In Clarin, Horacio Bilbao finds out why the songs of Mercedes Sosa were retroactively re-privatised. Newsweek listens to Chinese love songs with the singer Zhu Zhequin. Polityka divides Poland down the middle. Rue89 watches "The Wire" in Marseilles. Tim Berners-Lee makes a stand for the free Internet.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 16 November, 2010

In Walrus, Dave Cameron recounts the time travels of his cancer-afflicted father. The Nation reads Gal Beckerman's engaging history of Soviet Jewry. Tehelka explains why India's elderly poor live in fear of their own children. What can we expect of a translation, asks Julian Barnes in the LRB. Prospect discovers that Rupert Murdoch has been distracting Iranians from revolution with his trashy soap. John Updike tells Guernica  how to steal.
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