From the Feuilletons

Saturday 10 - Friday 16 May, 2008

Novelist Franzobel warns against demonising Josef Fritzl: the ordinary is the unheimlich. Iraqi writer Najem Wali accuses Arab regimes of using Israel as a scapegoat for self-inflicted woes. Historian Benny Morris says that Israelis have given up hope of peace. Die Welt is blown away by Gerhard Richter's influence in China. And Japanologist Florian Coulmas watches the Roman alphabet fizzle out in Cyberspace.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 3 - Friday 9 May, 2008

The Olympic games belong to the athletes, not the politicians: this is the argument today, just as it was in 1936, against a boycott of the host country. Slavenka Drakulic explains her dislike of the word "Balkanisation". Elfriede Jelinek writes about the architecture of fear in Armstetten. The SZ asks whether Rem Koolhaas' CCTV tower is an "building of evil" and Jacques Herzog explains how democracy weighs heavily on an architect's dreams.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 26 April - Friday 2 May, 2008

As Wolfgang Wagner finally hands over the reins in Bayreuth, the feuilletons opine on the future of the operatic dynasty. The blogs answer to the open letter by the German music industry calling for tight internet surveillance on music downloading. Sociologist Peter Wagner is not surprised at the return of a corrupt government in Italy: it serves the interests of a corrupt populace. And the Berlin newspapers take up the case of Russian artist Anna Mikalchuk whose body was dragged up in the Spree.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 19 - Friday 25 April, 2008

The feuilletons voiced universal disapproval for artist Gregor Schneider's plan to have someone die live for art.The taz celebrates Alexander Kluge who is about to embark on filming "Das Kapital". Film directors Christian Petzold and Robert Thalheim ask why Germans have stopped going to arthouse cinemas. The FAZ looks at why the French still can't stomach Lovis Corinth. And Amos Oz criticises the skewed image of Israel in the German media.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 12 - Friday 18 April, 2008

Writer and sinologist Tilman Spengler sees a Wilhelminian streak in the Chinese leadership. The FAZ admires the Trojan horsiness of Louise Bourgeois' work. Countertenor Philippe Jaroussky explains why the mere sight of a Bach score makes him feel castrated. The SZ mourns the loss of the communists in Italy. The FR dreams of a prostitute's skeleton. And novelist Cecile Wajsbrot feels a new French Revolution in the air.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 5 - Friday 11 April, 2008

Beppe Grillo calls for an end to the order of Italian journalists. Zimbawean author Chenjerai Hove describes the plague of power-lust that has taken over his country while the elephant of ignorance looks on. The NZZ looks at why Putin's Duma refuses to recognise the Ukrainian famine as genocide. The FR documents an open letter from Chinese human rights activists Hu Jia and Teng Biao in the runup to the Olympics. And we find out why the "Train of Commemoration" won't be stopping in Berlin.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 29 March - Friday 4 April

Serbian author Vladimir Arsenijevic talks about his country's aggressive denial of reality. Andre Glucksmann and Bernard-Henri Levy tell Nato to stop obsessing about Russia. Chinese artist Ai Weiwei says there would be no problems in Tibet were it not for media censorship. And the hard-edged modernism of Berg's "Wozzeck" has been unleashed in Paris with unprecedented verve.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 22 - Friday 28 March, 2008

Geert Wilders' anti-Islamic film "Fitna" was at its most effective before it was shown. The Dalai Lama owes his freedom to people who were ready to use violence, says Tibetan writer Jamyang Norbu. Italy's demise can also be read in the confused defeatism of its intellectuals. And a production of Berg's "Wozzeck" in Bern got off to a good start - until the conductor left the pit.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 15 - Thursday 20 March, 2008

Historian Bogdan Musial reveals plans of the Soviet Union to take over the world, with Germany's help. Iraqi author Najem Wali sees no spring in sight for his homeland. Die Welt kisses the foot of the Carrerra-marble mountain that is Oslo's icy new opera house. Norwegian novelist Kjartan Flogstad portrays your average scythe-swinging, jet-setting Norwegian. And the literature at the Leipzig Book Fair is nothing on the tumoil currently engulfing the city.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 8 - Friday 14 March, 2008

The FR outlines the career path of the musical soldier. Die Welt gazes out over Germany's war-torn literary landscape at the Leipzig Book Fair and sees budding health and bogus giants. On the 100th anniversary of Rowolt's first publication, one of its long-serving translators remembers the endless rug-filled meetings. And Romanian novelist Mircea Cartarescu defends the life force, money.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 1 - Friday 7 March, 2008

Umberto Eco drops the book for the external hard drive. Sonja Margolina describes the Russian elections in a Russian lunatic asylum. The SZ sees class war in the Turkish headscarf dispute. Finland is being punished by the Frankfurt Book Fair for closing its Nokia factory in Bochum. And Japan is basking in the glory of a sky full of Michelin stars.


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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 23 - Friday 29 Feburary, 2008

The taz admires Martin Walser's kiss-my-ass tie in Weimar. Poet Peter Rühmkorf outlines the basic law of art. Art historian Wolfgang Ullrich tells his colleagues to start practising heresy. Die Zeit describes a slap in the face for the Russian press. And author Sherko Fatah finds East Berlin in Bagdad.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 16 - Friday 22 February, 2008

Hungarian novelist Peter Zilahy describes how he turned from coal into a diamond, in the EU passport holders queue at the airport. The FAZ talked to frustrated students at a screening of "Persepolis" in Tehran. Norberto Fuentes describes how Fidel Castro became the last Soviet hero. And die Zeit examines Germany's top-down class struggle.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 8 - Friday 15 February, 2008

Die Welt reveals why a Cinema for Peace gala was really a Cinema for Peace with Putin gala. The taz responds to Recep Erdogan's controversial speech in Cologne. Andrzej Wajda speaks about his film "Katyn". The FAZ looks back at anti-Semitic cleansings in Poland in 1968. And the German encyclopedic institution Brockhaus has given up the printed ghost.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 2 - Friday 8 February, 2008

Kenyan writer Meja Mwangi asks how a monster is born. Polish publicist Adam Krzeminski looks at the Germans' blind eye for the Poles. Writer Richard Wagner asks why Kosovars don't focus on electricity. Tariq Ramadan is at the centre of controversy over Israel and the Turin Book Fair. And director Isabella Rosselini talks hardcore sex and insects.
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