On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

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From the Feuilletons

Friday 25 - Thursday 20 April, 2009

Jonathan Franzen enthuses about obfuscation in "Peeling the Onion".The cabaret artist Johnny Klinke fondly recalls his time sweating on the production line at Opel. The SZ goes underground with "Les Untergunther". In his blog, philosopher Abdolkarim Sorous explains why God was formless for the Persian poet Rumi. The FR was impressed by the hilarious thoroughness in the Romanian films at the GoEast festival. The NZZ inspects the dire situation of the Roma in Eastern Europe. And has art got a bad case of helper syndrome?
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 18 - Friday 24 April, 2009

Russian poet Olga Martynova explains how the KGB reinvented the Orthodox Church. Die Welt takes on the environmental group which is fighting to ban DDT. Darwin biographer Jürgen Neffe celebrates the future spirit of the book, unfettered by a physical body. Dutch writer Adriaan van Dis puts his faith in civil society to help pull South Africa out of the wetsand. The FR explains to 1,3000 German scholars, writers and publishers why they need Open Access. And the NZZ speculates on the poisonous contents of Chinese banks.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 11 - Friday 17 April, 2009

Hungarian authors Peter Nadas and Peter Esterhazy see black for their country. Sonja Zekri visits Kyrgyzstan, a state blessed with both scenic and geopolitical charms. There are depressing reports in from the pile of rubble that was once the Cologne City Archive. Jungle World asks what the UN understands by "defamation of religions". Alice Schwarzer draws attention to a blind spot in the media coverage of the Winnenden shootings: eleven of the twelve kids shot in the classroom were girls. And the old Kanzlerbungalow in Bonn opens to the public: the house that launched a thousand "democratic" buildings.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 28 March - Friday 3 April, 2009

The FR picks through the remains of GDR literature. A symposium in Marburg celebrates the 80th birthday and lifetime achievement of the "Jürgen Habermas" of German poetry. Swiss author Urs Widmer explains why his compatriots were so shocked by tone of the German finance minister - it was just like the way an average German orders bread. The NZZ listens to the protracted diminuendo of the (Japanese) piano maker Bösendorfer. And the German copyright agency GEMA has taken on Youtube - to the detriment of German record labels and musicians.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 21 - Friday 27 March, 2009

Albanian writer Ismail Kadare explains why he joined the Communist Party. Götz Aly defends himself against the vociferous critics of his book on 1968. Die Welt wanders across Tiananmen Square and realises that Chinese youth are completely oblivious to what happened there 20 years ago. Swiss writer Alex Capus defends the German finance minister and his crusade to crack Swiss bank secrecy. And at a performance of Ligeti's "Le grand Macabre" in Brussels, the stage is dominated by a mountainous woman whose nipples can be opened like garden gates.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 14 - Friday 20 March, 2009

German-Irish writer Hugo Hamilton looks the depressed Celtic tiger in the eyes. At the Leipzig Book Fair the taz discovered the power of 11 to 17-year old girls. The Polish are furious about the overly simplistic American film "Defiance". Olivier Roy explains the background of the term Islamophobia. And at least one good thing has come out of the recession - a splendid new play by Elfriede Jelinek.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 7 - Friday 13 March, 2009

Historian Karl Schlögel explains why he only teaches Stalinism in the context of minus 40. The taz asks whether Israel is really home to 25 percent of global injustice? Roland Reuß sounds the anti-Google call: Dispossess the dispossessors! Christoph Schlingensief hopes to meet Bunuel in the afterlife. And Die Welt considers death by mouse-click.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 28 February - Friday 6 March, 2009

Achgut.de reveals how the public broadcaster ZDF reveres its politicians. Author Eva Menasse singles out the only palatable thing left in Carinthia: its dumplings. Emir Kusturica warns about unadulterated Hollywood evil. Painter and sculptor Markus Lüpertz lashes out at the meretriciousness of photography. And Suad Saleh extols Islamic feminism.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 21 - Friday 27 February, 2009

Writer Sibylle Lewitscharoff sees Bulgaria rotting inside and out. The FAZ witnessed two minutes of utter madness with Edita Gruberova in Bavaria. The latest flare-up in Polish-German debate prompts Richard Wagner to ask whether it's possible or even desirable to write a shared European history. Crime writer Veit Heinichen is being harassed by an anonymous letter writer in a real-life crime crazier than any of his fiction. And we learn how the Pius Brothers would change the electoral system.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 14 - Friday 20 Feburary, 2009

Israeli historian Benny Morris is waiting for the next Ben Gurion. The FAZ looks at the dire situation of China's migrant workers. After Norman Foster axed his Berlin offices, the Berliner Zeitung looks at why he was here in the first place. Die Welt remembers how Marinetti tried to put an end to pasta - with a mixture of espresso and Eau de Cologne. And Grandmaster Flash has to admit that vinyl has passed its sell-by-date.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 7 - Friday 13 February, 2009

Twenty years after the fatwa was issued against Salman Rushdie, Perlentaucher says the Left has abandoned all its principles in the name of multiculturalism. Israeli historian Tom Segev is shocked at the election successes of right-wing populist Avigdor Lieberman. The NZZ looks at the paperless literary world in Malawi. And after reading Günter Grass's diary from the year of reunification, Monika Maron cries: "The toad made a wrong call."
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 31 January - Friday 6 February, 2009

Islam has never been more scorned than it is in Iran today, claims German-Iranian writer Said. Michael Cimino enthuses over contemporary Serbian, Brazilian, Korean and Middle Eastern cinema that puts Hollywood to shame. Necla Kelek takes Germany's ethnic Turkish politicians to task for stylising their clientele as victims. And the Berlinale opens with Tom Tykwer's "The International" - a thriller about the opacity of corporate glass.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 24 - Friday 30 January, 2009

Bernard-Henri Levy talks to Ehud Barack about Israel's lose-lose situation in Gaza. Ernst-Wilhelm Händler debunks an illusion of economic control. Martin Pollack is horrified by a batch of photographs being auctioned on Ebay. Kaiser Wilhelm's biographer has found someone else to blame for the Great War. Crime writers Fred Vargas and Cesare Battusti commit a classic blunder. And the SZ stages a debate about whether or not von Stauffenberg deserves to be called a hero.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 17 - Friday 23 January, 2009

Left-wing Israeli pop singer Aviv Geffen hates being made to look a fool by Hamas. The SZ is amazed at the changes that have taken place in Turkey since the death of Hrant Dink. Historian Peter Steinbach deflates the heroic myth propagated by "Operation Valkyrie". The FR mourns the death of German art cinema after the Oscar nomination for "Baader-Meinhof Complex". And have you seen Australia's Obama?
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 10 - Friday 16 January, 2008

Author Sibylle Lewitscharoff recalls the unsavoury cast of 68ers during her time in the Spartacus Bolschewiki-Leninisten. Palestinian poet Salman Masalha is dismayed at the inability of Arab-Islamic societies to exercise self-criticism. Dominique Fernandez remembers his father, the Nazi collaborator Ramon. The Tagesspiegel portrays Ahmed Aboutaleb, the revolutionary mayor of Rotterdam. And the Jungle World is perturbed by all the Hitler saluting at demonstrations against Israel's bombardment of Gaza.
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