On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 3 - Friday 9 January, 2009

Daniel Barenboim explains why the West Eastern Divan Orchestra will continue to play while Gaza burns. Abdelwahab Meddeb is unsparing in his criticism of both Israelis and Palestinians. On the death of Danish poet Inger Christensen, the FAZ remembers her ingenious way with the alphabet and the Fibonacci sequence. Harald Weltzer rallies to protect the future from those who would throw cash at the credit crunch. Film director Christian Petzold reflects on places of longing in Brandenburg. And theatre director Dimiter Gotscheff remembers how Heiner Müller made him walk into a tree.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 13 - Friday 18 December, 2008

Sonja Margolina watches Stalin's halo glowing ever brighter in Russia. Ulf Erdmann Ziegler looks into a dark future under the light of another EU norm. The FAZ is not all too comfortable with the plans for the "House of European History" either. The ageing Japanese are keeping their newspaper industry alive and kicking. Richard Swartz visits Europe's last divided city. And thousands of Turks are apologising online to the Armenians, but PM Erdogan is not among them.
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From the Feuilletons

Friday 12 December, 2008

The NZZ wonders why the generous American presence abroad is not reflected in foreign-correspondent numbers. Serbian author Bora Cosic stumbles across a passage in Witold Gombrowicz's diary from 1967 about JMG Le Clezio, a "young god in tiny swimming shorts". Victor Zaslavsky remembers the 15,000 "local activists" without whom the massacre in Katyn would never have been possible. Jorge Semprun talks about the freedom of choice in Buchenwald. Danish author Jens Christian Gröndahl explains why the independence of Greenland is merely a formality for its colonial ruler. And the Frankfurter Rundschau looks at Greek violence.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 29 November- Friday 5 December, 2008

The writers Tariq Ali and Suketu Mehta explain why it's easy to point to Pakistan when Mumbai burns. Historian Arno Lustiger warns against a repeat of the UN anti-racism conference in Durban. Composer Konrad Boehmer draws a parallel between New Music and capitalism. And Jane Birkin reveals all about painless facelifts.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 22- Friday 28 November, 2008

Viktor Erofeev describes how Putinism is buying citizens' loyalty, by allowing them control over their private lives. Dmitri Muratov praises the courage of the jury in the Politkovskaya murder trial. The SZ prints David Grossman's acceptance speech on winning the Scholl Siblings Prize. The blood and sperm theatre of the Volksbühne is dead, but refusing to stay down. The Norwegians are warming to Knut Hamsun again. And Levi-Strauss has turned 100.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 15 - Friday 21 November, 2008

As Ukrainians commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Holodomor, the Berliner Zeitung is shocked by Dimitri Medvedev's elastic understanding of the word "genocide". The FR remembers a fateful decision that shaped the lives of Alexandr Solzhenitsyn and Varlam Shalamov. In die Welt, Mikhail Khordokovsky predicts a global leftwards shift. Pianist Peter Feuchtwanger sings the praises of the drooping wrist. And sociologist Wolfgang Sofsky says it's the tight fist - which makes the world go round.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 8 - Friday 14 November, 2008

Art Spiegelman talks about his "Portrait of the Artist as a Young %@)*!" The editor of salon.eu.sk, Martin Simeka, responds to the eleven star authors who swooped to Milan Kundera's defence. The FAZ is furious about Ferran Adria's lack of social responsibility. The SZ is amazed at how a sleeping pill can make Turkish blood boil. Alexander Kluge's film of Marx's "Kapital" is a work of art about a work of art. And the veil is finally lifted on WWI documentaries.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 1 - Friday 7 November, 2008

The Kundera affair mostly goes unmentioned, despite the collective defence of the author by a group of Nobel Prize laureates. Only the Tagesspiegel demands objective truth. The taz portrays the flamboyant Turkish star author Murathan Mungan. The Finns are having to revise a WWII myth. Navid Kermani hopes that Obama's victory will speed up Europe's long learning process. And philosopher Jürgen Habermas reports back on the Hopperesque melancholy of pre-election USA.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 25 - Friday 31 October, 2008

South African writer Ivan Vladislavic describes the literary braindrain in Africa. Turkologist Corry Guttstadt decries Turkish cowardice during the Holocaust. Novelist Slavenka Drakulic explains why the Croatian media has finally opened its eyes to serious crime. And cellist Anner Bylsma agonises over prolonged vibrato.
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From the Feuilletons

Friday 24 October, 2008

Milan Kundera has demanded an apology from Respekt magazine for dragging his name into the dirt. Bernard-Henri Levy leaps to the author's defence, as does György Dalos. Sonja Margolina talks about her own experiences on the border of betrayal in the hands of the KGB. Painter Anselm Kiefer has won the Peace Prize of the German Book Trade but, says the FAZ, he's stuck in a fairytale forest. And the FR reports on a protest by historians against the EU memory police.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 11 - Friday 17 October, 2008

In which Milan Kundera is embroiled in a denunciation affair; a Saudi cleric bans the popular Turkish soap 'Noor'; novelist Steinunn Sigurdardottir explains how Iceland became Gordon Brown's Falklands; Turkey discovers its multicultural heritage; the doors open on slavery in Islam and the Bulgarians concoct a plan to raise the sunken city of Seuthopolis.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 4 - Friday 10 October

Reactions to JMG Le Clezio's Nobel Prize are at best lukewarm. An anonymous banker discusses the personal advantages of his job. Ralf Dahrendorf refuses to bitch about the Americans. The point is not whether women in Turkey should wear the headscarf, says Necla Kelek, but where they can go without it. La Traviata has been transformed on Platform 9 in Zurich's central station. And now for a blasphemous question: Was Beuys an "eternal Hitler youth"?
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From the Feuilletons

Thursday 2 October, 2008

The SZ celebrates a scattering of doppelgängers in a new production of Kafka's "Trial". It also ogles a philosophical diable de l'amour on Arte. In die Welt, Peter Weibel debunks the cult of the artist. The Berliner Zeitung marvels at the riches of Omsk. The NZZ fumes at the arrogance of Horace Engdahl and revisits the cleavage of Madame de Stael.
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From the Feuilletons

Friday 26 September 2008

Actor Moritz Bleibtreu tells how playing RAF terrorist Andreas Baader like he was could only result in comedy. Simon Rattle, Daniel Harding and Michael Boder have conducted Karlheinz Stockhausen's "Groups for Three Orchestras" like a flight in a helicopter. Bulgarian author Georgi Gospodinov explains why Berlin's urinals are different from Bulgaria's. And Uwe Tellkamp's thousand page novel "Der Turm" about a small GDR elite has hit reviewers like a bombshell.
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From the Feuilletons

Friday 19 September, 2008

The FR castigates the Germans for being so nuts about Obama when they've never elected so much as a Turkish mayor. Author and entrepeneur, Ernst-Wilhelm Händler, declares that it's not capitalism that has failed but the state. Andrzej Stasiuk spent his holidays in the Russian steppes where unlimited space felt penal. The NZZ sings a swan song for German theatre's Utopian dreams and the SZ bids farewell to the man who put the fun back into New Music.
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