On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 22 April, 2008

In the Weltwoche, Tom Ford makes the case for full, natural pubic hair. Vanity Fair blames Bill Keller for the diminishing Timesness of the New York Times. In Espresso, Umberto Eco mourns the diminishing importance of the newpapers all together. The Times waves its fork about over the English breakfast. In L'Express, über ad-man Maurice Levy wants to give the industry a complete rehaul. The LRB experiences the joy of French painting, the TLS the joy of German Romanticism, the Economist the joy of Japanese "infantile capitalism and Al Ahram, the joy of Russian photography. The New Yorker conquers English with Li Yang.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 15 April, 2008

Elet es Irodolam knows that 'minor literature' doesn't have to be political to be political. World Affairs defends Hirsi Ali, Bruckner and Berman against Buruma, Garton Ash und Ramadan. Rue 89 works through a black book of censorship. In the TLS professor of geriatric medicine, Raymond Tallis, argues that too much brain is the death of literary criticism. Hector Abad speaks out against literary protectionism in Semana. Outlook India is thoroughly put out: revolution is simply not cricket. And Vanity Fair plunges into icy water with the Russians.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 8 April, 2008

The New Left Review introduces China's most influential intellectual magazine, Dushu. Outlook India would be embarrassed to be embarrassed by the Dalai Lama. "Generation 1,000 Euro" has made into Italian cinemas, Caffe Europa reports. In Nepszabadsag, philosopher Gaspar Miklos Tama declares an end to the days of anti-Semitic journalism. Folio is bowled over by the musical compositions of electronic engineer William Sethares. The New York Times is transported back to the founding of Liberia. And Vanity Fair picks apart Monsanto.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 1 April, 2008

In the Blätter Jürgen Habermas joins the debate launched by signandsight.com and Perlentaucher about Islam in Europe. Merkur reveals how Adorno pinned his hopes on the Nazis and had them dashed. In La vie des idees philospher Philippe Lacour celebrates the true DJ of digital knowledge. In Literaturen Micha Brumlik reviews the new Carl Schmitt biography by Christian Lindner. Nepszabadsag takes the pulse of the unconscious body of Hungary. In Edge.org evolutionary biologist Iain Couzin explains the importance of one mormon cricket wanting to bite another in the rear. And New Republic puts its favourite Democrat on the cover.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 25 March, 2008

Le debat explains why the press is on its way out. The New York Times is starting to look like the next victim of a hostile takeover by Murdoch, fears Howell Raines in Portfolio. The New Yorker sees the end in sight for the entire American newspaper industry. ResetDoc examines the role of immigrants in the Italian election campaign. In Europa, Leszek Kolakowski philosophises on success. Aharon Applefeld tells Rue89 what he will be writing about when he turns 268. And Die Weltwoche asks whether anyone in German literature is still taking risks.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 18 March, 2008

In Lettre a Chinese corpse cleaner recounts how he put the smile back on the face of a dead Red Guard. Bad English is no reason to kill yourself, Outlook India believes. The Spectator dances the Kizomba in Harlesden. In the Middle East Quarterly, journalist Mohamed Sifaoui explains why he prayed for the Iraq war. Al Ahram is thrown into a depression by too much theatre. In the Guardian, Blair's former chief of staff remembers the first time he heard Jerry Adams' real voice. And Nepszabadsag wants to be East Central Europe no more.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 11 March, 2008

Vanity Fair exposes a scandalously covert, Bush-approved operation in the Middle East. In the NYRB, Nicholson Baker extols the virtues of the Wiki vandal. Edwy Plenel announces the launch of a new independent online paper Mediapart. L'Espresso sniffs out the diabolicalness of cheese. Expert Sibir sounds out the Siberian art market. And the Economist inspects the tumorous bureaucracy in the belly of the tiger.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 4 March, 2008

The London Review of Books is concerned about second-hand journalism in Britain. Prospect fills us in on the Chinese intellectual scene. Al Ahram explains why Egyptians prefer their flags made in China. Caffe Europa asks: where was Tariq Ramadan when Milan Kundera's book was banned at the Cairo Book Fair. And Gazeta Wyborcza examines the self-confidence of the Polish worker.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 26 February, 2008

A healthy selection this week! Nigerian women should be punished, because they've only got oil on the brain, The Atlantic discovers. Nepszabadsag is amazed: Jan T. Gross has avoided offending the Turkishness of the Poles by the skin of his teeth. Columbian Hector Abad Faciolince sees the human face of Swiss conservatism. The precariat is today's working class, Telerama announces. Al Ahram introduces the first beauty salon for veiled women. And Denis Johnson discovers Paul Wolfowitz's wet dream in Iraqi Kurdistan.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 19 February, 2008

The New York Review of Books sees the future of America in a Harlem hairdressers. In the Gazeta Wyborcza, Serbian historian Slavenko Terzic declares Kosovo's independence illegal. The London Review of Books considers the links between Modernism and liberalism, or the lack thereof. In the Novel Obs, Edgar Morin explains how he became a radical anti-Stalinist. Zanan is dead, long live Zanan! cries Al Ahram. The New York Times portrays the Turkish-Kurdish politician Abdullah Demirbas who wanted to ease the pressure on the Kurds and Armenians to assimilate in Turkey.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 12 February, 2008

Why do Germans like Nicolas Gomez Davila, asks Semana. Le Monde diplomatique goes on a cruise with some Park Avenue ladies. The Spectator buries Venice. Nepszabadsag looks for real Hungarian liberal democrats. In Edge.org, Kevin Kelly looks to the future of the culture industry in the internet. And Portfolio has seen the nemesis of the culture industry in the internet.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 5 February, 2008

The Blätter für deutsche und internationale Politik warns about Google the monster snoop. Merkur has a transcendental experience with Gerhard Richter and Swarovski. Prospect worries about traditional book reviewing. In Nepszabadsag, historian Dusan Kovac looks into the likelihood of Hungarian-Slovakian reconciliation. And the New Statesman searches for the mild Anglican God.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 29 January, 2008

The New York Review of Books is fascinated by bloggers. The Independent celebrates the free market of ideas on the web. In ADN cultura we witness the birth of a literary canon. In Nepszabadsag Csaba Gombar ruminates on dog-whistle politics. In Outlook India Arundhati Roy mentally accompanies Harant Dink's coffin through the streets of Istanbul. In Odra, Ludwik Tomialojc shivers at the thought of a nuclear power plant in Poland. In Espresso Umberto Eco has the function of political opposition explained to him. And The Economist watches Rupert Murdoch fail in China.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 22 January, 2008

In the Chronicle of Higher Education, Laurie Fendrich talks about introducing students to Rousseau's views on women and the theatre. In Nouvel Obs, Abdelwahab Meddeb is hopeful about Iran. The New Republic is up in arms about the anti-Semitic views of Irene Nemirovsky, who was killed in Auschwitz. In the London Review of Books, Eric Hobsbawm gets very excited about the Weimar Republic. Il Foglio describes the close links between pop and drug cartels in Mexico. And Przekroj discovers Polish expats in Ukraine.
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Magazine Roundup

Tuesday 15 January, 2007

In the Nouvel Obs, Algerian writer Boualem Sansal sees only a fine line between Islamism and Nazism. Nueva Sociedad embarks on an odyssey through Mexico City. In Elet es Irodalom, theologian Tamas Majsai wants to see the Church taking a stand against the Hungarian Guard. As long as skirts are being worn short in Indonesia, The Economist reassures us, there's no need to fear Islamism. Philosopher Frederic Worms recommends Henri Bergson as "an antidote to depression" in Le Point. In the New York Times, Steven Pinker dwells on morality and lifestyle.
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