The Local View ? Neighbourhood Cinemas and Alternative Film Projects

Many small neighbourhood cinemas invested in the future. The digital options for showing films are opening up new vistas for alternative projects. Not all of them are legal.... more more

GoetheInstitute

From the Feuilletons

Saturday 05 - Friday 11 September, 2009

Despite lofty promises that the Frankfurt Book Fair would be a platform for free speech, a number of Chinese speakers have suddenly been uninvited. The feuilletons pounced. The FR records the worried noises coming from the German end. The SZ prints excerpts from the speech that author Bei Ling was due to make this Saturday in Frankfurt - until he received a phone call, that is. In Freitag magazine, a number of prominent authors call for Germany to pull out of Afghanistan. And another German author, Ulf Erdmann Ziegler, is determined to defy the EU light bulb policy.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 29 August - Friday 4 September, 2009

Film director Andrzej Wajda remembers the outbreak of WWII in Poland. In the Austrian paper Der Standard, Adam Krzeminski and Martin Pollack ask why the Austrians are keeping mum about September 1? In Jungle World, the curator of the exhibition "The Third World in the Second World War" explains that collaborators should be included - in the name of historical probity. The Chinese literature functionary Li Pengyi explains why the Publishing House for Tibetan Studies needs state support. Slavenka Drakulic visits Tito's summer residence. And the artist Thomas Demand explains why he prefers subtlety to politics.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 25 - Friday 31 July, 2009

Theatre manager Ulrich Khuon speculates on whether theatre has severed itself from real life. Venice biennial curator Daniel Birnbaum celebrates the artistic merits of polytheism. Daniel Kehlmann's opening speech at the Salzburger Festspiele left the feuilletons in a tizzy. Renrou Sousuo has millions of Chinese participating in an online witchhunt. And the premiere of Quentin Taratino's Nazi's slasher movie left Berlin cheering in a pure oxygen high.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 18 - Friday 24 July, 2009

Romanian author Herta Müller describes for the first time how she was terrorised by the Securitate in the 80's. In Le Monde, Andre Glucksmann refuses to believe Medvedev's assurances that Natalia Estemirova's killer will be found. On the 90th anniversary of the Bauhaus, Wolfgang Pehnt has an idea for the ultimate Bauhaus exhibition: skip the Bauhaus bit. 3D films are booming and die Welt knows why. The NZZ raises the alarm: Peking is planning to tear down the 2000 year-old centre of the Uigur silk route city, Kashgar.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 11 - Friday 17 July, 2009

Chinese writer Yu Hua remembers the night he discovered that human warmth travels further that light. Abdourahman A. Waberi thanks Obama for his forthrightness in Ghana. Chinese author Mo Yan explains why his books lack decorum. Twenty years after the 'fiche affair', the NZZ reads the bizarre files on Max Frisch. The taz looks into reasons for the murder of Natalia Estemirova. And die Welt bids farewell to a leaden German institution: the Grimm dictionary.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 4 - Friday 10 July, 2009

Egyptian author Alaa Al-Aswani compares the murders of Marwa el-Sherbini and Neda - and accuses the West of Islamophobia. The taz admires comic artist Guy Delisle's eye for detail. Translator Wei Zhang explains the role of the voluntary police force in upholding the Chinese censorship system. Writer Navid Kermani implores Western governments not to recognise the Iranian elections. Martin Walser declares his love for Angela Merkel, but he wants something in return.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 27 June - Friday 7 June, 2009

The death of choreographer Pina Bausch has plunged all the feuilletons into mourning. It was not movement that interested her, but what moved people, the NZZ remembers. The author David Albahari deliniates the minefield of sensibilities that every Serbian author has cross. Iraqi author Najem Wali explains why it is not naive to believe in Israeli ideals. Chinese artist Ai Weiwei removes all his clothes and jumps up and down in protest against China's automatic porn-detector.
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From the feuilletons

Saturday 20 - Friday 26 June, 2006

German-Iranian writer Navid Kermani is keeping a diary in Tehran. Henryk Broder explains why the Germans are particularly qualified to tell the Israelis how to behave. Isabel Fonseca reports on the treatment of the Roma in Kosovo, where they are dying at the hands of the UN. The film industry has discovered that illegal downloaders are not such a threat to them after all. And in a dramatic U-turn, Egypt is actually having Israeli books translated into Arabic.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 13 - Friday 19 June, 2009

Iran, of course, has been the focus all week. Mariam Lau looks at what Hussein Moussavi stands for. German-Iranian poet Said is deeply sceptical about this so-called reformer. And the FAZ issues a fatwa: rigged elections breach sharia! Chinese writer Yu Hua talks about freedom in China, where you can bad-mouth anyone or anything, except the government. The first Euro MPirate Christian Engststöm wants copyright cut to 5 years. The German Bundestag has just adopted its first Internet censorship law. And Jürgen Habermas remembers the constructive intellect of sociologist Ralf Dahrendorf.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 6 - Friday 12 June, 2005

Iranian women's rights activist Parvin Ardalan explains how tiring it is when hemlines are not dictated by fashion. At the Venice Biennale, Slovak charm won over German talking cats. Are we really living in capitalism, asks Peter Sloterdijk, after all "fully fledged tax states reclaim half of all economic successes every year". The Jungle World watches as Iran's religious elites rip each other to shreds. And the taz shows that arranged marriages can ruin men's lives too.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 29 May - Friday 5 June, 2009

The blog Liza's World is stunned by the world's silence on the allegations against Sri Lanka. Chinese writer Li Dawei sees Mao's spirit wandering China's streets by night. On the 200th anniversary of Hayden's death, the NZZ looks at his humiliating contract with the royal house. The new Magritte Museum in Brussels unveils a radical new hanging of the artist's work. And economic ethicist Peter Koslowski debunks the notion the financial world needs to rebuild trust.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 23 - Friday 29 May, 2009

New evidence has emerged that could force Germany to rewrite the entire history of its '68 movement. Stefan Aust calls it "a turning point". Götz Aly tells the West Germans to throw open their files. Abdelwahab Meddeb protests against the mass slaughter of pigs in Egypt. Sonja Margolina comments on a Freudian-Orwellian law that is about to be passed in Russia. And Claude Lanzmann and Bernard Henri-Levy appeal to stop the anti-Semite Faruk Hosni from becoming the next Unesco director-general.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 16 - Friday 22 May, 2008

Theatre directors Claus Peymann and Rene Pollesch clash over the importance of literature. Rolf Schneider argues in favour of the Demjanjuk trial. British novelist David Lodge talks about the transition of artist to businessman. And Cannes is awash in blood and gore, from Lars von Trier's sex 'n' scissors shocker to Brillante Mendoza's protracted scattering of body parts. Thank goodness for Quentin Tarantino's Nazis!
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 9 - Friday 15 May, 2009

German politicians have learnt nothing from Obama about how to win votes online. The Hessian Culture Prize for intercultural dialogue has ended in a mighty intercultural standoff. Navid Kermani wonders why it's only the Meiers and the Schulzes that get to discuss Goethe.The SZ sees the light, and it's coming through a concrete wall in Mexico. David Attenborough explains how to argue with a creationist: tell him the one about the child's eyeball and the worm. And the world's oldest sculpture has been dug up in the Swabian Alps - a busty lady in mammoth tusk.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 2 - Friday 8 May, 2009

Director Peter Stein warns against the trap of unconventionality. Writers are like birds, says Jonathan Franzen. And birds are so poor they eat beetles. Some investigative stat crunching leaves the German government's plans to tackle child pornography looking like an excuse to censor the Internet. Author Christoph Hein protests against the official exhibition "60 Years - 60 Works", which completely ignores the GDR. And could the bust of Nefertiti be a beautiful fake?
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