?From the great beyond into the present? ? an interview with Jo Lendle

Hanser publisher Jo Lendle talks about gentle adjustments of languages and marketing strategies.... more more

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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 8 January, 2008

In Outlook India, Taslima Nasrin feels like the living dead. The New York Review of Books introduces an Iraq blog. In Le Nouvel Obs, Catherine Millet remembers the cold, intellectual eroticism of Simone de Beauvoir. Plus-Minus takes its hat off to Sweden's treatment of foreign cultural treasures. The Guardian shines a torch into the world of bibliotherapy. In Die Weltwoche, General Petraeus puts us in the loop about al-Qaeda's anti-smoking strategy. And Folio uncovers plans to create a second Jewish land.
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Magazine Roundup

Wednesday 2 January, 2008

Il Foglio tells a Catholic tale of heroism from Siberia. Prospect describes the spin-offs of new Irish wealth. Literaturen asks writers about living from the pen. ADN cultura introduces the blogging writers from Brazil. Elet es Irodalom shines a light into the darkest corners of the Hungarian debate. ResetDoc debates Islam and the western left. And the London Review of Books kindly demystifies the credit crunch.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 18 December, 2007

Elet es Irodalom and HVG would like to see more civil courage in the face of the anti-Roma demonstrations of the Hungarian Guard. In The American Interest, Mario Vargas Llosa celebrates Latin American mestizaje. In Itogie, Boris Akunin finds the peaceful life in France. The Economist has observed Sarkozy's verbaholic tendencies. Przekroj patrols the EU's new eastern border. Plus - Minus speculates about dead French kings in aeroplanes. And in the New Statesman, Richard Dawkins wishes us all a "Happy Newton Day!"
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 10 December, 2007

In Outlook India, Priyamvada Gopal asks the left: why are you silent at the persecution of Taslima Nasreen? In The New York Times, Ayaan Hirsi Ali asks moderate Muslims: why are you silent when a 20-year-old rape victim is sentenced to lashing? In L'Espresso, Umberto Eco tells the Pope: religion is the cocaine of the people. In The New Republic, James Wolcott demands thunder and illumination from literary criticism. In Nepszabadsag, Imre Kertesz explains what he means by atonal prose. Gazeta Wyborcza comments on the decline of Stalinism in North Korea. And The Spectator sips Indian wine.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 4 December, 2007

Outlook India depairs for its country as the Taslima Nasreen narrative continues. The New Yorker marvels at the vanity of diary writers. Garry Kasparov explains his guerilla tactics against the Kremlin in the Nouvel Obs. Europa warns of the dangerous beast called Russian nationalism. Merkur defends the free society. Nepszabadsag wants to root out the evil in Hungarian politics. Portfolio describes how free Internet downloads are giving the porn industry a run for its money. The Economist tries to sip at the firehose of Internet data, and gets blown away by useless information. And Il Foglio celebrates Poesia magazine, an Italian miracle.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesdsay 27 November, 2007

In the Boston Review, Abbas Milani gives the ultimate lowdown on Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Outlook India scrutinises the new men's movement against ex-wives. In Literaturen Daniel Kehlmann celebrates the elastic grammar of Heinrich von Kleist. Nepszabadsag and Elet es Irodalom ruminate intensively on the crisis in Hungary. Al Ahram is amazed by Islamic life in New York. In the Nouvel Obs, Anthony Giddens declares the European social model kaput. And the New York Times searches for suicide bombers in the Moroccan city of Tetuan.


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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 20 November, 2007

In the Gazeta Wyborcza, philosopher Michael Sandel comes down hard on affected neutrality. John Banville investigates pulp fiction in Bookforum. In L'Express, Garry Kasparov updates the old list of Russian oligarchs. Il Foglio notes an increase in dowry murders among Indian IT experts. Outlook India explains why so many women throw themselves in front of trains in Londonā€˜s Southall district. In Elet es Irodalm, Philosopher Miklos Tamas Gaspar reflects on the posthumous workings of Romania's Securitate. And The New York Times scrutinises the Sleep-Industrial Complex.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 13 November, 2007

George Bush has plunged America into the worst slump since the Great Depression, writes Vanity Fair. In Nepszabadsag, sociologist Elemer Hankiss would like to see a bit more grit from Hungarian journalists. Il Foglio presents Al Jazeera's new competitor. Commentary remembers a gifted music critic who couldn't read a note. Literary scholar Eva Cs. Gyimesi introduces a Transylvanian magazine for Europe. And Le Point calls Marcel Gauchet the new Plato.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 6 November, 2007

In the New York Review of Books, Sergei Kovalev paints a grim picture of Putin's Byzantine system. In Asharq al-Awsat, French-Syrian sociologist Burhan Ghalioun declares the conspiracy theory to be the enemy of the Arab world. In Gazeta Wyborcza, philosopher Bronislaw Lagowski explains the left's weak footing among the Polish people. In Le Point, Philip Roth resists all attempts to reduce erections to trifles. The TLS criticises solipsistic anti-democratic coffee consumption. And Folio indulges in a spot of sole searching.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 30 October, 2007

The New Yorker recapitulates the history of the universal library and discovers some predecessors of websites like ours. Outlook India portrays the first Indian American governor in US history. Merkur explains who pays the price for the CFA franc. In Nepszabadsag, poet Akos Szilagyi reflects on asymmetrical wars. The Economist unravels the term "armed social work." In Le Point, Peter Sloterdijk holds up his geiger counter to French lunacy. And in The New Statesman, dramatist Kwame Kwei-Armah asks why black British actors have to leave for the States if they want a career, and not just a job.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 23 October, 2007

The New York Review of Books doubts that Islam really is such a peaceful religion. Przekroj fears that Kosovo could divide the EU. In the Spectator, Norman Stone won't tolerate politics interfering with the work of historians. In Letras Libres, writer Gabriel Zaid lists the most common misunderstandings about culture. In Le Point philosopher Rene Girard says the end is nigh. And in Die Weltwoche Roger Schawinski singles out Die Weltwoche in a sea of mediocrity.


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Magazine Roundup

Tuesdsay 16 October, 2007

The New Yorker introduces the well tempered Web. In Magyar Narancs author Richard Fekete uses the Internet to reach an audience the magazines avoid. The Economist casts a glance at grassroots organisations of middle-aged suburbanites. The Spectator surveys a Chinese prison from the inside. ResetDoc debates mosque construction in Italy. Il Foglio giggles over a big fat one. In Die Weltwoche, agricultural scientist Norman Borlaug tells the rich and spoilt: there is no such thing as no-risk. And Hollywood's ten most powerful women convene in Salon.com.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 9 October, 2007

How can one still be on the left, asks Bernard-Henri Levy in the Nouvel Obs. Trouw fans the flames of the Dutch integration debate. Il Foglio presents the only Native American in the Mussolini camp. Elet es Irodalom congratulates Magda Szabo, grande dame of Hungarian raconteurs, on her 90th. Steven Pinker explains in The New Republic the semantic distinction between making love and fucking. The New Statesman scrutinises the legacy of Che Guevara. And The New York Times is concerned about British libel law.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 2 October, 2007

The New York Review of Books declares Iran the winner of the Iraq War. NZZ's Folio magazine is thrilled at India's 2,000 dollar car. In Telerama, Belgian artists express their worries about the division of their country. Elet es Irodalom analyses populist trends in Hungary and Poland. Al Ahram debates the sense and nonsense of the fatwa. And L'Espresso shows how cabaret artist Beppe Grillo is opening up the democratic potential of the Web.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 25 September, 2007

Andrzej Wajda's film about Katyn is not particularly original but it is useful, writes Przekroj. L'Espresso reports on an unknown document by Primo Levi. In Harvard Magazine, Stephen Greenblatt advises academics to take risks a third of the time. The Guardian celebrates Georg Baselitz. In ADN cultura, writer Martin Caparros gives his definition of reportage. Gazeta Wyborcza enjoys the Czech warmth in Polish cinema. In the Nouvel Obs, Hans Magnus Enzensberger describes himself as a participatory observer of 68. In Die Weltwoche, Björn Lomborg says the future is brighter for butterflies than for bears. And The New York Times portrays Michael Haneke as the Minister of Fear.
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