On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

GoetheInstitute

Bodily finesse

Monday 5 March, 2007

Much of the work of the Renaissance sculptor Conrat Meit has been lost over the centuries. The Bayerisches Nationalmuseum in Munich has pulled together a goodly collection from around the world which proves Meit to be a master of the pot-bellied feminine ideal of the day. By Birgit Sonna
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You photograph what you love

Thursday 22 February, 2007

With an exhibition opening in Hanover, photographer Wolfgang Tillmans talks to Dirk Peitz about the digital revolution, the futile search for absolute truth and his private newspaper archive.
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The triumph of Eerke, Juerke and Veeke

Tuesday 5 December, 2006

German painter Tomma Abts left for London twelve years ago. Her quiet, geometric paintings with Frisian names have just won her the Turner Prize. Morgan Falconer talked to her on the eve of award ceremony.
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The artist and his doctor

Monday 4 December, 2006

A deadly brain disease connects painter Jörg Immendorff and neurologist Thomas Meyer. One has ALS, the other is working on a cure. By Jan Brandt (Image: Jörg Immendorff, "Solo". Courtesy The Saatchi Gallery)

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Raiders of the lost art

Tuesday 7 November, 2006

After being restituted to the heirs of its former Jewish owner by Berlin's senator for culture, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner's "Berlin Street Scene" will be auctioned off tomorrow at Christie's in New York. Critics argue whether the heirs really did have a legal claim to the painting. By Brigitte Werneburg
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The island of Enlightenment

Friday 20 October, 2006

Berlin's Museum Island is perhaps the most important museum complex in the world. It was embellished this week with the reopening of the Bode Museum, housing the finest display of European sculpture anywhere. Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum, takes us on a first-ever tour of European history in three-dimensional form.
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Back to barbarism

Thursday 19 October, 2006

It is no wonder that Caravaggio is being rediscovered. Not because he shows us what we have become, but rather what we have lost. On the occasion of a major show in Dusseldorf, Georg Seeßlen pays tribute to the inventor of modern art.
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Big city lab

Monday 9 October, 2006

Autumn is the season of art in Berlin. Elke Buhr surveys the multitude of galleries, festivals and fairs and comes to the conclusion that art is mainstream and Berlin is at the centre of it all. (Image: Berliner Liste © Anja Vormann, Sausage Faces, 2002)

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"The monumental is my sickness"

Thursday 3 August, 2006

For years, Andre Müller has been widely recognised as one of Germany's most intrepid, and most dreaded, interviewers. In 1979 he met and interviewed Arno Breker, who became infamous in the Nazi era as Hitler's favourite sculptor. We have translated the text in full. (Image: Arno Breker: Bereitschaft (Readiness), 1939. Courtesy Breker Archiv Düsseldorf)
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Modern art in Utopia

Thursday 27 July, 2006

Zamosc, the "Padua of the North," planned as an ideal city in the 16th century, is a remote town in the Polish provinces. Until the international art scene came to stay, that is. Now Sabrina van der Ley and Markus Richter have enticed a group of artists to come create works on the theme "Ideal City - Invisible Cities." By Birgit Rieger (Image: Jaroslaw Flicinski, Up, up and away, 2006)

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Hitler's favourite sculptor

Tuesday 25 July, 2006

Until today, all attempts to show the works of Arno Breker, Hitler's favourite sculptor, have failed miserably. The potential for failure is again great at the first major solo exhibition of Breker's works since World War II. The show relies on loans from Breker's apologists, and access to the archives was limited. By Stefan Koldehoff
See also Andre Müller's interview with Arno Breker from 1979.
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Shadows of the East

Thursday 15 June, 2006

"Humanism in China" is a reproduction of an exhibition of over 600 photographs that toured the People's Republic and has now opened in Frankfurt's Museum of Modern Art. No other contemporary exhibition has managed to get this close to the ordinary life of the nation that makes up a quarter of the world's population. By Tilman Spengler
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Art with free beer and sausages

Wednesday 14 June, 2006

The Grässlin family is opening an art space in Sankt Georgen, a tiny town high up in the Black Forest. Their collection of sculptures and installations is scattered throughout the locale, to the amazement of the international public and the locals alike. By Ulrich Stock
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And then it went boom

Thursday 8 June, 2006

The neo-Expressionist painters known as the "Neuen Wilden" were once what the artists of the Leipzig School are today: international stars, celebrated by the press, courted by collectors. Twenty-five years after the pinnacle of their success, they are now fighting for a place in art history. Cornelius Tittel paid them a visit. (Image: Rainer Fetting, "Self Portrait", 1999)
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Melancholy and abstraction

Wednesday 12 April, 2006

Now showing in Berlin, "Melancholy: Genius and Madness in Art" is the foremost exhibition of its kind. But what makes a work melancholic? Melancholy is difficult to catch red-handed, and scarcely easier to repress. Eliminate it here, and it crops up over there, tough as any weed. Everything testifies to the presence of melancholy. Yet the more you look, the more it eludes your gaze. By Laszlo F. Földenyi
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