The Local View ? Neighbourhood Cinemas and Alternative Film Projects

Many small neighbourhood cinemas invested in the future. The digital options for showing films are opening up new vistas for alternative projects. Not all of them are legal.... more more

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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 5 June, 2007

DU magazine travels down the Danube from the Black Forest to the Black Sea. The New York Review of Books is delighted that at last France is once more an exciting place. For the London Review of Books, Fritz Stern is perfect - for the Germans. Boudewijn Chabot defends "good death" in De Groene Amsterdammer. Tony Blair warns in The Economist against the sophistication of Islamic terrorism. Elet es Irodalom tells of Hungarian writers in Berlin. And The New York Times knows what Jesus ate at the Last Supper: shrooms.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 29 May, 2007

In The New Republic, Paul Berman looks at public debate surrounding Tariq Ramadan and Ayaan Hirsi Ali, and identifies a reactionary turn in the world of ideas. Painter Neo Rauch gives The New Yorker a sting of the contemporary. In Trouw, sociologist Jolande Withuis says women make the better desperadoes. Literaturen travels to Naples. Al Ahram asks: what - aside from a dress code - does the Islamic party Al-Gamaa Al-Islamiya want? Die Weltwoche investigages the education of the creme de la creme in Swiss boarding schools. Peter Esterhazy beats his head against the wall in Tygodnik Powszechny. And The New York Times is astonished at the German ethics of repentance.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 22 May, 2007

In the Spectator, Rian Malan asks why such an incompetent and corrupt politician like Robert Mugabe has so many fans outside Zimbabwe. Ayaan Hirsi Ali asks in ResetDoc what's left-wing about forced marriages. Il Foglio describes how the Agnelli family added class to their wealth. In Europa, director Agnieszka Holland fears the eviction of the Polish elite. Georges-Arthur Goldschmidt says in Le Point what he doesn't like about Günter Grass' autobiography. For The Guardian, Pankaj Mishra criticises the West's moral wasteland post September 11. And Asharq al-Awsat looks into the "Women's intifada" in Turkey.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 15 May, 2007

In the Gazeta Wyborcza, Adam Michnik demands that Polish secret service files be thrown open to the public. In Nepszabadsag, Bela Tarr talks about his new film "Homme de Londres". In the New York Review of Books, Timothy Garton Ash is inspired by "The Life of Others" to wax lyrical about Germany's brilliant strategies of dealing with its past. Al-Hayat has noticed a sharp left turn in Islamist groups. In Letras Libras, Dariush Shayegan promises that Iran is about to become a brave new world. In Elet es Irodalom, Japanese businessman Morita Tsuneo complains about the post-socialist mentality of Hungarian conservatives. The New Statesman portrays the movement of "militant customers" and New York Times, the Artist 2.0.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 8 May, 2007

The Nation would prefer a more sophisticated culture of debate among American politicians. In the Nouvel Obs, Bernard-Henri Levy and Andre Glucksmann clash over Royal and Sarkozy. Outlook India investigates the situation of women in Pakistan. Elet es Irodalom asks why the EU should be responsible for mousetraps but not missile defense systems. Gazeta Wyborcza reflects on the biggest difference between Europeans and Americans. In Die Weltwoche, Lawrence Wright wants to know just what Al Qaeda has to offer politically. And The New Statesman takes a depressed look at Tony Blair's legacy.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 1 May, 2007

The problems in the Middle East are simply overestimated, suggests Edward Luttwak in Prospect. Al Hayat simply won't hear of imposed head scarves. Tygodnik Powszechny foresees technological messianism, in light of the European Soccer Cup 2012 in Poland. The Economist checks out the results of climate change at the Murray-Darling River. Russian opposition politician Irina Chakamada writes in the Hungarian magazine HVG that she fears a Chinese-style dictatorship in her homeland. Outlook India wonders if the denial of sex should really be a grounds for divorce.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 24 April, 2007

In Espresso, Andrzej Stasiuk describes the tribal cult of the Kaczynski brothers. In the London Review of Books, Colm Toibin makes some manly assertions in reviewing Ian McEwan's new novel. In the New York Review of Books, Vaclav Havel explains why as president one is better off not following the example of the Queen. In Revista de Libros, Mexican writer Juan Villoro reflects on what McLuhan would have made of a cyber cafe. The TLS celebrates Rainer Werner Fassbinder, and De Groene Amsterdammer reports on nascent student protests in Russia.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 17 April, 2007

In Asharq al-Awsat, Amir Taheri reminds Western critics of the West that Arab critics of the Arab world are either dead, in jail or in exile. Nepszabadsag wishes for a common history book for central Europe. Bernard-Henri Levy has fallen prey to Barack Obama's seduction in Le Point. Outlook India demands more realism in Indian literature. The New Yorker, Economist and New York Times have all plunged into the French elections.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday April 10, 2007

Vanity Fair presents Annie Leibovitz' star photos of Knut. Outlook India portrays India's most popular writer Khushwant Singh. The New York Review of Books is captivated by Tintoretto's brushstrokes. In the Nouvel Obs, Vladimir Sorokin characterises the Homo Putinus. Letras Libras thinks it highly unlikely that "The Life of Others" will be screened in Cuba. DU magazine looks at the latest form of terrorism that will affect us all eventually. In Le Point, historian Madeleine Ferrieres describes the nourritures canailles. And the New York Times describes Pope Bendict XVI as an intellectual siren.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 3 April, 2007

Merkur wonders why Europeans keep kowtowing to Tehran. Folio is considering marriage. In Le Monde, Claude Lanzmann gets in a huff over Paris' new traffic system under the reign of ecological chubby cheeks. In Gazeta Wyborcza, Norman Davies thinks about what a European history book might look like. The NRC Handelsblad describes the immoral consequences of too many prohibitions. In Literaturen, Gerd Koenen sees the old problems of the Soviet Union re-emerging in Putin's Russia. And the New Yorker has spotted a literary paradigm shift: food instead of sex.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 27 March, 2007

In Lettre International, anthropologist Filip de Boeck examines the bodies that move through Kinshasa. The New York Review of Books asks whether the overflowing prisions in the USA might make sense after all. Taslima Nasrin reviews Ayaan Hirsi Ali's autobiography in Outlook India. In ResetDoc, Martha Nussbaum asks why Hirsi Ali doesn't go to India instead of the USA. Umberto Eco presents the detective-philosophers in L'Espresso. Tygodnik Powszechny can already see the UK ruled by two kings. In Elsevier, Afshin Ellian demands more information on what the EU intends to do. And The Spectator reports from the size-zero hell at a girls' school.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 20 March, 2007

Vanity Fair portrays the king of the mercenaries. Gazeta Wyborcza speaks out against forcing Polish homosexuals into partial non-existence. In The Spectator, Churchill's biographer Sir Martin Gilbert is adamant that Churchill was not an anti-Semite. In DU magazine, Suad Amiry advises against going to the gym in Ramallah. The New Yorker meets Iraqi translators. Il Foglio visits a swinger club where almost anything that's any fun is forbidden. And Die Weltwoche watches a Sheik buy art.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 13 March, 2007

In the New York Review of Books, Julian Barnes looks at the mild French queasiness. In ResetDoc the Nobel Prize Winner for Peace Shirin Ebadi gets annoyed about Enlightenment fundamentalists. The American Scholar doesn't think that Peter Handke is such a genius that we should forgive his admiration of Milosevic. In Nouvel Obs, Alain Minc says he 's going to vote for Sarkozy, even if it means being laughed at in the Cafe de Flore. In Espresso, Umberto Eco makes a plea for Uffiziland. Elet es Irodalom wonders why the Piresen are so hated in Hungary.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 6 March, 2007

In Al Ahram, the Canadian Hadeel Al-Shalchi finds that Egyptian woman wear the headscarf for the wrong reasons. The Economist reports on light and shadows in South Africa. Asharq al-Awsat looks at Arab intellectuals and the French elections. Merkur asks why the Germans have such a loathing for class society. And Elet es Irodalom recommends Hungarians should take a more sobre view of democracy.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 27 February, 2007

Seymour Hersh explains in The New Yorker why the USA bolsters extremist Sunni groups in the Middle East that are sympathetic to Al Qaeda. In Outlook India, writer Nayantara Sahgal defends the Indian diaspora. The Nation asks why workers have disappeared from American films. In NRC Handelsblad, sociologist Paul Jungbluth criticises the feminisation of schools. The Gazeta Wyborcza expresses thanks for Volker Schlöndorff's film "Strike".
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