On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

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From the Feuilletons

Friday 12 September, 2008

Ukrainian author Oksana Zabuzhko remembers the mass grave in the forest of Bykivnya, where the bodies are inscribed with "the Russian signature". Marcia Pally lists a string of dirty wars waged by the Democrats. The SZ praises "Gomorrah" the Mafia film with no Godfatherly glamour. Georgian writer Dato Barbakadze tells Russian intellectuals to raise their voices in protest. And the Tagesspiegel celebrates the very un-McKinseyan ethos of Cern.
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From the Feuilletons

Friday 5 September, 2008

Jungle World investigates academic anti-Semitism and Jewish self-hatred with Theodor Lessing. It also looks at Gaussian distribution as an instrument of suppression. Christoph Schlingensief talks about his stay in the first station of hell. The feuilletons are relieved to finally close the chapter on the Bayreuth war of succession. And Andreas Dresen's film "Cloud 9" ushers in the grey phase of the sexual revolution.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 23 - Friday 29 August, 2008

Sitting in Moscow traffic, Sonja Margolina learns a tough lesson about life in Russian civil society. The Tagesspiegel dismisses the second volume of Günter Grass's autobiography, "The Box", as an orgy of vagueness. Christoph Schlingensief remembers how Wolfgang Wagner stole his urinal. And Die Zeit fears for the youth of today, who have had the protest scared out of them.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 16 - Friday 22 August, 2008

Did Carl Philipp Emmanuel hide the end of the 'Art of Fugue'? Organist Ton Koopman casts aspersions on Bach's son. Michel Houellebecq explains why the problem is genital. Diedrich Diederichsen remembers meeting a certain New York waitress back in '82. Ukrainian writer Yuri Andrukhovych explains why he's on Georgia's side. Osssetian literature academic Shanna Chochiyeva explains why she thinks the Georgians are Nazis. And Czech playright Pavel Kohout says what the Russians need is another revolution.
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From the Feuilletons

Friday 9-15 August, 2008

Georgian author Devi Dumbadze criticises the powerless nationalism of his compatriots. Andre Glucksman and Bernard-Henri Levy diagnose Europe in a coma. A new book by Patrick Buisson describes the erotic confusion that gripped Vichy France. Syrian philospher Sadik Jalal al-Azm points to a third way for Islam. The SZ takes a magical history tour of YouTube piano recitals. And old Austrian men in lederhosen take to the streets in protest against Kippenberger's crucified frog.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 26 July - Friday 1 August, 2008

This year's 'Parsifal' in Bayreuth is a romp through German history. Twenty years after the fall of the Wall, Ingo Schulze says the West has made less than minimal progress. A group of intellectuals take up Pascal Bruckner's appeal to "Boycott Durban 2". Anselm Kiefer reveals all about his Virgin Mary visitation. Necla Kelek is deeply suspicious of Tariq Ramadan's campaign against forced marriage. And Carlos Fraenkel is wowed by the hermeneutic flexibility of Indonesian Muslims.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 19 - Friday 25 July, 2008

Karadzic's successful hiding methods prompt the SZ to draw up a set of rules for war criminals living underground: rise early and travel to work by bus or train. The Bosnian writer Dzevad Karahasan remembers the thousands of lesser war criminals who are still living in impunity. Theatre director Ariane Mnouchkin has produced a number of short protest films against the Olympic Games in Bejing. And Berlin is still recovering from a breathless weekend of Obamarama.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 12 - Friday 18 July, 2008

Romanian-German writer Herta Müller protests against the participation of former Securitate informants in the Berlin Summer Academy. Richard Wagner seconds her objections. South African writer Andre Brink explains why he remains loyal to his homeland. Spanish poet Marcos Ana remembers how he smuggled his first poem out of prison in a tube of toothpaste. Sociologist Gerhard Schulze examines the very real fears about nursing homes. And Algerian author Boualem Sansal egotistically pins his hopes on the democratising forces of the Mediterranean Union.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 28 June - Friday 4th July

Moscow curator Andrei Erofeyev has lost his job because of the negative effects of art on the mind. The SZ welcomes Fethullah Gülen as the world's top public intellectual and merrily waves goodbye to the Enlightenment in the process. Die Welt reads a black book of the French Revolution. Die Presse explains what the United Nations Human Rights Council understands by "abuse of freedom of expression". On Kafka's 125th birthday, the feuilletons heap praise on the second volume of Reiner Stach's biography. And Jonathan Franzen explains what he loves about Berlin: it's a shadow of its former self.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 21 - Friday 27 June, 2008

Olivier Roy locates the roots of Islamic radicalisation in the West not the Koran. Slavenka Drakulic comments on the UN's decision to classify rape as a war crime. Peter Handke's love of Serbia is obscene says Jonathan Littell. Günther Verheugen and Jürgen Habermas argue about the Irish "no". Habermas meets Tariq Ramadan in Schloss Elmau. Writer and translator Georges-Arthur Goldschmidt slams the Parisian "Pleiade" publishers for including Ernst Jünger in their library of classics but not Thomas Mann.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 14 - Friday 20 June, 2008

Richard Wagner, Jürgen Habermas and John Banville speak their minds on the Irish "no". Austrian writer Josef Winkler has won the prestigious Georg Büchner prize. Croatian literature has taken a civilising step backwards. Iranians are being told to stop drinking tea. And a French school teacher has identified Godot.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 7 - Friday 13 June, 2008

Architect Jacques Herzog explains why you can't force democracy on China. Chinese writer Ma Jian believes Tiananmen Square should be remembered nevertheless. The NZZ opens its new series on radical Islamism with an ex-Islamist who asks: where are the martyrs of pluralism? And Turkey's participation at this year's Frankfurt Book Fair is a minor victory for civil society.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 31 May - Friday 6 June, 2008

Sudanese translator Daoud Hari condemns the world's indifference and China's complicity in the killings in Darfur. The Berliner Zeitung picks apart the fake Euro2008 war that has kicked off in German and Polish tabloids. Anselm Kiefer is the first visual artist to win the prestigious Peace Prize of the German Book Trade. And Rem Koolhaas seems to be having a go at the media for the enormous sums he is being paid by the Chinese regime.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 24 - Friday 30 May, 2008

Ex-Stasi agents are at the heart of a spy-scandal currently rocking Germany. Najem Wali is amazed by the silence of his fellow Iraqi writers. Daniel Libeskind explains why he doesn't build for dictators. Three German museum directors are sharing the knowledge of the world with a sheik in Dubai, in return for wads of cash. And Peter Handke has issued some impenetrable words about Yugoslavia.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 17 - Friday 23 May, 2008

After the honour killing in Hamburg, women's rights activist Serap Cileli tells Germans to draw the line. Columbian journalist Hector Abad Faciolince discovers what his countrymen are worth - in US visa dollars. Neofascist historical revisionism is up and saluting in Italy. Bahman Nirumand examines Abdolkarim Soroush's thesis that not God but Mohammed wrote the Koran. And having overdosed on the naivety of new German feminism, the SZ wishes it was a meatball in Poland.
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