?From the great beyond into the present? ? an interview with Jo Lendle

Hanser publisher Jo Lendle talks about gentle adjustments of languages and marketing strategies.... more more

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Magazine Roundup

Tuesdsay 24 March, 2009

Lettre International prints Bela Hamvas' 1960 essay on direct morality and bad conscience. The Nation demands state subsidies for old media. In El Pais Semanal, Javier Cercas waits for a novel about Hitler's moustache hair. In the Guardian, Mary Beard dispels all hopes for a good death. In Novel Obs, Alain Finkielkraut does not mention the Kundera Affair. In the New York Review of Books, John Gray learns all about debt from Margaret Atwood. Elet es Irodalom dwells on otherness. The TLS celebrates Josef Skvorecky. Umberto Eco eyes up the bodies of Mussolini and Berlusconi for L'Espresso. And Carlos Fernando Chamorro sheepishly tells the New York Times how he opposed his mother.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 17 March, 2009

In Osteuropa, Jachym Topol takes the subway and instantly spots the difference between East and West. In Frontline, the physicist Pervez Amirali Hoodbhoy decries the Saudi-ising of Pakistani culture. ResetDoc sees an army of dissidents in the Arab world. In the Guardian, Roger Norrington plays Beethoven in the right tempo. Not the sciences but the humanities can deconstruct religion, the New Humanist asserts. Elet es Irodalom takes a swing at Hungarian lobbying. The Economist is fascinated by an archive from the Warsaw ghetto. The New York Times portrays music tycoon Valeri Gergiev.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 10 March, 2009

Reality exists! But only when we're not looking, the Economist declares. Blindness is the purest form of sight, Claude Lanzmann assures the Nouvel Obs. Vanity Fair tracks down the Viking gene in the Icelandic man. In the American, James V. DeLong looks into the forked future of a paid and a free Internet. In the Believer, author and filmmaker C.S. Leigh fondly recalls a fetid human experience. Italy's rotting, cries MicroMega. The polluter pays! Joseph Stiglitz declares in the Nation. And Jonathan Littell's novel "The Kindly Ones" induces visions of sausages in the New York Times.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 3 March, 2009

In Salon.eu.sk, Jaroslav Formanek takes aim at BHL's arrogance. Prospect succumbs to the charms of Odessa's Black Sea hedonism. In Dissent, historian Michael B. Katz describes his experiences on the jury at a murder trial. In Edge.org, Dennis Dutton links aesthetics with evolution. Fareed Zakaria seeks peace with the Islamists in Newsweek. In Outlook India, the Islamist Maulana Sufi Mohammed describes what this peace will look like. The Observator Cultural opens up the world of Stefan Agopian. And philosophers, Europa discovers, even have their own way of dying.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 24 February, 2009

In the London Review, Perry Anderson counts the servitors in the Quirinale. Salon.eu.sk documents Peter Nadas's speech to Hungary's national bankers - on the subject of trust. In Clarin, Roberto Saviano celebrates the new football god, Leo Messi. In Nouvel Obs, French historian Nelly Schmidt thanks the British for initiating research into French colonialism. L'Espresso finds out what Sarkozy could do for Italian culture.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 17 February, 2009

Do the Palestinians need more space than the Belgians? asks Amos Oz in the Guardian. In Eurozine Slavenka Drakulic talks about learning things the hard way. In Nepszabadsag Bogdan Goralczyk and Laszlo Lengyel despair over Eastern European provincialism. The New Republic worries that a two-class information society will emerge from the ashes of the newspapers. In Espresso, Umberto Eco hurls his books out the window. And in TLS Richard Dawkins delares: Evolution is true.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 10 February, 2009

Vanity Fair recounts how Warner fires successful film producers. In Eurozine, Jens-Martin Eriksen and Frederik Stjernfelt trace the fine line between multiculturalism and racism . In the New Statesman, Dennis Dutton looks out onto ideal, high-protein landscapes. Polityka sips a vicious cocktail, cherry and all. In the Spectator, Darwin praises monkey brilliance. In Le Crois, Simon Leys lashes out at Roland Barthes's unusual indecency. And for Nouvel Obs, Abraham B. Yehoshua reviews Israel's bitter victory in Gaza.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 3 February, 2009

In Le Point BHL remembers the non-Stauffenberg members of the German resistance - civilians like Georg Elser, Sophie Scholl and Willy Brandt. In Nouvel Obs, Roland Barthes weeps for his mother. Outlook India describes the Talibanisation of the IT state Karnataka. Elet es Irodalom explains why the Dutch don't get Peter Esterhazy. The New Statesman wonders at the improbable marriage of physicist Paul Dirac. In Al Ahram the writer Herman P. Spruijt calls for the Arab world to improve IP rights for its writers. Prospect sees red Tories a' coming.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 27 January, 2009

Elet es Irodalom complains about the cowardliness of Hungarian theatre. Wired tells the story of why Google's deal with Yahoo fell through. In Spiked, sociologist Frank Furedi describes the rise of anti-Semitism in Europe. In Salon.eu.sk, sociologist Zygmunt Bauman gets excited about Europe as a multilingual laboratory. The Hungarian Quarterly can't get "Daisy, daisy" out of its head. In the Nouvel Obs, Bahgat Elnadi and Adel Rifaat say it's time to stop psalmodising the Koran and starting thinking it. The New York Review of Books trembles at the feet of Google, which is rapidly becoming the world's largest book store.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 20 January, 2009

How avant-garde can art be when it's paid for by the Deutsche Bank, asks Elet es Irodalom. In the American Conservative, John Mearsheimer blames the Israelis for the war in Gaza. In Le Point, Bernard-Henry Levy has had it up to here with imaginary Palestinians. Al Ahram is worried about the Palestinian takeover of Sinai. Senator Chuck Schumer rallies to save the American middle-class in the Atlantic. The TLS looks at left-wing racism. Polityka scans the contracts for "sponsoring" female students. The New Statesman enjoys some world-class anarchist chocolate in Sao Tome. And Andrzej Stasiuk watches Transnistrian football for L'Espresso.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 13 January, 2008

Portfolio presents Barney Frank, the man who's about to tighten the screws on Wall Street. In the Guardian, Scottish author Andrew O'Hagan wonders when the English working class will awake from its slumber. In HVG art collector Gabor Pados tells us to start snapping up Hungarian art. Umberto Eco pieces together the fragments of John the Baptist for L'Espresso. The New Yorker learns why there are no four-year-olds in the movies. Senagalese historian Mamadou Diouf calls for a new universalism in La vie des idees. And Steven Pinker puts his genes to the test in the New York Times.
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Magazine Roundup

Monday 22 December, 2008

The era of the book is over, publisher's editor Tom Engelhardt declares in The Nation. In the New Statesman Jonathan Derbyshire turns his thoughts to Weltliteratur since Goethe. In Polityka, Adam Michnik praises the Communists for passing their exams in Polish patriotism. Difficulty as a virtue has abandoned the realm of literature to be embraced by the computer game, John Lanchester writes in the London Review of Books. Standpoint takes Germany to task for its love of Russia. The New York Times tells the story of Mexico's victorious battle against the "culture of poverty". The Economist honours H.M., the man without memories.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 16 December, 2008

In Outlook India Arundhati Roy analyses the nature of terrorism. In the London Review of Books, Tariq Ali describes an "honour killing" in his own family. In the Observator Cultural, the writer Mircea Horia Simionescu describes how useful it is to be the victim of infidelity. Elet es Irodalom examines the detrimental influence of the primitive Janos Kadar. In Gazeta Wyborcza Victor Erofeev wishes the credit crunch would hurt Russia more, so that it would be forced to change. In Lettre International Peter Nadas describes the legacy of simulation which had the Eastern Bloc in its grip. The New York Review of Books publishes the Chinese "Charter 2008".
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 9 December, 2008

In Al Ahram, Aijaz Zaka Syed calls upon Muslims to confront the terrorists in their midst. In Atlantic, Gao Xiqing tells the Americans to be nice to their money-lenders. In Przekroj Lech Walesa explains that he has to be top dog. In Nepszabadsag Laszlo Lengyel defines Hungary as bottom dog. In Merkur Dina Khapajewa explains how the Russians use WWII myths to repress memories of the gulag. The TLS maligns journalistic moralising. And the Spectator salutes the gentleman pirates of Somalia.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 2 December, 2008

Outlook India investigates the attacks in Mumbai. In Salon, Martin Simecka outlines the difference between ex-communists and true dissidents. The Walrus pines for the wild Jews. In Przekroj, Dorota Maslowska warns about the imminent combustion of Polish society. In the TLS George Walden consoles hedge fund managers with tins of excrement. Umberto Eco buries himself in a dictionary of onomatopoeia. In the Nouvel Obs, Paul Virilio meditates on the omni-polis of the modern nomad. Sex ain't revolution the Nation declares, with an eye on Iran. The Wired watches Charlie Kaufman bleed. And the New York Times lifts the veil on the world's most powerful censors: the Google Three.
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