On the Death of Siegfried Lenz ? ?You have to justify your life?

Siegfried Lenz, one of the great writers of German post-war literature is dead. He died on 7 October 2014, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.... more more

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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 28 August - Friday 3 September, 2010

SPD politician and Bundesbank board member Thilo Sarrazin has published a book about the state of the nation that has had the media and politicians hopping mad for an entire week. "Deutschland schafft sich ab" firmly locates the blame for the decline of Germany with the country's fast-growing Muslim population. We present a selection of the voices from the booming chorus of disapproval and the few who have dared to say that much of this criticism is missing the point.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 24 - Friday 30 July, 2010

Applause thunders in for the rats of Lohegrin, Klaus Maria Brandauer as Oedipus in Colonus, and Wolfgang Rihm's constructive irony. lovegermanbooks loved the German independent book fair. Liv Ullman remembers an historic meeting - between Ingmar Bergman and Woody Allen - that was shrouded in silence and punctuated by meatballs. It was not booze and drugs and thumping music that killed the Love Parade, writes the NZZ in its obituary. And how many phone calls does it take to shut down an Iranian newspaper?
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 17 - Friday 23 July, 2010

Nothing is more expensive than yesterday's papers: Telepolis explains what Brazil would do to a Springer Verlag that tried to charge 27,000 Euros to read the Vossische Zeitung from 1934. Alice Schwarzer takes the Left to task for defending the burqa. The city of Weimar is not letting a little thing like the Holocaust get in the way of its friendship with Iran. The SZ prays for the worn-out souls of 21st century office workers. And the taz frolics in the dirt of Bonaparte's farting electro beats.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 10 - Friday 16 July, 2010

Fifteen years after Srebrenica, Germanist Jürgen Brokoff says you cannot separate politics and poetry in Peter Handke. The sentence handed out to the Russian curators Andrey Erofeev and Juri Samodurov is lenient only on the surface, the papers say. The SZ passes on some painful advice from Fritz Teufel, the comedy '68er who died on July 6. Publisher Klaus Wagenbach explains the "heart clause" and when it kicks in. And the integration miracle of Marxloh is now attracting international therapy tourists.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 3 - Friday 9 July, 2010

David Grossman calls on Israel to offer Hamas a ceasefire. Kent Nagano has handed in his resignation at the Bavarian State Opera, due to bad blood between him and a man who eats intrigues for breakfast. John Bock has transformed Berlin's Temporary Kunsthalle into a FischGrätenMelkStand full of burnt pizzas and black soup. The NZZ raves about Christoph Marthaler's "Papperlapapp" at the Papal Palace in Avignon. And Prague is haemorrhaging artworks to London, Paris and Vienna.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 26 June - Friday 2 July, 2010

The former publisher of Peter Wawerzinek, this year's Ingeborg Bachmann prizewinner, celebrates the comeback of the wandering bard. Micha Brumlik explains the German dilemma in all things Israel-related. Peter Demetz rediscovers the writer H.G. Adler. The SZ is worried about Munich's museums where the cobwebs are multiplying. The Voodoo priest Max Beauvoir talks about bad vibrations in Haiti. Video artist Shrin Neshat discusses her first feature film, "Women Without Men".
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 19 - Friday 25 June, 2010

At the Berlin Biennale, Belgian artist Renzo Martens encourages the Congolese to enjoy their poverty. Historian Dan Diner supports Turkey's foreign policy somersault. Philosopher Daniel Dennett says the media squandered a massive opportunity by not publishing the Mohammed cartoons. Hanover's local paper reports on an intercultural dialogue that had to be put on hold for a moment - due to flying stones. The Süddeutsche Zeitung was winded by the harshness of Christa Wolf's revolutionary zeal. And the taz just can't get enough of really long Asian films.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 12 - 18 June, 2010

Curator Jean-Christophe Ammann explains why the female body is the first victim of global art. The taz checks out the South African design scene. Necla Kelek presents a new study which links religious belief in young Muslims with a reluctance to integrate. Dutch writer Geert Mak blames provincialism for the election results in the Netherlands. The Slovak elections, says Michael Hvorecky, were a triumph against populism.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 5 - Friday 11 June, 2010

Warsaw curator Pawel Leszkowicz talks about changing attitudes to homosexuality in Poland. Der Freitag profiles Pierre Assouline, the first literary critic to elicit 1000 readers' comments with an essay on Georges-Arthur Goldschmidt. Western liberals are to blame for dismantling universal human rights, according to Caroline Fourest in Perlentaucher. Speaking in honour of Marcel Reich-Ranicki at the Börne award ceremony, Henryk Broder bids him to show more engagement for Israel. And a German book on the mafia has Italians seeing red.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 29 May - Friday 4 June, 2010

David Grossman voices his desperation about the "Free Gaza" debacle. Henning Mankell, on the other hand, describes it as a resounding success. Composer Heinz Holliger declares his love for Schumann's madness. The Tagesspiegel decries the moral chestbeating of the German media in condemnation of former president Horst Köhler. Iranian film maker Jafar Panahi diagnoses the prison guard's fear of the cinema. And we learn why the sonic 'mosquito' is just enough to keep the kids at bay.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 22 - Friday 28 May, 2010

Laszlo F. Földenyi joins Canetti is asking a thoroughly unfashionable question: What is man? Joachim Gauck, former commissioner of the Stasi archives, talks about fighting the system. Novelist Sibylle Lewitscharoff sinks her teeth into toothless literary criticism. The Tagesspiegel visits Andres Veiel on the set of his first feature film - about Gudrun Ensslin and Bernward Vesper. Hoo Nam Seelmann describes South Korean methods of crisis management. And the taz calculates the true price of the Ipad, which just might be a padded cell.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 15 - Friday 21 May, 2010

Jürgen Habermas gives German political elites a sharp dressing-down. Former Israeli ambassador to Germany, Avi Primor, denies that anti-Semitism is on the rise. Memorial's Swetlana Gannuschkina reveals what is really under the uniforms of dead Chechen insurgents. At Cannes, the non-stop cheering in Adrej Ujica's montage "Autobiografia lui Nicolae Ceaucescu" elicits murderous emotions. Two South African directors discuss the effects of apartheid on theatre audiences, 16 years after it ended. And decapitated heads go on show at the Musee D'Orsay.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 8 - Friday 14 May, 2010

"Why are raindrops always trickling down the window? the taz asks new Turkish cinema with a sigh. Albert Speer dresses down the vanity of the UFO building, and those designed by Zaha Hadid in particular. Filmmaker Eva Munz describes a night in Bangkok on the verge of civil war. Italian writer and politician Fiamma Nirenstein discusses the origins of left-wing anti-Semitism. And an Albanian Autocephalous Orthodox bishop remembers the dangers of coloured egg shells under the Hoxha regime.
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From the Feuilletons

Monday 3 - Friday 7 May, 2010

The new Documentation Center of the Topography of Terror museum on the site of the former SS headquarters in Berlin, meets with universal approval. The same cannot be said of the Holocaust Memorial five years on: Henryk Broder describes it as a ten-tonne exonteration. The public broadcaster ZDF has cancelled an interview with Danish cartoonist Kurt Westergaard - but is denying it. And the FAS has witnessed a miracle, in the form of Igor Levit on an out of tune piano in China.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 24 - Friday 30 April, 2010

Mikhail Khordokovsky refuses to abandon hope for Medvedev and Putin. Lower Saxony's first Muslim minister Aygül Özkan might have failed to get the crucifix out of the classroom, but she should keep up the good work. Jörg Lau has only contempt for the preventative cowardliness of the western media in the Mohammed-in-a-bear-suit fiasco. At the Munich Music biennial, composer Tado Taborda shows why humans don't need to shout in the rain forest. And Kristof Schreuf's new album "Bourgeois With Guitar" returns the sheen to hackneyed pop classics.
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